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For a cross platform library in C#, I wish to have a certain set of methods marked protected for extensibility purposes. These methods are later accessed by reflection, using meta-programming with attributes

However, on Windows Phone 7 accessing protected methods by reflection isn't allowed, and instead I wish for them to be marked internal.

So what I'm wondering, is if I could do something like this, in C#, or if there's a better workaround for it?

using System;
using System.Collections.Generic;
using System.Linq;
using System.Text;

#if WINDOWS_PHONE
    #define ACCESSOR internal
#else
    #define ACCESSOR protected
#endif

namespace Example
{
    public class MyTestClass
    {
        [MyAttribute]    
        ACCESSOR void MyMethod()
        {
        }
    }
}
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4 Answers 4

up vote 3 down vote accepted

You can do this:

[MyAttribute]
#if WINDOWS_PHONE 
internal
#else
protected
#endif
void MyMethod()
{         
} 

But you're better off making them internal or protected internal.

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Well I get a security exception if the member is marked protected. So unless "protected internal" doesn't mean it's protected, then I'm not sure it would do any difference. And again, marking them internal would mean no extensibility from other assemblies (which is against the whole idea) –  Claus Jørgensen Jul 5 '11 at 1:47
    
protected internal means that it's protected OR internal. Give it a try. –  Jordão Jul 5 '11 at 1:49
    
Yes, it's OR... –  Jordão Jul 5 '11 at 1:54

I don't think you can use constants in replace of language construct's, what you should be able to do is:

namespace Example
{
    public class MyTestClass
    {
        [MyAttribute]
    #if WINDOWS_PHONE
        internal void MyMethod()
    #else
        protected void MyMethod()
    #endif
        {
        }
    }
}
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I believe this will work:

namespace Example
{
    public class MyTestClass
    {
        [MyAttribute]    
#if WINDOWS_PHONE
        internal void MyMethod()
#else
        protected void MyMethod()
#endif
        {
        }
    }
}
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You cannot use #define this way. Its not like C. According to MSDN

#define lets you define a symbol. When you use the symbol as the expression that is passed to the #if directive, the expression will evaluate to true.

Robert Pitt's answer looks like a good work-around.

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