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what about nine-patch images.
Can they be used instead of the ?

  • /res/drawable-hdpi/icon.png ….. 72×72

  • /res/drawable-mdpi/icon.png …. 48×48

  • /res/drawable-ldpi/icon.png …… 36×36

What are the benefits/drawbacks?

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1 Answer 1

up vote 5 down vote accepted

Technically you don't ever have to provide an image for all three resolutions- if one is missing, the system will replace it with one of the others. Though it's usually better to have all three for maintaining appearance across all screen densities.

9-patch can be used instead, but should be only under specific circumstances. If you have an image for a button that expands but preserves the corners, keep in mind these corners are going to look much smaller on a high resolution screen if you don't provide an hdpi version. But the size of the image itself will still expand according to the specified stretch areas.

So in a nutshell: 9-patch does allow an image to expand as needed independent of resolution, but the non-stretchable parts of the image will not be magically converted to higher/lower resolutions.

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thanks. That was what i was hoping for since my photoshop skills are limited :). –  Erik Jul 5 '11 at 17:41
    
In photoshop i created a png 512x512 and used the draw9patch.bat from sdk-tools. This png looks ok in the launcher app list but in the share menu inside the android gallery app the png has full size. Why can launcher icon scale to fitt and not the share menu? –  Erik Jul 6 '11 at 7:34
    
I'm not sure- I've not heard of using 9-patch as a launcher icon before, and without seeing your code and the image itself I don't know exactly what it is you're doing. That's an awfully large app icon though, don't you think? –  Nathan Fig Jul 6 '11 at 12:19
    
I learning how to do this. Yes it was big :). Im going with the hdpi,mdpi,ldpi approach. Thanks –  Erik Jul 7 '11 at 13:17

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