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I just want to ask if Tokenization is the same as Lexical analysis and if Backus Naur Form is the same as Context Free Grammar? I need to define and explain all four and give examples but It seems some websites treat some as one.

Thank you.

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extra question: –  Levi Jul 5 '11 at 14:39
    
extra question: Can I name my tokens anything? like the = sign. Can I call it "equal operator" or "operator equal" or is there a strict token for that that I need to follow? –  Levi Jul 5 '11 at 14:40
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closed as off topic by kapa, Shadow Wizard, Jeff Atwood Jul 6 '11 at 11:05

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1 Answer

Tokenization and lexical analysis are synonyms. Backus-Naur form is a language or notation for describing context-free grammars; thus, it is not correct to say that Backus-Naur form is a context-free grammar.

Edit: Corrected my statement after @Gunther's comment below.

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BNF is for context-free grammars. There is a single nonterminal on the left hand side of each production. You need to lift this restriction for expressing context-sensitive grammars, and you won't call that BNF. –  Gunther Jul 5 '11 at 13:44
    
@Gunther: I actually wasn't aware of that restriction; thanks! –  Aasmund Eldhuset Jul 5 '11 at 13:57
    
extra question: Can I name my tokens anything? like the = sign. Can I call it "equal operator" or "operator equal" or is there a strict token for that that I need to follow? –  Levi Jul 5 '11 at 14:41
    
@Levi: You choose all token names yourself; however, you must define what each of them means: <equal_operator> ::= "=". –  Aasmund Eldhuset Jul 5 '11 at 14:46
    
ok thanks a lot! –  Levi Jul 5 '11 at 14:56
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