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I have XML like

<root>
    <a>One</a>
    <a>Two</a>
    <b>Three</b>
    <c>Four</c>
    <a>Five</a>
    <b>
        <a>Six</a>
    </b>
</root>

and need to select the last occurrence of any child node name in root. In this case, the desired resulting list would be:

<c>Four</c>
<a>Five</a>
<b>
    <a>Six</a>
</b>

Any help is appreciated!

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1  
I don't think this is possible using a single XPath 1.0 one-liner. –  Emiliano Poggi Jul 5 '11 at 13:03
    
Good question, +1. See my amswer for a complete, short and dramatically more efficient solution than the currently selected one. Explanation is also provided. –  Dimitre Novatchev Jul 6 '11 at 1:25
    
Also added a very short XPath 2.0 one-liner. –  Dimitre Novatchev Jul 6 '11 at 1:45
    
This turned good question with good answers +1 –  Emiliano Poggi Jul 6 '11 at 4:19

4 Answers 4

up vote 3 down vote accepted

XSLT based solution:

<?xml version="1.0" encoding="UTF-8"?>
<xsl:stylesheet xmlns:xsl="http://www.w3.org/1999/XSL/Transform" version="1.0">
    <xsl:output method="xml" indent="yes" omit-xml-declaration="yes"/>
    <xsl:strip-space elements="*"/>

    <xsl:template match="root/*">
        <xsl:variable name="n" select="name()"/>
        <xsl:copy-of
            select=".[not(following-sibling::node()[name()=$n])]"/>
    </xsl:template>
</xsl:stylesheet>

Produced output:

<c>Four</c>
<a>Five</a>
<b>
   <a>Six</a>
</b>

Second solution (you can use it as single XPath expression):

<xsl:template match="/root">
    <xsl:copy-of select="a[not(./following-sibling::a)]
        | b[not(./following-sibling::b)]
        | c[not(./following-sibling::c)]"/>
</xsl:template>
share|improve this answer
1  
The proposed single XPath is not applicable in case of unknown children names or huge list of them. –  Emiliano Poggi Jul 5 '11 at 13:05
    
Thank you. Per @empo comment second XPath will not work in a general case but I have (begrudgingly) used XSLT solution and it works nicely. Single XPath query would be nice, cest la vie :) –  JJones56 Jul 5 '11 at 13:37
    
Good for you. Next time you may also think of adding the XSLT tag to the question ;-) ... so people may think of adding alternative answers. –  Emiliano Poggi Jul 5 '11 at 13:52
    
@empo: You're right. I didn't found general expression, so I posted as above. –  Grzegorz Szpetkowski Jul 5 '11 at 13:57
1  
@Grzegorz Szpetkowski: You might be interested to see another solution that on large XML documents is hundreds or even thousands of times faster than your solution. –  Dimitre Novatchev Jul 6 '11 at 1:29

Both the XPath 2.0 solution and the currently accepted answer are very inefficient (O(N^2)).

This solution has sublinear complexity:

<xsl:stylesheet version="1.0"
 xmlns:xsl="http://www.w3.org/1999/XSL/Transform">
 <xsl:output omit-xml-declaration="yes" indent="yes"/>
 <xsl:strip-space elements="*"/>

 <xsl:key name="kElemsByName" match="/*/*"
  use="name()"/>

 <xsl:template match="/">
  <xsl:copy-of select=
    "/*/*[generate-id()
         =
          generate-id(key('kElemsByName', name())[last()])
         ]"/>
 </xsl:template>
</xsl:stylesheet>

when applied on the provided XML document:

<root>
    <a>One</a>
    <a>Two</a>
    <b>Three</b>
    <c>Four</c>
    <a>Five</a>
    <b>
        <a>Six</a>
    </b>
</root>

the wanted, correct result is produced:

<c>Four</c>
<a>Five</a>
<b>
   <a>Six</a>
</b>

Explanation: This is a modified variant of Muenchian grouping -- so that not the first. but the last node in each group is processed.

II XPath 2.0 one-liner:

Use:

/*/*[index-of(/*/*/name(), name())[last()]]

Verification using XSLT 2.0 as the XPath 2.0 host:

<xsl:stylesheet version="2.0"
 xmlns:xsl="http://www.w3.org/1999/XSL/Transform">
 <xsl:output omit-xml-declaration="yes" indent="yes"/>

 <xsl:template match="/">
  <xsl:sequence select=
    "/*/*[index-of(/*/*/name(), name())[last()]]"/>
 </xsl:template>
</xsl:stylesheet>

When this transformation is applied on the same XML document (provided earlier), the same correct result is produced:

<c>Four</c>
<a>Five</a>
<b>
    <a>Six</a>
</b>
share|improve this answer
1  
+1. This answer must be upvoted because of its value respect to the others. –  Emiliano Poggi Jul 6 '11 at 4:15
    
apart reasoning about computational complexity of an expression, can you suggest some other XSLT technique to measure performance? –  Emiliano Poggi Jul 6 '11 at 4:17
2  
@empo: It isn't possible to conduct time measurements within XSLT alone. The standard XPath 2.0 functions for surrent time and current date-time produce always the same result any time they are referenced during the same transformation. This is because they are stable functions -- as all functions of a functional language must be. Of course, it is easy to do time measuring in the app that invokes an XSLT transformation. –  Dimitre Novatchev Jul 6 '11 at 4:43

If you can you XPath 2.0 this will work

/root//*[not(name() = following-sibling::*/name())]
share|improve this answer
1  
XPath 2.0 correct +1. In this case, you can write better /*/*[not(name() = following-sibling::*/name())]. –  Emiliano Poggi Jul 5 '11 at 13:04
    
Library does not support XPath 2.0 otherwise I would be happy to use this! (Should have specified) –  JJones56 Jul 5 '11 at 13:37
    
@empo - you are right of course, updated & thanks. –  cordsen Jul 5 '11 at 13:40

Nowadays, XSLT 2.0 offers grouping techniques for these kind of problems:

<xsl:stylesheet version="2.0"
    xmlns:xsl="http://www.w3.org/1999/XSL/Transform">
    <xsl:output omit-xml-declaration="yes" indent="yes" />
    <xsl:strip-space elements="*" />

    <xsl:template match="/root">
        <xsl:for-each-group select="*" group-by="name()">
            <!-- <xsl:sort select="index-of(/root/*, current-group()[last()])" order="ascending"/> -->
            <xsl:copy-of select="current-group()[last()]" />
        </xsl:for-each-group>
    </xsl:template>
</xsl:stylesheet>

will produce:

<a>Five</a>
<b>
  <a>Six</a>
</b>
<c>Four</c>

where grouping is done in document order unless explicitly influenced by <xsl:sort>!

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