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I want to use sed to take any arbitrary stream and append a null byte to each byte. What's the magic sauce to make this happen?

I've tried a number of things, but have trouble with:

  1. matching any byte - . seems to be a subset, i.e. any character, not any byte.
  2. adding a null byte - I thought it should be \0, but that doesn't work.
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4  
Why sed? It is for editing text, and what you're asking it to do is take text and make non-text...probably not the correct tool for the job. If the input data is ASCII text, then the output would be UTF-16LE. You'd likely be best off using Perl or Python. –  Jonathan Leffler Jul 5 '11 at 1:56
    
Thanks. My environment's toolset is limited. Luckily, I do have perl. Cheers. –  Synesso Jul 5 '11 at 2:16
1  
The revised question is a very different proposition from the original. Converting UTF-8 to UTF-16 is, in general, moderately complex; you have to read 1-4 bytes of input, and generate 2 or 4 bytes of output, worrying about surrogates and malformed input, etc. The original question - how to add a NUL (or zero) byte after each character in the input - is much, much, much simpler. (It remains true that if the input is ASCII - 7-bit byte values between 0 and 127 - then the 'add a NUL afterwards' gives you UTF-16LE. But only if the UTF-8 data is in the ASCII subset.) –  Jonathan Leffler Jul 5 '11 at 2:57
    
I reverted the edit. –  Synesso Jul 5 '11 at 3:05

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Answer for original question

I suggest using Perl or Python; here's a (verbose) Perl solution:

#!/usr/bin/env perl
use strict;
use warnings;
while (<>)
{
    s/./$&\0/gs;
    print;
}

For ASCII text input, this gives you UTF-16LE output (without a BOM). Given that it is Perl, TMTOWTDI, and it can be reduced to a one-line; see the answer by paxdiablo.

Given this explicit loop structure, the easiest way to print the BOM is to add a print statement before the loop:

printf "%c%c", 0xFF, 0xFE;

Given a one-liner, you need a BEGIN block:

perl -pe 'BEGIN{printf "%c%c", 0xFF, 0xFE;} s/(.)/\1\0/gs;' "$@"

There are at least 4, arguably 5, superfluous spaces in that script.


Answer for revised then reverted question

The modified question was:

I want to use sed to take any arbitrary a UTF-8 stream and append a null byte convert it to each byte UTF-16. What's the magic sauce to make this happen?

The revised question is a very different proposition from the original. Converting UTF-8 to UTF-16 is, in general, moderately complex; you have to read 1-4 bytes of input, and generate 2 or 4 bytes of output, worrying about surrogates and malformed input, etc. The original question - how to add a NUL (or zero) byte after each character in the input - is much, much, much simpler. (It remains true that if the input is ASCII - 7-bit byte values between 0 and 127 - then the 'add a NUL afterwards' gives you UTF-16LE. But only if the UTF-8 data is in the ASCII subset.)

However, for accurate translation, the tool of choice should be iconv:

Usage: iconv [OPTION...] [-f ENCODING] [-t ENCODING] [INPUTFILE...]
or:    iconv -l

Converts text from one encoding to another encoding.

Options controlling the input and output format:
  -f ENCODING, --from-code=ENCODING
                              the encoding of the input
  -t ENCODING, --to-code=ENCODING
                              the encoding of the output

Options controlling conversion problems:
  -c                          discard unconvertible characters
  --unicode-subst=FORMATSTRING
                              substitution for unconvertible Unicode characters
  --byte-subst=FORMATSTRING   substitution for unconvertible bytes
  --widechar-subst=FORMATSTRING
                              substitution for unconvertible wide characters

Options controlling error output:
  -s, --silent                suppress error messages about conversion problems

Informative output:
  -l, --list                  list the supported encodings
  --help                      display this help and exit
  --version                   output version information and exit

Hence, to convert from UTF-8 to UTF-16LE:

iconv -f UTF-8 -t UTF-16LE  input > output

Interestingly, I don't see an option to add a BOM to the output, at least not with iconv version 1.11 from 2007 on RHEL 5 (nor the same version on MacOS X, dated 2006 -- don't ask, I don't know!).

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Seems like it would be easier to read 1 char at a time. Something like: perl -ne 'BEGIN{$/=\1} print $_, "\0"' –  William Pursell Jul 5 '11 at 2:25
    
@William: TMTOWTDI - it is Perl, after all. –  Jonathan Leffler Jul 5 '11 at 2:29
    
Awesome. How do I add the BOM also? (FF,FE in my case). I thought printing these chars would be a cinch... –  Synesso Jul 5 '11 at 3:03

If you have Perl available, you can use the one-liner:

perl -pe 's/(.)/\1\0/gs'

to do it to every character. Leave off the s at the end if you want newlines preserved as-is (but it sounds like you want those done as well).

The following transcript shows this in action:

pax$ echo hello | perl -pe 's/(.)/\1\0/g' | od -xcb
0000000    0068    0065    006c    006c    006f    000a
          h  \0   e  \0   l  \0   l  \0   o  \0  \n
        150 000 145 000 154 000 154 000 157 000 012
0000013

pax$ echo hello | perl -pe 's/(.)/\1\0/gs' | od -xcb
0000000    0068    0065    006c    006c    006f    000a
          h  \0   e  \0   l  \0   l  \0   o  \0  \n  \0
        150 000 145 000 154 000 154 000 157 000 012 000
0000014
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1  
Is perl -p -n contradictory, as in 'print every line (-p) and do not print every line (-n)'? Fortunately, it seems that Perl latches onto the first of those options that is specified, or maybe '-p' overrides '-n'. –  Jonathan Leffler Jul 5 '11 at 3:25
    
@Jonathan, they're not contradictory since the docs don't say the -n means "do not print every line", just that it wraps your commands in a loop. However, it is redundant (-p means -n plus print), so I'll change it. –  paxdiablo Jul 5 '11 at 3:54

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