Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I am having some trouble with sprintf and fstream functions in order to create new text files for a POS program/check whether the file already exists. I don't know if i am doing something wrong because the same set of functions works fine in other places in my code...

This particular section of code is taking input from the user to create a details file, the name is made up of the first and last name details that were entered into the system. For some reason the new file is not being created. When I step through the program I can see that the custDetC variable is being filled with the correct data. I have also included the file existence check as it may or may not have something to do with the issue at hand...

Tony Mickel

    sprintf(custDetC,"%s%s.txt", firstName.c_str(), lastName.c_str());
    cout << custDetC << endl;

    FileEX = FileExists(custDetC);

    if (FileEX == true)
    {
        fopen_s(&custDetF,custDetC, "rt");

        fprintf(custDetF, "%s %s\n", firstName, lastName);
        fprintf(custDetF, "$d\n", phoneNo);
        fprintf(custDetF, "%s $s\n", unitHouseNum, street);
        fprintf(custDetF, "%s %s %d", suburb, state, postCode);

        fclose(custDetF);
    }
    else
    {
        char *buf = new char[100];
        GetCurrentPath(buf);
        cout << "file " << custDetC << " does not exist in " << buf << endl;
    }
}

bool FileExists(char* strFilename) 
{
    bool flag = false;
    std::fstream fin;
    // _MAX_PATH is the maximum length allowed for a path
    char CurrentPath[_MAX_PATH];
    // use the function to get the path
    GetCurrentPath(CurrentPath);
    fin.open(strFilename, ios::in);

    if( fin.is_open() )
    {
        //cout << "file exists in " << CurrentPath << endl;
        flag = true;
    }
    else
    {
        //cout << "file does not exist in " << CurrentPath << endl;
        flag = false;
    }
    fin.close();

    return flag;
}
share|improve this question
1  
Also, snprintf! Use it! Never use sprintf; that's where many buffer overruns come from. –  Nicol Bolas Jul 5 '11 at 2:00

1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

You seem to be opening the file for reading, but you need to open it for writing.

Instead of "rt" use "wt" in fopen_s()

share|improve this answer
    
that seems to create the file, but i get a nice Unhandled exception error of: Unhandled exception at 0x0f9d13af (msvcr100d.dll) in POS_test2.exe: 0xC0000005: Access violation reading location 0x656e616a –  Tony Mickel Jul 5 '11 at 1:30
1  
which was indeed me not thinking about what i was writing to the file and sending a full size string into a single char... e.g. adding .c_str() to the end of the string variables –  Tony Mickel Jul 5 '11 at 1:40
    
It happens man :) –  hexa Jul 5 '11 at 1:42

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.