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Consider the following code snippet.

template <T>
MyPtr<T> CreateObject()
{
    // Do something here first...

    // return our new object
    return MyPtr<T>(new T());
}

class Foo
{
private:
    Foo() { }

public:
    static MyPtr<Foo> GetNewInstance() 
    {
        // ERROR: Foo is private...
        return CreateObject<Foo>();
    }
};

class Bar
{
public:
    Bar() { }
};

int main()
{
    MyPtr<Bar> bar = CreateObject<Bar>();

    return 0;
}

Without resorting to macro for CreateObject (I like the syntax of MyPtr<type> obj = CreateObject<type>(params)), is there a way to make the function CreateObject share the same context as the caller function, thus able to access private Foo c'tor? 'friend' is not what I'm looking for as it would mean anyone calling CreateObject would have access to private Foo c'tor, which is not what I want. Overloading the new operator wouldn't work either as it is imperative that a MyPtr is returned instead of just T* (by assigning T* to MyPtr assigns a type to the object that is required somewhere else).

I guess what I'm looking for is something in between a macro and a template function (syntax of a template function but gets expanded fully like a macro). It would be quite useful to have this feature in this particular case.

share|improve this question
    
Wah? This is exactly what friend is for. How would you create an object without having access to its constructor? – Xeo Jul 5 '11 at 7:08
    
What keeps you from implementing Foo::GetNewInstance() as return new MyPtr<Foo>(new Foo())?. I can't see that CreateObject() makes much sence here, really. – larsmoa Jul 5 '11 at 7:11
    
Like I said in the OP, I don't want caller of CreateObject to be able to access Foo unless it's within Foo itself... – Zach Saw Jul 5 '11 at 7:15
    
@lasrm: The sample code is obviously just there to illustrate the problem I'm facing. – Zach Saw Jul 5 '11 at 7:16
    
@Xeo: Like I said, it would be quite useful to have this feature in the standard -- as explained by my OP. – Zach Saw Jul 5 '11 at 7:25
up vote 3 down vote accepted

This is basically the same as attempting to use make_shared with a private constructor.

The only way to allow this is with friend. You're pretty much stuck in this case I'm afraid.

share|improve this answer
    
Another restriction in the C++ language. Oh well, just as I thought. – Zach Saw Jul 5 '11 at 7:10
    
@Zach Saw - I believe you can make just the one instantiation of the function a friend. – Chris Lutz Jul 5 '11 at 7:13
    
Seeing that there are obviously genuine use-cases that require this feature, is the C++ committee aware of this shortcoming? – Zach Saw Jul 5 '11 at 7:13
    
@Chris Lutz: Care to elaborate? Like I said in the OP, I don't want caller of CreateObject to be able to access Foo unless it's within Foo itself... – Zach Saw Jul 5 '11 at 7:14
    
@Zach: I think this kind of thing is exceedingly rare, and I don't see how it could really be worked around. C++ already gets bashed quite often because it allows anything like friend in the first place. It's more than you get in pretty much every other OO language... – Billy ONeal Jul 5 '11 at 7:15

Well, you could do that with the passkey pattern:

template<class T, class PassKey>
MyPtr<T> CreateObject(PassKey const& key)
{
  return new T(key);
}

class FooKey{
private:
  FooKey(){} // private ctor
  FooKey(const FooKey&); // undefined private copy ctor

  friend class Foo;
};

class Foo{
public:
  // public ctor
  Foo(FooKey const&){}

  static MyPtr<Foo> GetNewInstance() 
  {
    return CreateObject<Foo>(FooKey());
  }
};

Example at Ideone.

With C++0x, this can be done much easier than creating a new Key struct every time, since template parameters are now allowed to be friends:

template<class T>
struct PassKey{
private:
  PassKey(){}
  PassKey(const PassKey<T>&);

  friend T;
};
share|improve this answer
    
A good workaround. – Zach Saw Jul 5 '11 at 7:41
    
@Zach: And you can have an overloaded version of CreateObject that doesn't take a key, for classes that are publicly creatable. – Xeo Jul 5 '11 at 7:45
    
In non C++bleedingEdge you could use macros to similar effect, though perhaps your coworkers would crucify you. – Chris Lutz Jul 5 '11 at 7:46
    
@Chris: For what part exactly? If you mean for the creation of the structs, well, use macros where macros are useful. :P – Xeo Jul 5 '11 at 7:47
    
@Xeo - That's what I meant. I think it's a valid use of macros, but some people are unreasonably allergic to macros. – Chris Lutz Jul 5 '11 at 19:04

I am not sure as to what you are trying to achieve. The simplification to post the problem here has taken away the actual need for the whole thing. So I will just assume that you know what you are doing, and that you really need this (and I suggest that you rethink whether you do need it, as I don't see a point...)

At any rate, you can solve the problem by passing a creator callback to the CreateObject template:

template <typename T, typename Creator>
MyPtr<T> CreateObject( Creator creator )
{
    // Do something here first...
    return MyPtr<T>(creator());
}
class Foo
{
private:
    Foo() {}
    static Foo* create() { return new Foo(); }
public:
    static MyPtr<Foo> GetNewInstance() {
        return CreateObject<Foo>( &Foo:create );
    }
// ...
};

The actual issue though, is what does Do something here first actually does that forces you into this complex creation patterns. The fact that it has to be executed before the creation of the new object seems to indicate that there are hidden dependencies not shown in the code, and that usually end up in maintenance nightmares, where someone down the line reorders some code, or adds a new constructor and everything seems to fall apart. Revisit your design and consider whether those dependencies can be simplified or made explicit.

share|improve this answer
    
It's something like boost::make_shared, except it's make gc object in my case. – Zach Saw Jul 5 '11 at 8:03
    
It wouldn't be any more of a maintenance nightmare than Boost. – Zach Saw Jul 5 '11 at 8:26
    
@Zach Saw: They are not exactly the same. Nothing in boost requires you to execute code prior to calling the new operator. You can use make_shared, but you can also allocate in the stack or dynamically into a raw pointer or even a shared_ptr. Also, the code in make_shared does show the dependency, the object is built in place with placement new over a piece of memory that is allocated before in the same function, which is something that is missing from your question. The dependency would be shown if you had done: CreateObject() { /*...*/ return new( buffer ) T(); }, for example – David Rodríguez - dribeas Jul 5 '11 at 8:38
    
There is an obvious dependency shown in the code above: you cannot use placement new before the buffer is allocated. Note that I have not said that your design is wrong, only that you should consider it, as with the information present in the question it did not seem required. That is what I was referring above with the simplification to post the problem has taken away the actual need for the whole thing. – David Rodríguez - dribeas Jul 5 '11 at 8:40
    
It's not quite as straight forward as that in my case. C++ Builder wouldn't allow placement new on TObjects (delphi derived objects), thus requiring me to workaround that by doing that extra something before new T; It's not exactly the same as make_shared, but extremely close. – Zach Saw Jul 5 '11 at 8:42

Since you are newing up the object in the very end it really doesn't relate to your CreateObject function. So Change the function prototype to:

template <typename T>
MyPtr<T> CreateObject(T* const p)
{
  //...
  return MyPtr<T>(p);
}

Usage:

static MyPtr<Foo> GetNewInstance() 
{
  return CreateObject(new Foo());
}
share|improve this answer
    
How does that solve the problem? – Billy ONeal Jul 5 '11 at 7:10
    
What about the // Do something here first... code? – Zach Saw Jul 5 '11 at 7:11
    
isn't Foo constructor private? – Donotalo Jul 5 '11 at 7:12
    
@iammilind: Ah, after your edit it now makes sense. – Billy ONeal Jul 5 '11 at 7:13
    
@ZachSaw, your // Do something ... has nothing to do with the new T(). So you can pass it externally. See my edited post. – iammilind Jul 5 '11 at 7:15

is there a way to make the function CreateObject share the same context as the caller function

Yes, pass the context you need as an argument (either as an argument to the template, or as an argument to the function).

In practice, move the new T call to a separate function (or struct template, as I chose to do here), like this:

// Dummy representation of your pointer type
template <typename T>
struct MyPtr
{
    MyPtr( T *p ) { }
};

// Default constructor template; may be specialized to not use "new" or so.
template <typename T>
struct Constructor
{
    static T *invoke() { return new T; }
};

// Needs to be a struct (or class) so 'C' can have a default value
template <typename T, typename C = Constructor<T> >
struct CreateObject
{
    MyPtr<T> operator()() {
        return MyPtr<T>( C::invoke() );
    }
};

class Foo
{
private:
    friend struct Constructor<Foo>;
    Foo() { }

public:
    static MyPtr<Foo> GetNewInstance() 
    {
        return CreateObject<Foo>()();
    }
};

If you want to handle different constructor signatures (read: if not all types T have the same constructor signature), you could also choose to not pass the Constructor as a template to the CreateObject struct, but instead use a function argument. That way, you could 'load' a Constructor like this:

// ...
static MyPtr<Foo> GetNewInstance() 
{
     Constructor<Foo> c( arg1, arg2, arg3 );
     return CreateObject<Foo>( c );
}
share|improve this answer
1  
So, now I can do Foo* p = Constructor<Foo>::invoke();. – Xeo Jul 5 '11 at 7:48
    
@Xeo: Exactly; the Constructor factors the new T part out of the CreateObject function. – Frerich Raabe Jul 5 '11 at 10:15
    
Ahm, yes, and it was the goal to disallow what I wrote above outside of the Foo::GetNewInstance function. You didn't solve that, only moved the problem to another function. – Xeo Jul 5 '11 at 10:26

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