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I have installed lapack++ 2.5.4 with ATLAS 3.8.4 on Fedora 12.

I wrote a simple program to test lapack++ using eclipse.

I set these paths in eclipse:

include path: /trunk/lapack/lapackpp-2.5.4/include

libraries: lapackpp

library paths: /usr/local/lib

#include <stdio.h>
#include <lapackpp.h>
#include <iostream>

using namespace std;
using namespace la;

int main(int argc, char* argv[])
{
    int row = 3;
    int col = 3;

    LaGenMatDouble A(row,col);
    int k=0;
    for(int i=0;i<row;i++){
        for(int j=0;j<col;j++){
            A(i,j)=k++;
        }
    }
    cout << A <<endl;
    return 0;
}

It builds without errors, but when I try to run it, it spits out

workspace/lapack_test/Debug/lapack_test: error while loading shared libraries: liblapackpp.so.14: cannot open shared object file: No such file or directory

I have been trying to search for a solution, but i cannot seem to find one. I tried including -lg2c, but the compiler cannot find it. Please help.

share|improve this question
    
When i access /usr/local/lib there is some symbolic links: liblapackpp.la liblapackpp.so liblapackpp.so.14 liblapackpp.so.14.2.0 – user506146 Jul 5 '11 at 9:05
    
Could you run ldd on the compiled executable and post the results? It is probably that the link loader doesn't find those libraries because /usr/local/lib is not in the search path. – talonmies Jul 5 '11 at 9:26
    
I figured out that if i set "export LD_LIBRARY_PATH=/usr/local/lib", the program is able to link properly and output the answer. But I was wondering whether is it safe to set the LD_LIBRARY_PATH to /usr/local/lib? – user506146 Jul 5 '11 at 9:59
    
It is safe (and how things should be done in GNU systems), with caveats. In particular, if you set it permanently, every application will search that path for libraries. If you happen to have two different versions of a library installed (one in /usr/local the other in /usr), then you might get version conflicts and unpredictable behaviour. But otherwise you should be fine. – talonmies Jul 5 '11 at 10:05

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