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I have an array list containing 5 bulbs. I can iterate throuh them like this

for(Bulb bul : list){
    System.out.println(bul.id);
}

No a bulb is switched off/on. The effect is that its neighbourg bulbs a switch too.

My problem is that when the last or 4th bulb are switched I need to determine its neighbours. Since I have 5 bulbs this would work.

int bulbIdClicked = 3;

if(bul.id == (bulbIdClicked + 1)%5)

if(bul.id == (bulbIdClicked - 1)%5)

For 3 it would give me 2 and 4 as neighbours. But when 4 is switched it gives me 3 and 0 ans neighbours where 0 should be 5.

How can I solve that problem?

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6 Answers 6

up vote 1 down vote accepted

If you have a bulb ID ranging from 0 to 4, the best way to get the next and previous IDs is to use:

next = (id + 1) % 5
prev = (id + 4) % 5

This is language-agnostic since not all languages treat modulus operators on negative numbers the same. You can see that stepping forward 4 from 4 (for example) gives you: 0, 1, 2, 3 which is the same as a step backwards.

However. modulus really only works on zero-based values. Since you have one-based values, you can subtract one first, do the relevant addition/modulo, then add one again.

next = ((id - 1) + 1) % 5 + 1
prev = ((id - 1) + 4) % 5 + 1

These simplify down to:

next = id % 5 + 1
prev = (id + 3) % 5 + 1

Using those formula, you get:

id  next  prev
--  ----  ----
 1    2     5
 2    3     1
 3    4     2
 4    5     3
 5    1     4

as expected.

That's about as optimised as you're likely to get without a lookup table. You can use the same approach for any roll-over size (not just 5), you just have to change the modulo and what you add.

If the indexes range from 1 to N, its:

next = id % [N] + 1
prev = (id + [N-2]) % [N] + 1

where the figures inside [] are constant based on the number of indexes.

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excellent thanks –  artworkad シ Jul 5 '11 at 8:45

If it should go from 0 to 5 you should use %6

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it should go from 1 to 5 –  artworkad シ Jul 5 '11 at 8:11
    
Then you should use %5 but lower your index with 1 since your list is zero-based (0-4). –  wjans Jul 5 '11 at 8:14

the array index starts from 0, so if you have 5 elements, then they are in position 0,1,2,3,4..

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By using 0..4 as your bulb IDs instead of 1..5. This is in fact the main reason why programmers prefer zero-based counting: it simplifies indexing.

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Check whether this is the last bulb. The last bulb will have only the left neighbor

if(bul.id == numBulbs)
{
   //Check only left side
   if(bul.id == (bulbIdClicked - 1)%5)
   ...
}

You have do the same for the first bulb

if(bul.id == 0)
{
   //Check only right side
   if(bul.id == (bulbIdClicked + 1)%5)
   ...
}
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If you need to navigate a List backwards and forwards, use ListIterator (available through the list.listIterator() or list.listIterator(index) methods. Here's some sample code:

List<Bulb> bulbs = new ArrayList<Bulb>();
int amount = 500;
for(int i = 0; i < amount; i++){bulbs.add(new Bulb());}
// which one to switch off
int offset = new Random().nextInt(amount);
ListIterator<Bulb> li = bulbs.listIterator(offset);
li.next().switchOff();
if(li.hasNext()){
    li.next().switchOff();
    // go back to selected offset
    li.previous();
}
if(li.hasPrevious()){
    li.previous().switchOff();
}
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