Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.
typedef struct {
  unsigned char a,
  unsigned char b, 
  unsigned char c
}type_a;

typedef struct {
 unsigned char e,
 unsigned char f[2]
}type_b;

type_a sample;
sample.a = 1;
sample.b = 2;
sample.c = 3;

How do I typecast it and assign new value like:

sample = (type_b)sample; // syntax error
sample.f[1] = 'a';
share|improve this question
    
There is not reason for not trying out yourself if your question is already "Can I do XXX by: <example>". If you have that example ready, why don't you run it? It would be different if you'd ask "how can I" or "is it legal to". –  phresnel Jul 5 '11 at 8:27
    
Maybe I should change my question to "can this be done". I already know that is a syntax error. Sorry to incite your bejesus –  user3237 Jul 5 '11 at 8:38
    
This would indeed be a difference. Generally, avoiding yes/no-questions is not a bad thing on forums+co. –  phresnel Jul 5 '11 at 8:51

5 Answers 5

up vote 1 down vote accepted

You can't cast one data type to another incompatible data type. However, the memory is open for you. You can access it as follows:

typedef struct
{
  unsigned char a;
  unsigned char b; 
  unsigned char c;
}type_a;

typedef struct
{
 unsigned char e;
 unsigned char f[2];
}type_b;

type_a sample;
sample.a = 1;
sample.b = 2;
sample.c = 3;

type_b *sample_b = (type_b *) ((void*) &sample);

Try out yourself accessing sample_b->e and sample_b->f and see what happens.

share|improve this answer

You should really try it out yourself.

sample = (type_b)sample; /* Can't cast a structure to
                            another structure. */

sample.f[1] = 'a'; /* sample is still of type type_a,
                      and doesn't have an `f` field. */
share|improve this answer

No - C types are static, which means that sample will always remain of type type_a. However, you can achieve what you want using unions:

union {
    type_a as_a;
    type_b as_b;
} sample;

sample.as_a.a = 1;
sample.as_a.b = 2;
sample.as_a.c = 3;

sample.as_b.f[1] = 'a';

Note that it is not usual to create an object that is a bare union type like this; normally you would include the union within a struct, that includes a tag so that you know what type the object is at the present time:

struct {
    enum { TYPE_A, TYPE_B } type;
    union {
        type_a as_a;
        type_b as_b;
    } data;
} sample;

/* sample is a TYPE_A right now */
sample.type = TYPE_A;
sample.data.as_a.a = 1;
sample.data.as_a.b = 2;
sample.data.as_a.c = 3;

/* sample is now a TYPE_B */
sample.type = TYPE_B;
sample.data.as_b.f[1] = 'a';
share|improve this answer

No. You can do it by casting pointers: value_b = *((value_b*)&value_a) or by creating union of those two types.

However you do it, be careful. Structures can have different data alignment and you may get unexpected results.

share|improve this answer

yes you can copy the value of the type_a into type_b by trying something like

type_b sample_b =*((type_b*)&sample);

or

memcpy(&sample_b,&sample,sizeof(type_a));

Typecasting is nothing but converting an expression of one type to another one. But you seem to be trying to convert the type itself, which is fixed at compile time(variable declaration)

Its not clear the idea behind trying something like this. If you can make it more clear, people would be able to give more insights

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.