Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Does SCP have a problem setting file permissions or have I misconfiguration my server?

Updated (19/Mar/09): Actually: There is no problem - I have just misunderstood the way permissions work - they don't change when the file contents are changed

Use case:

There is a file on a server that I want to edit called "importantFile.txt". The file has owner and group of "master":

ls -l importantFile.txt:
-rw-rw-r--  1 master master     7 Mar 18 08:11 importantFile.txt

I am called "slave" but luckily, I am in group "master" so I can edit the file as I see fit. However, I'm a lazy slave and can't be bothered to edit the file on the server, I'd prefer to edit the file on my local machine and SCP it to the server:

echo "bored slave info" > importantFile.txt
scp importantFile.txt slave@theServerAddress:/pathToFile/importantFile.txt

If I do this, the contents of the file on the server are uploaded fine and the timestamp of the file is updated but the permissions of the file don't change, the file is still owned by "master". This is a problem because if "slave" uploaded bad content, no one would know it was "slave" who caused the problem, "master" would look guilty.

Perhaps I have to set a umask? if so where? I tried .bash_profile without success and haven't found anything on Google about umask in /etc/ssh/sshd_config.

share|improve this question
    
not programming related? –  Douglas Leeder Mar 18 '09 at 13:05
    
This isn't a programming question, really. But this is working exactly as expected; just because you write to a file does not mean you now own it. –  derobert Mar 18 '09 at 13:21
add comment

4 Answers 4

up vote 1 down vote accepted

That's nothing special about scp - try logging on to the server as slave, and editing the file using your favourite text editor... You'll find the same behaviour occurs... Writing to a file does not make you the owner of the file.


Example:

as root

#cd /tmp
#mkdir fubar
#chgrp vboxusers fubar
#cd fubar/
#touch testfile
#chgrp vboxusers testfile 
#chmod g+w . testfile
#ls -al
total 16
drwxrwxr-x  2 root vboxusers  4096 2009-03-19 10:30 .
drwxrwxrwt 15 root root      12288 2009-03-19 10:29 ..
-rw-rw-r--  1 root vboxusers     0 2009-03-19 10:30 testfile
#echo foo > testfile 
#ls -al
total 20
drwxrwxr-x  2 root vboxusers  4096 2009-03-19 10:30 .
drwxrwxrwt 15 root root      12288 2009-03-19 10:29 ..
-rw-rw-r--  1 root vboxusers     4 2009-03-19 10:30 testfile

as user (in vboxusers group)

>cd /tmp/fubar
>ls -al
total 20
drwxrwxr-x  2 root vboxusers  4096 2009-03-19 10:30 .
drwxrwxrwt 15 root root      12288 2009-03-19 10:29 ..
-rw-rw-r--  1 root vboxusers     4 2009-03-19 10:30 testfile
>echo bar >> testfile 
>ls -al
total 20
drwxrwxr-x  2 root vboxusers  4096 2009-03-19 10:30 .
drwxrwxrwt 15 root root      12288 2009-03-19 10:29 ..
-rw-rw-r--  1 root vboxusers     8 2009-03-19 10:31 testfile
>vim testfile
>ls -al
total 20
drwxrwxr-x  2 root vboxusers  4096 2009-03-19 10:31 .
drwxrwxrwt 15 root root      12288 2009-03-19 10:31 ..
-rw-rw-r--  1 root vboxusers    12 2009-03-19 10:31 testfile
>cat testfile 
foo
bar
baz
share|improve this answer
    
I did try this and I found writing to the file does make me the owner (and group) of the file. In fact, the only way to keep the group of the original file the same was to change the "set-groupID" flag in of the parent directory (find . -type d -exec chmod g+s {} \;) –  Tom Mar 18 '09 at 15:14
    
Writing to a new file? or Writing to an existing file? –  Stobor Mar 18 '09 at 23:25
    
I worked though your helpful example and found the same results as you. I realised my original mistake, instead of editing the contents of the file using "echo blah > testfile" I was using emacs and it seems emacs does change the file ownership. My mistake - and much appreciation for your answer. –  Tom Mar 19 '09 at 8:14
    
You did say "using your favourite text editor"! :-) - Perhaps Emacs shouldn't be my favourite! lol. –  Tom Mar 19 '09 at 8:26
add comment

You have to delete the file to overwrite it. Wether you are able to do that depends on the directory's permissions and ownership. Hijacking ownership of an already existing file is not possible. The write permission you have is only applied on the contents of the file.

share|improve this answer
add comment

It seems you can configure how Emacs deals with this through the backup-by-copying-when-mismatch variable (see the Emacs Manual or type C-h-v backup-by-copying-when-mismatch in Emacs).

I actually filed a bug report about this, because I thought it was a bug in Tramp.

share|improve this answer
    
I think this answer would make more sense as a comment of the answer you are refering to? i.e. #661410 –  Tom Nov 3 '10 at 13:16
add comment

I had misunderstood the way files work, modifying file contents do not change ownership or group.

Why the confusion? EMACS - Whenever I was editing a file I was using Emacs and Emacs does change the owner and group to the current user. It does this because it makes a backup file at save time by moving the "filename" to "filename~" and creating a new file called "filename" - because it's a new file, it has the current users file permissions. I guess this is 1up to VI fans?

share|improve this answer
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.