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We're building a web service and anticipate that there could be substantial data being returned.

How will ASP.Net and IIS 6 handle this? What kind of things can we do to make this less resource intensive?

For example, we currently have a serializable class, which has property which is an array of another serializable class type. When the web service is called, it queries a large set of records from the database, instantiates the class, populates the array property, then returns the class which gets serialized out.

How is this getting handled under the hood? I imagine that the entire DataSet object is stored in memory, then the entire serializable object is stored in member, then serialized and the entire xml is in memory, and finally streamed to the caller.

Are there things I can do to reduce memory consumption such as streaming out the results as they are being read from the database? Is this possible?

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Old fashioned web service or WCF service hosted on IIS? – Shadow Wizard Jul 4 '11 at 22:39
    
Old fashioned web service. – Jeremy Jul 4 '11 at 23:19
    
@Jeremy: the answer is, "don't use old fashioned web services for new development". – John Saunders Jul 5 '11 at 2:43
    
@Jeremy: is using a newer WCF service an option? – Justin Shield Jul 5 '11 at 2:50
    
As long as other non .net applications can call the wcf service that is fine. The WCF service must still support web service only capable callers. – Jeremy Jul 5 '11 at 21:35

I'm not sure simply swapping to using WCF is the answer as the question is really about the load on requesting the data.

There are several things to consider even before choosing your prefered service method:

Can you cache the data? If it is possible to store the data in-memory then this would prevent there being the draw each time the data is requested. However if the data is prohibitive in size, you could consider writing the data from the db to file and serving it from there.

You could consider something like Redis with its VM mode. This would allow you to cache the data but if it isn't accessed frequently, the data could be written to file to prevent excessive use of memory.

Is there any way, the call to the database can be broken into several more efficient calls?

You could consider calling the data asynchronously if the time taken to execute the call is lengthy.

Finally, is it essential that the data is served as a webservice? Can the data be served as an XML document?

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WCF will solve this problem, first by not making four copies of the message in memory at a time; second, if practical, a WCF service can use TCP/IP and binary instead of HTTP and SOAP; third, if necessary, WCF can do true streaming. – John Saunders Jul 7 '11 at 15:15
    
@John - Can WCF do true streaming if the calling app only supports the tranditional web service model? – Jeremy Jul 8 '11 at 5:06
    
@John: I agree that WCF is superior and may be the appropriate service but as I state, before choosing the service, other things should be considered. – Digbyswift Jul 8 '11 at 7:46
    
@Jeremy: yes, it can send the output as it is produced. How the consumer reads the output is a different question. Even if the consumer decides to read the whole thing into memory first, that doesn't require the WCF service to create the whole thing in memory. – John Saunders Jul 8 '11 at 16:53
    
@Digby: my reading was that the OP is concerned about memory usage, not about the time it takes to retrieve the data. He says, "I imagine that the entire DataSet object is stored in memory, then the entire serializable object is stored in member, then serialized and the entire xml is in memory, and finally streamed to the caller. Are there things I can do to reduce memory consumption" – John Saunders Jul 8 '11 at 16:55

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