Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I'm trying to get all substrings matched with a multiplier:

$list = '1,2,3,4';
preg_match_all('|\d+(,\d+)*|', $list, $matches);
print_r($matches);

This example returns, as expected, the last match in [1]:

Array
(
    [0] => Array
        (
            [0] => 1,2,3,4
        )

    [1] => Array
        (
            [0] => ,4
        )

)

However, I would like to get all strings matched by (,\d+), to get something like:

Array
(
    [0] => ,2
    [1] => ,3
    [2] => ,4
)

Is there a way to do this with a single function such as preg_match_all()?

share|improve this question
2  
Different language, but same answer as stackoverflow.com/questions/6571106 : you can't, but you can easily split by ,. –  Kobi Jul 5 '11 at 8:40
    
@Kobi: thank you for the link. From what they say, there are solutions in some languages, any hope for PHP or is it a definitive answer? –  Benjamin Jul 5 '11 at 8:50
    
[0] => ,2 is not possible with PHP. is ,2 a string or is it a number? –  Oltarus Jul 5 '11 at 8:51
1  
No. As far as I know, PHP has no support for captures of the same group, if you do insist on a whole-regex solution. –  Kobi Jul 5 '11 at 8:52
1  
Thank you Kobi. If you had an answer, I would accept it :-) –  Benjamin Jul 5 '11 at 9:08
show 1 more comment

5 Answers

up vote 3 down vote accepted

According to Kobi (see comments above):

PHP has no support for captures of the same group

Therefore this question has no solution.

share|improve this answer
add comment

Why not just:

$ar = explode(',', $list);
print_r($ar);
share|improve this answer
    
The example above is a simplification, the regexp is actually more complicated than that. I know how to do it the verbose way, I'm just curious to know whether there is a shorter path to the solution. –  Benjamin Jul 5 '11 at 9:06
    
WOW. good solution in some cases, when regex is not needed. –  taztodgmail Feb 28 at 9:11
add comment

You can't, use a split on , (as Kobi said).

share|improve this answer
add comment

Splitting is only an option when the character to split isn't used in the patterns to match itself. I had a situation where a badly formatted comma separated line has to be parsed into any of a number of known options.

i.e. options '1,2', '2', '2,3' subject '1,2,3'.

Splitting on ',' will result in '1', '2', and '3'; only one ('2') of which is a valid match, this happens because the separator is also part of the options.

The naïve regex would be something like '~^(1,2|2|2,3)(?:,(1,2|2|2,3))*$~i', but this runs into the problem of same-group captures.

My "solution" was to just expand the regex to match the maximum number of matches possible: '~^(1,2|2|2,3)(?:,(1,2|2|2,3))?(?:,(1,2|2|2,3))?$~i' (if more options were available, just repeat the '(?:,(1,2|2|2,3))?' bit. This does result in empty string results for "unused" matches.

It's not the cleanest solution, but works when you have to deal with badly formatted input data.

share|improve this answer
add comment
preg_match_all('/(\d+)/', $list, $matches);
share|improve this answer
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.