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I read in tldp.com that

if [ $condition1 ] && [ $condition2 ]

Same as: if [ $condition1 -a $condition2 ]

Returns true if both condition1 and condition2 hold true..."

but when I tried

if [ $a == 2 ] || [ $b == 4 ]
then
echo "a or b is correct"
else
echo "a and b are not correct"
fi

it gives error. I'm using bash.

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4 Answers 4

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Your logic is ok but your comparison operators are incorrect, you should use the '-eq' for comparing integers and '==' for strings. See 'man test' for quick reference, though it's also documented in 'man bash'.

When using integer comparison it is always best to initialise variables to 0 as well otherwise if they remain unset you will get errors.

As mentioned by c00k, use [[ rather than [ if using bash as it is a builtin so bash will not need to shell out to use the /usr/bin/[ command.

i.e.

a=0;b=0
# do something else with a or b
if [[ $a -eq 2 ]] || [[ $b -eq 4 ]]
then
    echo "a or b is correct"
else
    echo "a and b are not correct"
fi
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If you're using Bash, then drop the single [ and use double ones [[.
For arithmetic operations, use ((.

So you'd want to write this:

if (( a == 2 )) || (( b == 4 )); then
    echo "foo"
fi # etc
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Did you assign a value to a and b? If not you have to (otherwise you definitely should) quote your variables with double quotes:

if [ "$a" == "2" ] || [ "$b" == "4" ]; then
  echo "a or b is correct";
else
  echo "a and b are not correct";
fi
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Yes it's working fine now. –  John Jul 5 '11 at 13:28
    
Actually the declaration was there before too. But now it works before it didn't !!! –  John Jul 5 '11 at 13:29
    
Correct me if I'm wrong. && and || are bash comparison operators used within [[ ]] and it doesn't work in [ ]. Whereas -a and -o work within test or [ ] and not inside [[ ]]. –  John Jul 5 '11 at 13:35
    
In bash (see man bash) command1 && command2 means command2 is executed if, and only if, command1 returns an exit status of zero. and command1 || command2 means command2 is executed if and only if command1 returns a non-zero exit status.. [] is a short hand for the test command. -a and -o are arguments to the test command (see man test). –  bmk Jul 5 '11 at 13:51

Correct me if I'm wrong. && and || are bash comparison-------- : :


!/usr/bin/ksh

set -x ###### debug mode on

while : do dt=date '+%M'

if ([ "$dt" -ge "15"] && [ "$dt" -le "17" ]) || ([ "$dt" -ge "25" ] && [ "$dt" -le "27" ])

then

echo "Time-->minutes between 15 to 17 OR 25 to 27"

else

echo "Time--> minutes out of range" fi

sleep 300 ##### sleep for 5 minutes

done

                           ------------- below lines are debug output

+ + date +%M

dt=17

  • [ 17 -ge 15 ]

  • [ 17 -le 17 ]

  • echo Time--> minutes between 15 to 17 OR 25 to 27

Time--> minutes between 15 to 17 OR 25 to 27

  • date

Sat Mar 3 15:17:23 AST 2012

  • sleep 300

+++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

  • :

    • date +%M

dt=22

  • [ 22 -ge 15 ]

  • [ 22 -le 17 ]

  • [ 22 -ge 25 ]

  • echo Time--> minutes out of range

Time--> minutes out of range

  • sleep 300

^C$ ######## breaking out of loop(terminating the execution).

$ $ env |grep -i shell

  • grep -i shell

  • env

SHELL=/bin/ksh

$ set +x ##### ending debug mode.

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post it as a new question. Have a look at stackoverflow.com/faq –  John Mar 3 '12 at 14:23

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