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I've got a HUUUGE HTML file here saved on my system, which contains data from a product catalogue. The data is structured such that for each product record the name is between two tags (name) and (/name) .

Each product has up to 3 attributes: name, productID, and color, but not all products will have all these attributes.

How would I go about extracting this data for each product without mixing up the product attributes? The file is also 50 megabyte!

Really guys, thanks for any advice you can give. I'm completely out of my depth here! I'll buy a virtual beer for the person with the best answer :)

Code example ....

<name>'hat'</name>
blah blah blah
<prodId>'1829493'</prodId>
blah blah blah
<color>'cyan'</color>

blah blah 
blah blah blah
blah blah blah

<name>'shirt'</name>
blah blah blahblah blah blah
<prodId>'193'</prodId>

<name>'dress'</name>
blah blah blah
blah blah blah
<prodId>'18'</prodId>
<color>'dark purple'</color>
share|improve this question
    
Post some code. If the input data is sufficiently well-formed, perhaps there's a simple answer. –  Kerrek SB Jul 5 '11 at 12:00
1  
Looks like reading an xml document. You can try to slightly alter the function provided as an example in the xmlread help page (mathworks.com/help/techdoc/ref/xmlread.html). –  Aabaz Jul 5 '11 at 12:54
    
@Kerrek SB I've added an example 'nugget' of code. –  Bob M. Jul 5 '11 at 13:40
    
@Bob: Hmm, in this restricted case, and if you promise that the format is exactly as in the example, you could probably get away with a regular expression to extract the three fields. Something like sed or awk should let you write a single command to transform the data into whatever format you require. –  Kerrek SB Jul 5 '11 at 13:57
1  
Are the name/prodId/color tags contained inside another element, <item>, say? –  Richie Cotton Jul 5 '11 at 16:26

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

A file of size 50 MB isn't so big that you can't just load its contents directly into MATLAB as a string, which you can do with the function FILEREAD:

strContents = fileread('yourfile.html');

Assuming the file format you have above, you can then parse the contents with the function REGEXP (using named token capture):

expr = '<(?<tag>name|prodId|color)>''([^<>]+)''</\k<tag>>';
tokens = regexp(strContents,expr,'tokens');
tokens = vertcat(tokens{:});

And the contents of token using your sample file contents will be:

tokens = 

    'name'      'hat'        
    'prodId'    '1829493'    
    'color'     'cyan'       
    'name'      'shirt'      
    'prodId'    '193'        
    'name'      'dress'      
    'prodId'    '18'         
    'color'     'dark purple'

You may then want to parse the resulting N-by-2 cell array and place the contents in a structure array with fields 'name', 'prodId', and 'color'. The difficulty is that not every entry will have all three fields. Assuming each 'name' will be followed by either a 'prodId', a 'color', or both (in the order 'prodId' then 'color'), then the following code should work for you:

s = struct('name',[],'prodId',[],'color',[]);  %# Initialize structure
nTokens = size(tokens,1);                      %# Get number of tokens
nameIndex = find(strcmp(tokens(:,1),'name'));  %# Find indices of 'name'
[s(1:numel(nameIndex)).name] = deal(tokens{nameIndex,2});  %# Fill 'name' field

%# Find and fill 'prodId' that follows a 'name':
index = strcmp(tokens(min(nameIndex+1,nTokens),1),'prodId');
[s(index).prodId] = deal(tokens{nameIndex(index)+1,2});

%# Find and fill 'color' that follows a 'name':
index = strcmp(tokens(min(nameIndex+1,nTokens),1),'color');
[s(index).color] = deal(tokens{nameIndex(index)+1,2});

%# Find and fill 'color' that follows a 'prodId':
index = strcmp(tokens(min(nameIndex+2,nTokens),1),'color');
[s(index).color] = deal(tokens{min(nameIndex(index)+2,nTokens),2});

And the contents of s using your sample file contents will be:

>> s(1)

      name: 'hat'
    prodId: '1829493'
     color: 'cyan'

>> s(2)

      name: 'shirt'
    prodId: '193'
     color: []

>> s(3)

      name: 'dress'
    prodId: '18'
     color: 'dark purple'
share|improve this answer
    
+1 nice use of regexps, although it reminds me of this: codinghorror.com/blog/2009/11/parsing-html-the-cthulhu-way.html –  Amro Jul 5 '11 at 17:02
    
@Amro: What can I say, I like to live dangerously. ;) –  gnovice Jul 5 '11 at 17:09
    
That's a fantastic solution - exactly what I was after. However, my example of "tags" are an abstraction of the truth. Would it be possible for the code to be more flexible what the tag pairs are. Could the pair of tags, be two strings? With the pair's of tags stored in an structure? In the above code, we assume the second of the tag pair is the previous with a '/' in it. Rather than <name> & </name>, it might be <name> and <endofname> –  Bob M. Jul 5 '11 at 18:00
    
@Bob M.: That is easy enough to account for. If the format is <XXX> and <endofXXX>, just make the last part of the match expression <endof\k<tag>>. If you could have either </XXX> or <endofXXX> as the second tag, then use this for the last part of the match expression: <(?:/|endof)\k<tag>> –  gnovice Jul 5 '11 at 18:12
    
@gnovice : Thanks again. What I'm getting at is what about if the first tag is <name> and the other is <randomlookingtag> ? ... My tags aren't as 'nicely' defined as I would like in some cases. –  Bob M. Jul 5 '11 at 18:17

There are two ways of solving this sort of problem: string manipulation with regexes (as suggested by gnovice) or parsing the file (or a mix of the two). Parsing is often best if your file is very well structured; regexes win for messy files.

Here's the parsing solution.

Start by downloading xmliotools, and calling xml_read on your file. Your example isn't completely reproducible, so here are two different versions of the data.

Save this to test1.xml:

<?xml version="1.0" encoding="utf-8"?>
<root>
<name>'hat'</name>
<prodId>'1829493'</prodId>
<color>'cyan'</color>
<name>'dress'</name>
<prodId>'18'</prodId>
<color>'dark purple'</color>
</root>

Save this to test2.xml.

<?xml version="1.0" encoding="utf-8"?>
<root>
<item>
<name>'hat'</name>
<prodId>'1829493'</prodId>
<color>'cyan'</color>
</item>
<item>
<name>'dress'</name>
<prodId>'18'</prodId>
<color>'dark purple'</color>
</item>
</root>

Now compare

x1 = xml_read('test1.xml')
x2 = xml_read('test2.xml')
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks Richie, I'm going to try both methods, and see how the speed compares. –  Bob M. Jul 5 '11 at 18:01

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