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I apologize for the confusing title. What I'm wondering is this: I have a SELECT query that, within its WHERE conditions performs a multiple-column IN comparison against a result set returned by a subquery. What I want compared against the results of that subquery are two possible sets of values which each include one value from the parent SELECT query and a few constants.

In other words, how can I make something like this work:

SELECT ... WHERE ((id, 1, 2, 3), (id, 4, 5, 6)) IN (SELECT a, b, c, d FROM atable)

In this case, 'id' is provided by the parent SELECT statement, but the other values are constants. The intention is to compare those two sets of values against the many sets of different values (a, b, c, and d) in 'atable'.

I know I can make this work by adding an OR and repeating the IN comparison to compare the two possible sets against the subquery results individually, but I don't want to do that for efficiency's sake (since it would repeat the subquery).

I apologize if this request wasn't worded very elegantly, but I hope the meaning comes across. I've tried searching Google and reading through the MySQL documentation to no avail (possibly because I don't know how to word the problem well).

Thanks in advance for your time and help.

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4 Answers 4

That still feels reasonably slow. Won't it make more sense to just use a join?

select query.* from query 
inner join atable on (atable.a=query.id) and ((b=1 and c=2 and d=3) or (b=4 and c=5 and d=6)

That is still readible and very fast. Note the extra conditions on the join.

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+1 : Doh, yeah, hmmm, makes my efforts look moronic :) –  MatBailie Jul 5 '11 at 12:58
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Depending on your real world situation, does the following re-factor fit your needs?

SELECT
  *
FROM
  query
WHERE
  EXISTS (
    SELECT
      *
    FROM
      atable
    WHERE
      a = query.id
      AND (
           (b = 1 AND c = 2 AND d = 3)
           OR
           (b = 4 AND c = 5 AND d = 6)
          )
  )


Or possibly...

SELECT
  *
FROM
  query
INNER JOIN
(
  SELECT atable.a FROM atable
  WHERE (b = 1 AND c = 2 AND d = 3) OR (b = 4 AND c = 5 AND d = 6)
  GROUP BY atable.a
)
  AS filter
    ON filter.a = query.id


An in a generalised sense...

SELECT
  *
FROM
  query
INNER JOIN
(
  SELECT
    atable.a
  FROM
    atable
  INNER JOIN
  (
    SELECT 1 AS b, 2 AS c, 3 AS d
    UNION ALL
    SELECT 4 AS b, 5 AS c, 6 AS d
  )
    AS patterns
      ON  patterns.b = atable.b
      AND patterns.c = atable.c
      AND patterns.d = atable.d
  GROUP BY
    atable.a
)
  AS filter
    ON filter.a = query.id
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YOu could also UNION several different queries together. Sometimes a UNION of two simpler queries will be better optimized by the optimizer than a single more complicated query. Not that it should be that way, but it often is.

P.S. I'd appreciate knowing the reasons for the downvote. Concern above was for performance ("feels slow"). Feels?

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1  
The UNION would require temporary tables. UNION ALL will be a bit faster, but keeps (potential) duplicates. Sorting the results from the UNION is a very expensive operation. –  Eljakim Jul 5 '11 at 14:23
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SELECT ... 
WHERE EXISTS
  ( SELECT *
    FROM 
      ( SELECT a, b, c, d FROM atable
      ) AS tmp
    WHERE (id, 1, 2, 3) = (a, b, c, d)
       OR (id, 4, 5, 6) = (a, b, c, d)
  )

or the JOIN that Eljakim suggests, slightly altered. You'll probably need a GROUP BY to remove duplicate results:

SELECT ... 
  JOIN
      ( SELECT a, b, c, d FROM atable
      ) AS tmp
    ON (id, 1, 2, 3) = (a, b, c, d)
    OR (id, 4, 5, 6) = (a, b, c, d)
GROUP BY id
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