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I see this type of apparent magic in all sorts of AS3 code, but here is a reduced example:

package {
    import flash.display.Sprite;
    import flash.events.*;
    import flash.net.*;

    public class URLLoaderExample extends Sprite {
        public function URLLoaderExample() {
            var loader:URLLoader = new URLLoader();
            loader.addEventListener(Event.COMPLETE, onComplete);
            loader.load(new URLRequest("example.txt");
        } // 'loader' should fall out of scope here!

        private function onComplete(evt:Event):void {
            var loader:URLLoader = URLLoader(evt.target);
            trace ("Received data: " + loader.data);
            //unsure if removal below is necessary (since I don't
            //know where 'loader' itself is hiding!)...
                //  - NOTE: this removal is never in the examples!
            loader.removeEventListener(Event.COMPLETE, onComplete);
        }
    }
}

As indicated in the code comment, the loader variable should fall out of scope after the URLLoaderExample constructor. However... it still seems to be kept alive (not garbage collected) somewhere since the onComplete listener/handler is able to receive it cleanly.

Where is the magic/hidden/global reference to loader that keeps it alive so that it can complete it's load operation, and then be handed to the onComplete listener/callback? Can this reference be seen somewhere?

To help with context... as a similar example, I know that the loader instance will have the onComplete listener registered. I also know I need to be careful to use removeEventListener at all times (?) to avoid potential memory leaks resulting from stranded listeners. What concerns me is that I don't understand where the magic loader reference is and whether (or when) I need to clean that up.

Is it maybe the loader.load() call itself that stuffs loader somewhere globally?

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Accepting an answer is just a polite gesture, I think. Even if you decide to compile your own. :) –  Nox Noctis Jul 9 '11 at 0:44
    
@Nox Noctis - I will definitely be doing so. No need to nag. :) However... been busy and am not sure how I'll proceed. I don't like to accept pseudo-correct answers. Yours is 100% correct and useful re: GC and general scoping. Although for the specific URLLoader case, J_A_X is likely correct (testing would be time consuming) on the internal voodoo referencing. When I return to flash development I'll be looking into it more, possibly merging the answers. –  Russ Jul 11 '11 at 14:23
    
@Nox Noctis - Or... I could accept reality and that I likely won't have the time to fully test out the magic/hidden reference holding noted by J_A_X... I've done so and accepted your answer with a comment. –  Russ Jul 11 '11 at 14:27
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4 Answers

up vote 5 down vote accepted

This example is definitely error-prone, since loader may get garbage-collected before loading is finished. When you subscribe to COMPLETE event with onComplete method, you create a reference from loader to your class URLLoaderExample. And what you need to make sure GC will no ruin the loader is creating a reference to it.

GC never guarantees you timely cleaning though, even when you explicitly kill all the references. (See this post for resources on GC logics.) But it can garbage-collect a loader in the process if there are no explicit references to it. If you try your test in an app that uses memory (and is not just sitting there doing nothing), you are likely to see this behaviour. And you are much more likely to see loader garbage-collected if you try loading swfs instead of data.

Using weak references does not help here, because when you do so, you tell GC: "feel free to kill what I, the dispatcher, am referencing, I have no pity for it." In your example it would be like: "feel free to kill URLLoaderExample instance if it looses other viable references", which is, well, pointless. Here's one good article on useWeakReference.

Listeners do not prevent a dispatcher from being garbage-collected. An inactive object is one that no longer has any references to it from other active objects. So, if an object itself has references to something external, it does not prevent this object to be removed from the memory.

So, to answer your question briefly: the reference is nowhere, you are just lucky to see loading working correctly. Well, to be completely precise, it's the function activation object (as it is called in ECMA spec), that is used as a scope for local variables and references them. But anyway, it gets disposed on method return, and you can never get a reference to activation object itself (again by spec).

EDIT Some more words on who holds who from being garbage-collected. Added due to apparent misunderstanding in comments.

A quotation from Adobe livedocs:

useWeakReference:Boolean (default = false) — Determines whether the reference to the listener is strong or weak. A strong reference (the default) prevents your listener from being garbage-collected. A weak reference does not.

So, subscription to event creates a reference FROM dispatcher TO listener. And dispatcher is free to go, unlike listener. Listeners do not prevent a dispatcher from being garbage-collected. And dispatcher CAN prevent listeners from being garbage-collected, which is why we have useWeakReference.

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This is exactly what I figured was the case... loader is still around only because it hasn't been GC'd yet. The main thing making me think there was some other magic was that the Adobe docs themselves use this exact (albeit bigger) example. I'm still somewhat skeptical because of examples like that! –  Russ Jul 5 '11 at 8:16
    
Also - who is actually doing the URL fetching work after the constructor exits? Is it still the dereferenced-but-not-yet-GC'd URLLoader instance somehow working in the background? Unfortunately it appears that flash.net (where URLLoader is) is buried in the player and has no visible source for it, so no help there. Since it is single-threaded, behind the scenes I would expect that loader.load opens the socket, sends the GET request, then sets up a callback with an underlying select or something, but I'm totally guessing. –  Russ Jul 5 '11 at 8:24
    
Btw, it's not all that easy to compile a standalone example of a loader being garbage-collected in the process. Apparently, GC's behaviour is dependent on the system's load and capabilities and on Flash Player type (external, plugin or whatever). But a little googling for these problems will show you a lot of posts. –  Nox Noctis Jul 5 '11 at 10:29
    
@Nox Noctis, er, what? "This example is definitely error-prone, since loader may get garbage-collected before loading is finished." This statement is false. It would only be GC'ed if the weakReference argument of the addEventListener function is set to true. When an event listener is added, the object that you're currently attaching it do does not get garbage collected. Each object holds their own handler function references, but if the references are external, the GC will not delete them from memory. –  J_A_X Jul 5 '11 at 15:34
1  
You are wrong, I'm afraid. A quote from Adobe livedocs: useWeakReference:Boolean (default = false) — Determines whether the reference to the listener is strong or weak. A strong reference (the default) prevents your listener from being garbage-collected. A weak reference does not. So, subscription to event creates a reference FROM dispatcher TO listener. And dispatcher is free to go, unlike listener. Listeners do not prevent a dispatcher from being garbage collected. And dispatcher CAN prevent listeners from being garbage-collected. –  Nox Noctis Jul 5 '11 at 15:58
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When you add an event listener, you implicitly create a reference to the loader object (by default). However, you can remove that by setting the eventlistener to a "weak" reference.

Here's how you'd do that:

loader.addEventListener(Event.COMPLETE, onComplete, false, 0, true);

The last argument sets "useWeakListener" to true, which means a reference to the loader will not be made. In that case, the loader should be GC'ed.

The important thing to keep in mind is that if you add an event listener with a strong reference, you need to remove it (as you did in the example). If you use a weak listener, you'll need to make the loader a private variable in the class otherwise your callback is in a race situation with the GC.

Here's the documentation on the method: http://help.adobe.com/en_US/FlashPlatform/reference/actionscript/3/flash/events/IEventDispatcher.html

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I'm not sure that this is correct... I'm pretty sure I understand weak references, and don't think it applies here. Setting useWeakReference to true prevents the listener registration from being used as a reference count for the object/instance that owns the listener/callback. The loader object, and it's listener list should be able to drop out of scope with no problem, regardless of what is in the listener list... shouldn't it? I think you have it backwards. What I want to know is why loader doesn't die... it would be odd if loader referencing itself could keep it alive. –  Russ Jul 5 '11 at 7:13
    
... unless the listener list is not kept on the event target (loader in this case) like I thought, but is kept in some other global location? That would explain it. –  Russ Jul 5 '11 at 7:16
2  
According to the Flex source code, there's a global EventManager that holds all the references in a centralized place. –  Shakakai Jul 5 '11 at 7:22
1  
Where do you see the EventManager reference? I've been digging through the source for such a reference and haven't found anything useful. I just searched for EventManager and can't locate it... I just see various mouse things like FlowElementMouseEventManager. Also this is the best online source I can link to... do you have a better source? –  Russ Jul 5 '11 at 7:52
2  
To eliminate any confusion that may result from reading this answer (or my comments above), the article linked by Nox is an excellent one. A dispatcher can NOT keep itself alive because the listener is in the dispatcher, too... ie: referencing what I said in my first comment here, loader referencing itself (loader method as a listener) is definitely not sufficient to keep loader alive. –  Russ Jul 5 '11 at 13:17
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Well man, if your question was why the loader is alive out of scope, here is your answer:

In fact, the loader you see in the Class Constructor Method (CCM) is not the same you see in onComplete: LINE14: var loader:URLLoader = URLLoader(evt.target);

(I dont know why does people like to put same name to variables, that can be confusing, but it is not in the case now that i will explain)

The magic lies in the evt.target. But you should be asking yourself: "What does the .target do?" Well it is a instance variable defined by the "Event Object", and it provides reference to the "Target Object".

If you dont know what a "Event Target" is, read this paragraph. The "Event Target" is the object in which the listener registered at LINE9: loader.addEventListener(Event.COMPLETE, onComplete); As you can see, it is the loader at the CCM (please dont confuse the loader names) which refers to new URLLoader();. Paragraph Conclusion: the "Event Target" is the URLLoader object referenced by the load local variable at the CCM.

Well, using the .target variable you can have reference to the URLLoader object and then use the reference as you want. In the case, you used the reference to remove the listener. It is okay.

Here is a improved version (just one instance variable that provides reference hapily to URLLoader):

package {
    import flash.display.Sprite;
    import flash.events.*;
    import flash.net.*;

    public class URLLoaderExample extends Sprite {
        private var lalala:URLLoader;
        public function URLLoaderExample() {
            lalala = new URLLoader();
            lalala.addEventListener(Event.COMPLETE, onComplete);
            lalala.load(new URLRequest("example.txt");
        }

        private function onComplete(evt:Event):void {
            trace ("Received data: " + lalala.data);
            lalala.removeEventListener(Event.COMPLETE, onComplete);
        }
    }
}

But just to make shure you arent confused with the names:

package {
    import flash.display.Sprite;
    import flash.events.*;
    import flash.net.*;

    public class URLLoaderExample extends Sprite {
        public function URLLoaderExample() {
            var blabla:URLLoader = new URLLoader();
            blabla.addEventListener(Event.COMPLETE, onComplete);
            blabla.load(new URLRequest("example.txt");
        } // 'loader' fell out of scope here! and it fell look there

        private function onComplete(evt:Event):void {
            var phopho:URLLoader = URLLoader(evt.target);
            trace ("Received data: " + phopho.data);
            loader.removeEventListener(Event.COMPLETE, onComplete);
        }
    }
}

Cheers... If you have any doubts at the casting operation used at URLLoader(evt.target); you can ask.

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I don't understand your confusion. The loader variable does go out of scope (as in, the reference you were pointing to in memory is not longer needed). However, because there's still a reference to an external event listener, the loader itself is not GC'ed, which is why you can continue to get the reference of the loader (in the handler, it's getting the target) and will not be eligible for GC until the event listener is removed.

EDIT: Sorry, I should of been more clear on the matter. I should of had more coffee. When I mean 'external', I mean things like loaders since they're dependent on a browser action. Now, I can't say this for sure since I've never seen the underlying code for Flash Player, but my suspicion is that if you have any Loader type classes that needs to interact with the browser, there will be an underlining reference (from the player to the loader) which will stop it from being GC'ed. This is why that you should always unload your Loaders or so, this is my understanding of the Flash Player. I could be wrong, but I've done several tests in the past and I've never seen an external listener (in this case Loaders, but I'm wondering if there's any other external listeners that might happen with Air) get GC without being explicit.

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Please see links I provided above. Main thing to note is that An inactive object is one that no longer has any references to it from other active objects. So, if object itself has references to something external, it does not prevent this object to be removed from the memory. Object has to have some references TO it to stay alive. –  Nox Noctis Jul 5 '11 at 16:12
    
@J_A_X: After a lot of study, I'm with Nox Noctis on this one. When you say "because there's still a reference to an external event listener", you need to ask yourself (as I did) where that reference you are referring to is. It isn't "external" as you say. That reference is actually on loader itself, and when loader falls out of scope, so does the self-reference. So it can be GC'd. Although I'm willing to be convinced otherwise :). If only we could see the behind-the-scenes source code on this... :( –  Russ Jul 5 '11 at 16:28
1  
Yeah, wouldn't be surprised if it got fixed in a later version of Flash Player. They have been doing considerable changes to the underlying memory allocation/GC code. –  J_A_X Jul 5 '11 at 21:03
2  
@Russ, Flash Player provides a set of API, either for internal operations or external (like retrieving information from an HTTP request). That HTTP request is not handles by Flash Player, it's handled by the browser. As such, any classes withing Flash that references an external request (any loaders for HTTP request and Timer is based on your OS' timer), the Flash Player will hold a 'secret' reference to it in memory, hence the GC will not collect it. Clearer? –  J_A_X Jul 7 '11 at 13:31
2  
@Russ, OS graphics are 'write only', I/O is event based Flash Player listening to OS, then dispatching internally. From what I've been told, only Loaders and Timers have a secret reference because of how it works with the OS. I agree about explicit references, you should always do that, but it's good to know about the underlying reason why some of these objects might not GC :) –  J_A_X Jul 7 '11 at 14:20
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