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Regardless of whether or not this is a good idea, is it possible to implement an interface where the executing function is aware of the calling object's type?

class A
{
   private C;

   public int doC(int input)
   {
      return C.DoSomething(input);
   }
}

class B
{
   private C;

   public int doC(int input)
   {
      return C.DoSomething(input);
   }
}

class C
{
   public int DoSomething(int input)
   {
      if(GetType(CallingObject) == A)
      {
         return input + 1;
      }
      else if(GetType(CallingObject) == B)
      {
         return input + 2;
      } 
      else
      {
         return input + 3;
      }
   }
}

It seems to me like this is a bad coding practice (because the parameters don't change, but the output would) but aside from that is it possible?

I'm in a situation were I want a few specific types to be able to call a certain function, but I can't exclude access to the function. I thought about having a "type" parameter

DoSomething(int input, Type callingobject)

But there's no guarantee that the calling object would use GetType(this), as opposed to GetType(B) to spoof a B regardless of their own type.

Would this be as simple (relatively simple) as examining the callstack?


EDIT

Please vote up JaredPar's answer (if you want) as well as John Feminella's. I could not mark both answers as accepted, and I accepted John Feminella's answer because it is specifically what I asked for, as opposed to Jared's answer which brought up a solution which I had not previously considered.

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Could you give a little more background? Cause now I don't see why you don't just implement seperate methods in C. Something like C.DoSometingA and C.DoSomethingB. Or even better: but the behaviour in the A & B classes. –  Boris Callens Mar 18 '09 at 13:44
1  
The short version is that I would end up have 30 or 40 identical functions that were simply off by one or two lines. –  DevinB Mar 18 '09 at 13:55
    
@devinb: See the edit I made to my post below. You may want to consider opening a different question. –  John Feminella Mar 18 '09 at 14:01
1  
I think you're right, however, the deluge of (very good natured and professional) abuse that was rained upon my idea means that the re-design I anticipated will be much more significant than I thought. As such, I can't succinctly create a better question yet. –  DevinB Mar 18 '09 at 14:16
    
@devinb: Well, I hope we weren't too harsh! :) But once you get it formulated, do follow up -- I'd be interested to hear the specifics. –  John Feminella Mar 18 '09 at 14:22
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11 Answers

up vote 16 down vote accepted

First, yes, it's a terrible idea to do this and breaks all kinds of solid design principles. You should definitely consider an alternative approach if that's open, like simply using polymorphism -- this seems like it can be refactored to a pretty clear case of single dispatch.

Secondly, yes, it's possible. Use System.Diagnostics.StackTrace to walk the stack; then get the appropriate StackFrame one level up. Then determine which method was the caller by using GetMethod() on that StackFrame. Note that building a stack trace is a potentially expensive operation, and it's possible for callers of your method to obscure where things are really coming from.


Edit: This comment from the OP makes it pretty clear that this could probably be a generic or polymorphic method. @devinb, you might want to consider making a new question that provides more detail about what you're trying to do, and we can see if it lends itself well to a good solution.

The short version is that I would end up have 30 or 40 identical functions that were simply off by one or two lines. – devinb (12 secs ago)

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D'oh! Deleting my "duplicate answer" . . . dumb stupid slow fingers . . . +1 BTW –  Binary Worrier Mar 18 '09 at 13:36
1  
No sweat -- I get ninja'd all the time by that dratted Jon Skeet. BTW, I wouldn't delete your post unless it's pretty close to an exact duplicate. If you make a point that's mostly similar to mine but different in some way, definitely keep that around. –  John Feminella Mar 18 '09 at 13:55
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There is (almost) always a proper design that can accomplish what you need. If you take one step back to describe what you actually need to do, I am confident you'll get at least one good design that doesn't require you to have to resort to something like this.

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My design is a very tightly coupled and self-referencing nightmare, so yes, I've come up with designs that would not have this particular ugliness, but they have ugliness of their own. I'm just trying to explore each option. –  DevinB Mar 18 '09 at 13:37
    
@devinb i find it highly unlikely that the other options are as ugly as this –  Rex M Mar 18 '09 at 13:42
    
They're more complicated. As opposed to this one which is relatively simple, but horrible. =D I was mostly just curious. –  DevinB Mar 18 '09 at 14:03
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As an alternative approach, have you ever considered offering up a different class based on the type of the object that is asking for the class. Say the following

public interface IC {
  int DoSomething();
}

public static CFactory { 
  public IC GetC(Type requestingType) { 
    if ( requestingType == typeof(BadType1) ) { 
      return new CForBadType1();
    } else if ( requestingType == typeof(OtherType) { 
      return new CForOtherType();
    }  
    ...
  }
}

This would be a much cleaner approach than have each method change it's behavior based on the calling object. It would cleanly separate out the concerns to the different implementations of IC. Additionally, they could all proxy back to the real C implementation.

EDIT Examining the callstack

As several other people pointed out you can examine the callstack to determine what object is immediately calling the function. However this is not a foolproof way to determine if one of the objects you want to special case is calling you. For instance I could do the following to call you from SomeBadObject but make it very difficult for you to determine that I did so.

public class SomeBadObject {
  public void CallCIndirectly(C obj) { 
    var ret = Helper.CallDoSomething(c);
  }
}

public static class Helper {
  public int CallDoSomething(C obj) {
    return obj.DoSomething();
  }
}

You could of course walk further back on the call stack. But that's even more fragile because it may be a completely legal path for SomeBadObject to be on the stack when a different object calls DoSomething.

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Would this still require A and B to provide their type to the CFactory? How would I prevent spoofing? –  DevinB Mar 18 '09 at 13:39
    
@devinb, you can walk the stack to prevent spoofing but it's not a foolproof way. .Net just wasn't designed for a function to know it's caller and as a result any attempt to get it to work will have holes. –  JaredPar Mar 18 '09 at 13:50
    
I'm trying to code with the paradigm that a malicious coder will have access to my source, but not be able to change it. But I think you're right in that it's nearly impossible to exclude all "badObject" possibilities –  DevinB Mar 18 '09 at 14:02
    
A malicious coder will be able to emulate the logic of the "good path" and use reflection to get at all of your private methods and data, so there is not much sense in trying to use a foolproof method to determine the type of the caller. –  Yaur Jul 8 '11 at 7:13
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Well you could try grabbing the stack trace and determine the type of the caller from there, which is an overkill in my opinion and would be slow.

How about an interface, that A,B would implement?

interface IFoo { 
     int Value { get; } 
}

And then your DoSomething method would look like this:

   public int DoSomething(int input, IFoo foo)
   {
        return input + foo.Value;
   }
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You could use the System.Diagnostics.StackTrace class to create a stack trace. Then you could look for the StackFrame that is associated with the caller. The StackFrame has a Method property that you can use to get to the type of the caller.

However, the above method is nothing that should be used in performance critical code.

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You could examine the call stack, but that is both expensive and fragile. When your code is jit'ed the compiler might inline your methods so while it could work in debug mode you could get a different stack when compiled in release mode.

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The easiest answer would be to pass in the sender object like any event with the typical sender, eventargs methodology.

Your calling code would look like this:

return c.DoSomething(input, this);

Your DoSomething method would simply check the type using the IS operator:

public static int DoSomething(int input, object source)
{
    if(source is A)
        return input + 1;
    else if(source is B)
        return input + 2;
    else
        throw new ApplicationException();

}

This seems like something with a little more OOP. You might consider C an abstract class with an method, and having A,B inherit from C and simply call the method. This would allow you to check the type of the base object, which is not obviously spoofed.

Out of curiosity, what are you trying with this construct?

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Roughly speaking, C contains information for A, and information for B, and the method to access that information is identical, but B can't access (or be ABLE to access) A information, and B can't access A information.... roughly. –  DevinB Mar 18 '09 at 13:46
1  
Wow, that confused me even more :P Can you make it a real world example? Like a .. cats & dogs example or something? –  Boris Callens Mar 18 '09 at 13:47
1  
Hmm... maybe. A database contains a list of American Spies, and Russian Spies. The method returns a list. When the Americans ask, they get the American list, when the Russians ask, they get the Russian list. –  DevinB Mar 18 '09 at 13:53
    
And I want to make sure that they can't get each others lists. =P –  DevinB Mar 18 '09 at 13:54
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structure it like a event handler, I'm sure FX cop would even suggest you do this

static void Console_CancelKeyPress(object sender, ConsoleCancelEventArgs e)
        {
            throw new NotImplementedException();
        }
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... I don't understand. –  DevinB Mar 18 '09 at 17:46
    
I'm saying use what Matt Murrell suggested, but at least use the same convention as events are laid out. i.e pass your calling object, then your even args –  dfasdljkhfaskldjhfasklhf Mar 19 '09 at 13:42
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Not reliably due to the possibility of inlining by the runtime.

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Assume these functions are too huge to inline. –  DevinB Mar 18 '09 at 19:01
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I might be in trouble thinking I would handle this differently but....

I assume this:

class A calls on class E for information
class C calls on class E for information
both through the same method in E

You know and created all three classes and can hide the content of class E to the public. If this were not the case, your controll would always be lost.

Logically: if you can hide content of class E, you do this most likely by distributing through a DLL.

If you do this anyway, why not hide the content of classes A and C as well (same method) but allowing A and C to be used as base for derived classes B and D.

In classes A and C you would have a method to call the method in class E and deliver the result. In that method (usable by the derived class, but the content is hidden to the users) you can have long strings as "keys" passed to the method in class E. These strings could not be guessed by any user and would only be known to the base classes A, C and E.

Having the base classes encapsulate the knowledge of how to call the method in E correctly would be perfect OOP implementation I think

Then again... I could be overlooking the complexities here.

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Starting with Visual Studio 2012 (.NET Framework 4.5) you can automatically pass caller information to a method by using caller attributes (VB and C#).

public void TheCaller()
{
    SomeMethod();
}

public void SomeMethod([CallerMemberName] string memberName = "")
{
    Console.WriteLine(memberName); // ==> "TheCaller"
}

The caller attributes are in the System.Runtime.CompilerServices namespace.


This is ideal for the implementation of INotifyPropertyChanged:

private void OnPropertyChanged([CallerMemberName]string caller = null) {
     var handler = PropertyChanged;
     if (handler != null) {
        handler(this, new PropertyChangedEventArgs(caller));
     }
}

Example:

private string _name;
public string Name
{
    get { return _name; }
    set
    {
        if (value != _name) {
            _name = value;
            OnPropertyChanged(); // Call without the optional parameter!
        }
    }
}
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+1 for pointing this out, because the purpose for adding caller info attributes in 4.5 is a great example of a context where this is in fact needed, even thought it may at first glance appear to violate good design principles. Specifically, when writing tracing, debugging, or diagnostic tools. –  BitMask777 Nov 21 '12 at 19:22
1  
@BitMask777: Yes, another example where it makes sense is when implementing INotifyPropertyChanged. –  Olivier Jacot-Descombes Nov 22 '12 at 13:46
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