Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

OK, this is driving me crazy:

First example, no problem:

<script>

window.myvar = 150;

if (false) {
  var myvar = 3;
}

// This will popup "150"
alert(myvar)

</script>

Now, with TWO script elements:

<script>

window.myvar = 150;

</script>

<script>

if (false) {
  var myvar = 3;
}

// This will popup "undefined"
alert(myvar)

</script>

Tested with IE8.

Have you any idea why?

share|improve this question
    
Can you please test if the code at tinypaste.com/49c80 shows the same error as above, so I can answer your question? I can't test because I'm not using my Windows box at the moment. Ad@m –  kirb Jul 5 '11 at 11:06
    
I wish I had IE8 to test right now. Sounds like myvar's definition is being hoisted and shadowing the property of window. –  alex Jul 5 '11 at 11:14
    
@adam that code tests OK in IE7/8, it alerts 100 –  clairesuzy Jul 5 '11 at 11:29
    
adam, nope. That does not exploit the bug/feature. –  Claudio Jul 5 '11 at 11:30
    
I see... So it must be something to do with the if(false){} block, because I didn't add it in the code above. Ad@m –  kirb Jul 5 '11 at 11:38

5 Answers 5

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Inside the second example, in your second script block, myvar has been hoisted (as per the spec) to the top of the containing scope. Remember JavaScript does not have block scope, only function scope.

Therefore, var myvar (the hoisted definition that is interpreted) is going to lead to myvar being undefined when the alert() looks up myvar on the VariableObject.

share|improve this answer
    
still not clear , what is hoisted? –  sushil bharwani Jul 5 '11 at 11:08
    
@sushil I added a link that helpfully explains hoisting in more detail. –  alex Jul 5 '11 at 11:35
    
thank you, now it's clear. Don't know why it works differently on other browser though –  Claudio Jul 5 '11 at 11:37

That's because since javascript does scope based on function levels, your code computes/compiles/equivalent to the following:

<script>

window.myvar = 150;

</script>

<script>
var myvar;

if (false) {
  myvar = 3;
}

// This will popup "undefined"
alert(myvar)

</script>
share|improve this answer
    
OK, so this has something to do with variable hoisting. Seems only on IE, though. –  Claudio Jul 5 '11 at 11:36
    
jsbin example: jsbin.com/upexat/6/edit#source and another version jsbin.com/upexat/8/edit#source –  Ajaxe Jul 5 '11 at 12:42

There's a bit more too it than Alex said (even though he just referenced my article - thanks!).

If the code sequence was in the sequence it appears, "var myVar" would not get hoisted (or rather its hoisting would have no effect) because "window.myvar = 150" is defined first (moreover this wouldn't explain why the first example worked and the second one only failed in IE)

It looks like the second script is (somehow) loading before the first one - but only in IE8. You can simulate switching the tag sequence and you will see undefined alert in all browsers

var myvar;

if (false) {
  myvar = 3;
}

alert(myvar)

window.myvar = 150;
share|improve this answer

This doesn't happen to me in iOS Safari on 4.3.1, so it might be a bug in IE. However, @alex's answer may also be true as well. Ad@m

share|improve this answer

I am for hoisting, as alex said. The compiler sees that you define myvar in your block (var myvar inside if) and hoists the previously known myvar. I am not sure, whether it is bug or feature, though.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.