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I have 2 classes. With the Generic Data Access class I can get the departments from the stored procedure GetDepartments. My problem is that in the Catalog Access class and especially in the public static DataTable ExecuteSelectCommand(DbCommand command)(execute a command and returns the results as a DataTable object) I dont know what I must write in the CATCH loop or how to leave it blank.Can anyone please help me to complete this part?Or maybe how can i change it without Try-catch.

using System;    
using System.Data;    
using System.Data.Common;    
using System.Configuration;    

public static class GenericDataAccess    
{    
  static GenericDataAccess()
  {

  }


  public static DataTable ExecuteSelectCommand(DbCommand command)    
  {    
    DataTable table;

    try    
    { 

      command.Connection.Open();    
      DbDataReader reader = command.ExecuteReader();    
      table = new DataTable();          
      table.Load(reader);          
      reader.Close();        
    }    
    catch (...)    
    {    
      ......
    }    
    finally    
    {         
      command.Connection.Close();    
    }

    return table;    
  }

  public static DbCommand CreateCommand()    
  {    
    string dataProviderName = BalloonShopConfiguration.DbProviderName;   
    string connectionString = BalloonShopConfiguration.DbConnectionString;

    DbProviderFactory factory = DbProviderFactories.GetFactory(dataProviderName);    
    DbConnection conn = factory.CreateConnection();

    conn.ConnectionString = connectionString;

    DbCommand comm = conn.CreateCommand();    
    comm.CommandType = CommandType.StoredProcedure;

    return comm;
  }
}

**The Catalog Access class:**

using System;    
using System.Data;    
using System.Data.Common;

public static class CatalogAccess    
{    
  static CatalogAccess()
  {

  }

  public static DataTable GetDepartments()    
  {    
    DbCommand comm = GenericDataAccess.CreateCommand();

    comm.CommandText = "GetDepartments";

    return GenericDataAccess.ExecuteSelectCommand(comm);    
  }    
}
share|improve this question
    
What do you want to do if an exception occurs in your ExecuteSelectCommand method? That will dictate what needs to go in to the catch block. –  DoctorMick Jul 5 '11 at 10:23
1  
The reader must be inside using. –  Aristos Jul 5 '11 at 10:25
    
Looks like Connection may be similarly leaked. –  Constantin Jul 5 '11 at 10:34

3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

If you don't know what to do or don't want to handle any exceptions, leave with catch out. This is valid:

try
{
    // code here
}
finally
{
    // cleanup here
}

..that way, any exceptions will be passed up to the method that called your method. If there is a problem (exception) in the try block, the method will exit, but not before any code in finally is executed.

share|improve this answer
    
when i try the second way which you proposed i have this error 'Cannot open database "BalloonShop" requested by the login. The login failed.'. And the error is in this line "command.Connection.Open();" –  dali1985 Jul 5 '11 at 10:50
    
@theo1985, probably the connection string you use is not correct. Check that you connect to the right database server and that server has BalloonShop database. –  Constantin Jul 5 '11 at 10:58

When dealing with exceptions, you have two options: you can handle them now when they're thrown, or you can let them bubble up the code and handle them later. Which is better depends on what exactly your program does.

How you handle it also depends on your code. Do you want to inform the user? Retry the connection? Both? Do nothing (bad!)? Lets say you just want to let the user know something bad happened. Then you'd do something like the following:

try{
    // breakable stuff
}catch(Exception e){
    System.Windows.Forms.MessageBox.Show("Something broke:  " + e.Message);
}finally{
    // clean up
}

If you want to deal with the exception further up (aka in the method that called this one), then do the following:

try{
    // breakable stuff
}catch{
    throw;
}finally{
    // clean up
}
share|improve this answer
    
catch { throw; } doesn't add anything of value, except maybe a line to put breakpoint on. But then it should probably be inside #if DEBUG section. –  Constantin Jul 5 '11 at 10:32
    
True, but it also doesn't hurt anything and IMO it makes it more readable and a bit clearer about what exactly is going on. –  Brian Kintz Jul 5 '11 at 10:35
    
Sorry about that :´( Once again, you are of course correct, but (as you also said) for the OP's code, cutting out a catch is about as useful performance-wise as removing all the comments to reduce compile time :D –  Brian Kintz Jul 5 '11 at 11:04
    
I did a better benchmark and didn't get any conclusive result. Oops. So I just removed my previous comment about performance. –  Constantin Jul 5 '11 at 11:10
    
I wouldn't be surprised if the compiler added the behind-the-scenes equivalent of catch { throw; } if it doesn't find a user-defined catch block (kinda like a default constructor), but I don't know that for sure and unfortunately don't have the time right now to to go research it... –  Brian Kintz Jul 5 '11 at 11:15

I'm not sure what to ask for, but I suspect that you want to don't handle the exception in your function and let it be propogated down the stack (i.e. let the caller handle it).

To achieve that you could just leave the catch-clause out of your code. The code below finally will still be called. If you wish to handle the exception in your function, but rethrow it before returning, try:

catch (MyException e)
{
   // Do stuff with e
   throw;
}
share|improve this answer
3  
You lose stack trace information with that. Far better is just throw; –  Kieren Johnstone Jul 5 '11 at 10:29
    
@Kieren: thx, edited my answer. –  larsm Jul 5 '11 at 10:59
    
Doing that will give you a compiler warning about unused variable e, so if all you're going to do it throw it again then catch { throw; } would be better. Or, if you don't mind the slight loss in readability, no catch block at all... –  Brian Kintz Jul 5 '11 at 11:10
    
@elmugrat: Not if // Do stuff with e actually does something. For the other case, just leaving the catch-clause out would be better as I noted in my answer (and you in your comment). –  larsm Jul 5 '11 at 12:45

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