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Here's a routine to do an HTTP request using WinINet and either return the fetched string or raise an exception:

function Request(const pConnection: HINTERNET; const localpath: string): string;
var Buffer: packed Array[1..5000] of Char; BytesRead: Cardinal; pRequest: HINTERNET;     sent: boolean;
begin
Result := '';
pRequest := HTTPOpenRequest(pConnection, 'GET', pchar(localpath), nil, nil, nil, 0, 0);
if pRequest <> nil then
  begin
  sent := HTTPSendRequest(pRequest, nil, 0, nil, 0);
  if sent then
    while InternetReadFile(pRequest, @Buffer, SizeOf(Buffer)-1 {leave room for terminator}, BytesRead) do
      begin
      Buffer[BytesRead+1] := #0;
      Result := Result + buffer;
      end;
  InternetCloseHandle(pRequest);
  if not sent then RaiseLastOSerror; // HTTPSendRequest failed
  end
else RaiseLastOSerror; // HTTPOpenRequest failed
end;

If InternetCloseHandle(pRequest) can fail even though pRequest was successfully assigned, GetLastError() will return an error code for InternetCloseHandle() instead of HTTPSendRequest(). Fixing that would require code like:

function Request(const pConnection: HINTERNET; const localpath: string): string;
var Buffer: packed Array[1..5000] of Char; BytesRead: Cardinal; pRequest: HINTERNET;
begin
Result := '';
pRequest := HTTPOpenRequest(pConnection, 'GET', pchar(localpath), nil, nil, nil, 0, 0);
if pRequest <> nil then
  begin
  if HTTPSendRequest(pRequest, nil, 0, nil, 0) then
    while InternetReadFile(pRequest, @Buffer, SizeOf(Buffer)-1 {leave room for terminator}, BytesRead) do
      begin
      Buffer[BytesRead+1] := #0;
      Result := Result + buffer;
      end
  else
    begin
    InternetCloseHandle(pRequest);
    RaiseLastOSerror; // HTTPSendRequest failed
    end;
  InternetCloseHandle(pRequest);
  end
else RaiseLastOSerror; // HTTPOpenRequest failed
end;

but that seems a lot uglier and more confusing at first glance.

Is it safe to assume InternetCloseHandle() won't fail, thereby allowing the simpler code?

share|improve this question

4 Answers 4

up vote 2 down vote accepted

I think you are going about this the wrong way. You should simply check for errors on each API call and raise an exception as soon as you encounter one. That way you get the error message appropriate to the error that produces the exception. You simply can't expect to carry on calling other API functions and then raise an exception for an error that happened some time ago.

I think you want something along these lines:

Result := '';
pRequest := HTTPOpenRequest(pConnection, 'GET', pchar(localpath), nil, nil, nil, 0, 0);
if pRequest=nil then
  RaiseLastOSerror;
try
  CheckWin32Error(HTTPSendRequest(pRequest, nil, 0, nil, 0));
  while InternetReadFile(pRequest, @Buffer, SizeOf(Buffer)-1, BytesRead) do begin
    Buffer[BytesRead+1] := #0;
    Result := Result + buffer;
  end;
  if GetLastError<>0 then
    RaiseLastOSerror;
finally
  CheckWin32Error(InternetCloseHandle(pRequest));
end;

Note that you didn't include any error checking for InternetReadFile. I've attempted to write it for you.

share|improve this answer
    
I assume you mean Win32check. –  Witness Protection ID 44583292 Jul 5 '11 at 14:52
    
although it remains unanswered whether InternetCloseHandle will ever fail, this code is the best solution. –  Witness Protection ID 44583292 Jul 5 '11 at 14:58
2  
@mike The documentation states that it can fail. I think you have to assume that it can. That said, it's a moot point whether raising an error will do any good, but I also suspect it would never happen. –  David Heffernan Jul 5 '11 at 15:03

First of all this kind of code is not helpful:

raise Exception.Create(IntToStr(GetLastError))

Use this instead:

RaiseLastOsError; // This raises an exception with the description of the error

Since you're using exceptions in your code, how about calling the function like this so it raises an exception if the handle can't be closed?

Win32Check(InternetCloseHandle(H))
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4  
Much better just to call Win32Check(InternetCloseHandle(H)) –  David Heffernan Jul 5 '11 at 14:09
    
@david, changed my answer, thanks. –  Cosmin Prund Jul 5 '11 at 14:15
    
Doesn't answer the question. I don't care if the handle can be closed, I want to raise the Send exception without picking up the error code from attempting to close the handle. –  Witness Protection ID 44583292 Jul 5 '11 at 14:22
    
@mike: Why not do Win32Check or RaiseLastOsError (both of which rely on GetLastError) as soon as possible? If you do like you should, that is, if you do like I suggest in my answer, the InternetCloseHandle will be run even if an exception occurrs. –  Andreas Rejbrand Jul 5 '11 at 14:25

You need to make sure that a handle is 'closed' if it is successfully created. That is, you should do

hReq := HTTPOpenRequest(...);
if hReq <> 0 then
  try      
    // Do stuff
  finally
    InternetCloseHandle(hReq);
  end;
share|improve this answer
    
Doesn't answer the question. The code already closes the handle. The question is whether that can fail before the desired exception is raised. –  Witness Protection ID 44583292 Jul 5 '11 at 14:20
1  
@mike: No, you are wrong. What if HTTPSendRequest or InternetReadFile raises an exception? Then the execution will stop without calling InternetCloseHandle. This is the entire point of the try..finally.. construct in Delphi! –  Andreas Rejbrand Jul 5 '11 at 14:23
    
@mike: Why not do Win32Check or RaiseLastOsError (both of which rely on GetLastError) as soon as possible? If you do like you should, that is, if you do like I suggest in my answer, the InternetCloseHandle will be run even if an exception occurrs. –  Andreas Rejbrand Jul 5 '11 at 14:26
    
Isn't it true HTTPSendRequest and InternetReadFile don't generate exceptions, they return false or nil to indicate failure? –  Witness Protection ID 44583292 Jul 5 '11 at 14:28
    
@mike, according to the documentation the function has a return value that shows failure and invites you to call GetLastError if that happens. There you have it, this literally answers your question. But that's true for virtually all API calls, the art is in handling those errors. –  Cosmin Prund Jul 5 '11 at 14:30

Looking at SOAPHTTPTrans, there are many calls to InternetCloseHandle. Although many appear within Except blocks, none are PROTECTED by one. So it appears that Codegear (mine is D2006) assumes that it won't fail.

share|improve this answer
    
No, it means that InternetCloseHandle doesn't raise exceptions. –  Marcelo Cantos Feb 14 '12 at 6:03

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