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I have some markup, like so...

<div id="items">
    <div class="item"></div>
    <div class="item"></div>
    <div class="item"></div>
    <div class="item"></div>
</div>

I want to write some functions to affect each one using jQuery. Something like...

$(".item").click(function(i){
    i.hide();
});

Can someone give me a brief explanation how to make this work? Should I use .each()?

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7 Answers 7

up vote 1 down vote accepted

it works too without the each

$(".item").click(function() {
   $(this).hide();
});
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you can do this :)

$(".item").live('click',function(){
    $(this).hide();
});
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Any reason you changed click (or equivalent bind) to live? That changes the behaviour (live makes it so it will automatically bind to anything matching that selector into the future), so you should have a good reason to do that. –  mgiuca Jul 5 '11 at 7:26
    
Also you don't need the $(...) around this (this is already a jQuery object). –  mgiuca Jul 5 '11 at 7:30
    
Actually, ignore what I said about $. I don't know how it worked for me, but it apparently didn't work for others, and the documentation tells you to explicitly wrap with $. –  mgiuca Jul 5 '11 at 7:35
    
First I personally think $(..) is required, second I use .live more often given it's disadvantages but I never said my solution was the best :) but on @float's problems my solution worked fine :) –  Carls Jr. Jul 5 '11 at 7:44

(a) The documentation is clear on what the event handlers do.

(b) Like most jquery methods (and the exceptions all state specifically that they are exceptions), .click will be applied to each member of the set selected by the jquery object. So, no, you don't need to use .each if you want each of them to have the same function installed as the event handler.

(c) this or event.currentTarget (or in your example, i.currentTarget) is the way to access the dom node which is the recipient of the event. i in your example will be the event object.

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$('.item').each(function(index){
    $(this).bind('click', function(){
        $(this).hide();
        //alert("hiding item nr: "+index);
    });
});
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Unless I'm mistaken, you don't need each because jQuery automatically applies the action to each of the elements matched. You only need each if you actually want to loop over the elements (for example, if you wanted to alert each element, as shown in the example on the each documentation). Also, you don't need .bind('click', ...); using .click(...) as the OP had is sufficient, and cleaner. –  mgiuca Jul 5 '11 at 7:23
    
yes I know. I just thought, maybe one want to know the index. therefor the alert is as comment. And the bind('click',... I am using for the reason of better readability... I am not doing this since yesterday mgiuca :-) –  helle Jul 5 '11 at 9:06

Yes, you can use each, like this:

$(".item").each(function(){
   //Here, use $(this) to reference current element 
   $(this).hide();
});

.each() applies the function you pass to every element in the matched selector, referencing with this the current element.

It has optional parameters and other things. Here you can learn more: http://api.jquery.com/jQuery.each/

Hope this helps. Cheers

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That will hide each item, rather than setting a click event handler on each item as the code in the question is attempting to do. –  mgiuca Jul 5 '11 at 7:24

This hopefully does what you want. Let us know if that works, hope that helps.

$(".item").each(function(){
     $(this).click(function () {
         $(this).hide();
     });
});
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You want to use $(this) instead of i inside the handler function. The argument to the handler is an event object, which contains information about the event (such as the mouse coordinates where it was clicked, and other stuff). Probably somewhere in i is the object that was clicked, but you can access "whichever object was clicked" much more easily using this.

You don't have to use each because jQuery automatically binds the handler to each of the elements matched by the query ".item".

$(".item").click(function(i){
    $(this).hide();
});

Edit: Added $(...) around this, as instructed in the documentation. (For some reason, it worked for me without the $, but apparently you need it.)

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2  
I couldn't get just this to work, only $(this) –  fancy Jul 5 '11 at 7:33
    
@float Hmm, well it worked for me, but the documentation says you are correct, so I changed my answer. –  mgiuca Jul 5 '11 at 7:37
1  
It's IMPOSSIBLE that it worked without $(), cause div dom elment doesn't have a native hide() method –  Edgar Villegas Alvarado Jul 5 '11 at 7:48
    
@Edgar: Ouch, yeah I tried it again and it didn't work without $. No idea what was going on. Mea culpa. –  mgiuca Jul 5 '11 at 7:56
    
@mgiuca Don't worry, it happens :D –  Edgar Villegas Alvarado Jul 5 '11 at 8:01

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