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what can I do if JSLint complains about "i" being an unused variable in such a scenario:

var items = "<option selected></option>";
$.each(data, function (i, item) {
    items += "<option value='" + item.Value + "'>" + item.Text + "</option>";
});

(i, item) is the required order of parameters and I'm only using "item".

Is there any other solution than tolerating unused variables or rewriting the $.each to use the index, both solutions which I would prefer not to do?

Thanks in advance.

Update: I appreciate all the suggestions but this code is simply an example to show you what I mean and I'm interested to see a general solution, if there's any. Thanks.

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3  
In this particular case this = item (api.jquery.com/jQuery.each), so you wouldn't have to use either parameter. But this question should probably be answered in a more general sense. –  Greg Jul 5 '11 at 13:48
    
It would be so nice if we could just do $.each(data, function (, item) –  oscaralexander Feb 4 '14 at 14:14
    
Many people use _ for an unused parameter, but I see no way to tell JSLint to specifically ignore _, although that would be really nice. –  David James Sep 10 '14 at 2:19

5 Answers 5

up vote 53 down vote accepted

Try:

var items = "<option selected></option>";
/*jslint unparam: true*/
$.each(data, function (i, item) {
    items += "<option value='" + item.Value + "'>" + item.Text + "</option>";
});
/*jslint unparam: false*/  // so that you still get warnings from other functions
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+1. This worked great for me in a similar situation, and I was able to put it just before and just after the affected line. Thanks! –  Ed Bayiates May 10 '12 at 0:13
2  
Since you're not using i and you're iterating through an array of objects using jQuery's iterator, you can use "this": $.each([{a:0},{a:1},{a:2},{a:3}], function(){ console.log(this.a)}) –  Szabolcs Kurdi Jun 4 '13 at 11:17
    
This is just one example though. –  nickf Jun 8 '13 at 22:20
1  
This is the best way to do it! /*jslint unparam: true*/ –  Foxinni Dec 3 '13 at 8:32
    
How would one disable warnings about unused functions? –  Joel DeWitt Jan 15 at 14:14

you could do this:

var items = "<option selected></option>";
$.each(data, function () {
    var item = arguments[1];
    items += "<option value='" + item.Value + "'>" + item.Text + "</option>";
});

...but that's probably worse if you ask me.

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6  
definately worse....... –  Schroedingers Cat Jul 5 '11 at 13:50
1  
@Schroedinger -- oh yeah, for sure. It's always a trade-off with JSLint. You just have to decide for yourself. –  nickf Jul 5 '11 at 13:54
7  
Fixes one warning, causes another "JS Lint: Use a named parameter" :) –  Jason Kostempski Oct 26 '12 at 18:59

A possible way to get rid of the warning in a way that is fairly self-documenting is to cause the unused variable to get used, like this:

// Utility function in project scope:
function unusedVariables(/* Put all your deliberately unused variables here */) {
    // pass
}

// And then, later:
var items = "<option selected></option>";
$.each(data, function (i, item) {
    unusedVariables(i); //< This is the new and magical line
    items += "<option value='" + item.Value + "'>" + item.Text + "</option>";
});

Of course, now you can get into the situation where you mark a variable as unused, and you still use it somewhere. Also, this method might be too verbose, depending on the context.

This method has the advantage that it is precise. Using /*jslint unparam*/ might be too broad.

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2  
This may fail JSLint's "empty block" test. –  jokeyrhyme Aug 4 '13 at 4:52
32  
I assume the goal of JSLint is to have a cleaner code. –  Julien Deflaux Aug 28 '13 at 15:01
4  
This answer does 'work', though I would recommend against using it. I file it under "the solution is worse than the problem." –  David James Dec 7 '13 at 21:51
    
It'd be more helpful for other readers if you guys added some details about what is bad about this solution, @superluminary and DavidJames. I don't have a problem with people disliking this solution, but adding a comment saying just that isn't helping anybody. :) –  Magnus Hoff Mar 3 '14 at 21:24
3  
Apologies Magnus, comment deleted. The reason I dislike this solution is because you're adding non-semantic code merely for the purpose of fooling a specific version of a specific validator into passing your code. It's a hack, it doesn't add meaning to the code, and it won't age well. The proper solution is to modify JSLint. –  superluminary Mar 3 '14 at 21:58

How about using void to make explicit that you are intentionally not using the variable?

$.each(data, function (i, item, any, other, unused, vars) {
  void(i, any, other, unused, vars);
  items += "<option value='" + item.Value + "'>" + item.Text + "</option>";
});

This is also useful in abstract functions that are expected to be overwritten, but where you want to show the signature, or in mocks, where you are ignoring arguments, but want to match the mocked function's signature.

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3  
using void does not seem to pass JSLint –  xorcus Dec 8 '13 at 21:04
    
Using void causes Expected 'undefined' and instead saw 'void'. Using undefined(i, any, other, unused, vars); passes JSLint though. –  msenni Sep 10 '14 at 6:20

I rename "i" as "unused". It still leaves the error obviously, but I see it in the list and know I've "checked" that error and am okay with it.

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