Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I'm trying to improve the performance of our application. We have a lot of Activator.CreateInstance calls that are causing some grief.

We instantiate a lot of classes based on an interface (ITabDocument) and after looking around I thought of using this code:

The code is no better (infact marginally slower) than using the Activator.CreateInstance code we had.

    public static Func<T> CreateInstance<T>(Type objType) where T : class, new()
    {
        var dynMethod = new DynamicMethod("DM$OBJ_FACTORY_" + objType.Name, objType, null, objType);
        ILGenerator ilGen = dynMethod.GetILGenerator();
        ilGen.Emit(OpCodes.Newobj, objType.GetConstructor(Type.EmptyTypes));
        ilGen.Emit(OpCodes.Ret);
        return (Func<T>)dynMethod.CreateDelegate(typeof(Func<T>));
    }

I'm wondering why this is, all I'm doing is:

ITabDocument document = CreateInstance<ITabDocument>(Type.GetType("[Company].Something"));

Is there a better way of creating objects which would assist with the above? Its a little hard when you're not sure of the concrete type.

share|improve this question
5  
How often are you calling CreateInstance - because the whole point of that is that you'd call CreateInstance once but then remember the factory delegate. If you're calling CreateInstance on each operation, then yes, it'll be slower... –  Jon Skeet Jul 5 '11 at 12:00
2  
Some design patterns may help you, like factory method, abstract factory and similar creational patterns. They allow you to late bind your objects. You could look here: oodesign.com –  Nickolodeon Jul 5 '11 at 12:03
    
@Jon Skeet Thanks for replying, I'm calling it at least 20-30 times as we need to create that many tabbed documents at start and they're all different implementations of ITabbedDocument. –  Tiffany Townsend Jul 5 '11 at 12:25
    
@Tiffany: But are they all different types? That's the important thing - you should only call that method once per type. –  Jon Skeet Jul 5 '11 at 12:27
    
Oops, yes they are all different types. I've edited my example –  Tiffany Townsend Jul 5 '11 at 12:41

5 Answers 5

I did some benchmarking between these (I would write down the bare minimum details):

public static T Instance() //~1800 ms
{
    return new T();
}

public static T Instance() //~1800 ms
{
    return new Activator.CreateInstance<T>();
}

public static readonly Func<T> Instance = () => new T(); //~1800 ms

public static readonly Func<T> Instance = () => 
                                 Activator.CreateInstance<T>(); //~1800 ms

//works for types with no default constructor as well
public static readonly Func<T> Instance = () => 
               (T)FormatterServices.GetUninitializedObject(typeof(T)); //~2000 ms


public static readonly Func<T> Instance = 
     Expression.Lambda<Func<T>>(Expression.New(typeof(T))).Compile();  
     //~50 ms for classes and ~100 ms for structs

As CD says compiled expression is the fastest, and by a big margin. All the methods except (T)FormatterServices.GetUninitializedObject(typeof(T)) work only for types with default constructor.

And caching the compiled resultant delegate is trivial when you have a static class per generic type. Like:

public static class New<T> where T : new()
{
    public static readonly Func<T> Instance = Expression.Lambda<Func<T>>
                                              (
                                               Expression.New(typeof(T))
                                              ).Compile();
}

Note the new constraint. Call anything

MyType me = New<MyType>.Instance();

Except for the first time the class is being loaded in memory, the execution is going to be fastest.

To have a class that handles both types with default constructor and without, I took a hybrid approach, from here:

public static class New<T>
{
    public static readonly Func<T> Instance = Creator();

    static Func<T> Creator()
    {
        Type t = typeof(T);
        if (t == typeof(string))
            return Expression.Lambda<Func<T>>(Expression.Constant(string.Empty)).Compile();

        if (t.HasDefaultConstructor())
            return Expression.Lambda<Func<T>>(Expression.New(t)).Compile();

        return () => (T)FormatterServices.GetUninitializedObject(t);
    }
}

public static bool HasDefaultConstructor(this Type t)
{
    return t.IsValueType || t.GetConstructor(Type.EmptyTypes) != null;
}

Will handle value types too in an efficient manner.

Note that (T)FormatterServices.GetUninitializedObject(t) will fail for string. Hence special handling for string is in place to return empty string.

share|improve this answer
    
And how would this apply to creating an object whose type is only known at runtime as per the question? The question's use of generics is only for casting the returned object to a base class. In the example you have provided, the type of the instance returned is the same as the generic parameter and thus a normal constructor could be used (excepting the fact that it can also create an uninitialized object). –  Richard Collette Jun 13 '13 at 16:35
    
@RichardCollette I agree its not directly answering the question but shows a way to have nice little helper class (the class is incomplete, hopefully I will update it a day). Nonetheless, it isn't too difficult to fine tune that to workable solution for OP (just use provided type instead of typeof(T)). –  nawfal Jun 13 '13 at 18:30

This might help: Don’t use Activator.CreateInstance or ConstructorInfo.Invoke, use compiled lambda expressions

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks, I saw this earlier but wasn't sure whether I can call it adhoc like I'd need. –  Tiffany Townsend Jul 5 '11 at 12:27
    
Thanks for the link, it leads onto this blog rogeralsing.com/2008/02/28/linq-expressions-creating-objects which I've been reading and I think it may now be one of the best blogs I've ever seen. Thank you so much –  RichK Jul 5 '11 at 15:18

The problem is if your are going to call CreateInstance over and over again directly rather than saving the result somewhere and using that result over and over again, you should probably just go ahead and do you caching inside of it.

internal static class DelegateStore<T>{
     internal static IDictionnary<string, Func<T>> Store =new ConcurrentDictionary<string,Func<T>>();
}

public static T CreateInstance<T>(Type objType) where T : class
{
    Func<T> returnFunc;
    if(!DelegateStore<T>.Store.TryGetValue(objType.FullName, out returnFunc)){
        var dynMethod = new DynamicMethod("DM$OBJ_FACTORY_" + objType.Name, objType, null, objType);
        ILGenerator ilGen = dynMethod.GetILGenerator();
        ilGen.Emit(OpCodes.Newobj, objType.GetConstructor(Type.EmptyTypes));
        ilGen.Emit(OpCodes.Ret);
        returnFunc =(Func<T>)dynMethod.CreateDelegate(typeof(Func<T>));
        DelegateStore<T>.Store[objType.FullName]=returnfunc;
    }
    return returnFunc();
}
share|improve this answer

You're probably getting some overhead from the generation of the same code.

The ILGenerator dynamically creates code for the factory.

Create somekind of map or Dictionary of types you've already used, and keep the factory method created for that type.

share|improve this answer

Generic method for constructing delegates, calling constructor directly. Automatically searches constructor in given type with signature of given delegate type and constructs delegate of that type. Code here:

/// <summary>
/// Reflective object construction helper.
/// All methods are thread safe.
/// </summary>
public static class Constructor
{
    /// <summary>
    /// Searches an instanceType constructor with delegateType-matching signature and constructs delegate of delegateType creating new instance of instanceType.
    /// Instance is casted to delegateTypes's return type. 
    /// Delegate's return type must be assignable from instanceType.
    /// </summary>
    /// <param name="delegateType">Type of delegate, with constructor-corresponding signature to be constructed.</param>
    /// <param name="instanceType">Type of instance to be constructed.</param>
    /// <returns>Delegate of delegateType wich constructs instance of instanceType by calling corresponding instanceType constructor.</returns>
    public static Delegate Compile(Type delegateType,Type instanceType)
    {
        if (!typeof(Delegate).IsAssignableFrom(delegateType))
        {
            throw new ArgumentException(String.Format("{0} is not a Delegate type.",delegateType.FullName),"delegateType");
        }
        var invoke = delegateType.GetMethod("Invoke");
        var parameterTypes = invoke.GetParameters().Select(pi => pi.ParameterType).ToArray();
        var resultType = invoke.ReturnType;
        if(!resultType.IsAssignableFrom(instanceType))
        {
            throw new ArgumentException(String.Format("Delegate's return type ({0}) is not assignable from {1}.",resultType.FullName,instanceType.FullName));
        }
        var ctor = instanceType.GetConstructor(
            BindingFlags.Instance | BindingFlags.Public | BindingFlags.NonPublic, null, parameterTypes, null);
        if(ctor == null)
        {
            throw new ArgumentException("Can't find constructor with delegate's signature","instanceType");
        }
        var parapeters = parameterTypes.Select(Expression.Parameter).ToArray();

        var newExpression = Expression.Lambda(delegateType,
            Expression.Convert(Expression.New(ctor, parapeters), resultType),
            parapeters);
        var @delegate = newExpression.Compile();
        return @delegate;
    }
    public static TDelegate Compile<TDelegate>(Type instanceType)
    {
        return (TDelegate) (object) Compile(typeof (TDelegate), instanceType);
    }
}

is part of Yappi project's sources. Using it you can construct delegate calling any constructor of given type, including constructor with parameters (except ref and out parameters).

Sample usage:

var newList = Constructor.Compile<Func<int, IList<String>>>(typeof (List<String>));
var list = newList(100);

After construction of delegate, store it somewhere in static dictionary or in static field of class with generic parameter. Don't construct new delegate each time. Use one delegate for constructing multiple instances of given type.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.