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Can someone explain why the following doesn't work? It complains that:

The method add(C) in the type List is not applicable for the arguments (Generics.Person)

import java.util.ArrayList;
import java.util.List;

public class Generics<C extends Comparable<C>> {

  static class Person implements Comparable<Person> {
    public final String name, city;

    public Person(String name, String city) {
      this.name = name;
      this.city = city;
    }

    @Override
    public int compareTo(Person that) {
      return 0;
    }
  }

  public Generics() {
    List<C> persons = new ArrayList<C>();
    persons.add(new Person(null, null));
  }

  // however, this one works, but it gives a warning
  // about Comparable being a raw type
  public Generics() {
    List<Comparable> persons = new ArrayList<Comparable>();
    persons.add(new Person(null, null));
  }
}

So, basically, what I want is a generic List of Comparables, to which I can add any type that implements Comparable.

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3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

To be allowed to do what you need to do you should specify the type parameter of the Generics class from outside:

Generics<Person> generic = new Generics<Person>();

Otherwise you are just adding a Person to a list which has an unbound type variable, this is not allowed. While using the Generics class with a free type variable you must not make any assumption on the type of C.

To see a clear example think about having a second class Place extends Comparable<Place>. According to what you are trying to do you should be allowed to do the following:

public Generics() {
    List<C> persons = new ArrayList<C>();
    persons.add(new Person(null, null));
    persons.add(new Place());
  }

since also Place is a valid candidate. Then which would be the type of type variable C? Mind that there is no unification process that tries to guess the right type of C according to what you are adding to the list, and finally you should see C not as a "whatever type as long as it fulfills the constraints" but as a "specified type that fulfills the constraints",

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Isn't the type of C any type that implements Comparable? –  Ionuț G. Stan Jul 5 '11 at 14:06
    
C is not a type. C is a type variable. Until you don't specify the exact type on which you are currently working you cannot add specific elements. –  Jack Jul 5 '11 at 14:06
    
Well, both Person and Place implement Comparable. So, I should be able to write persons.get(0).compareTo(null). That's what I'm really interested in. –  Ionuț G. Stan Jul 5 '11 at 14:12
    
I think I've got it... so I can't do this because later on, someone might try to do persons.get(0).compareTo(persons.get(1)/* which is a Place instance */), and then, clearly the compareTo method in Person, doesn't know how to compare itself with a Place. –  Ionuț G. Stan Jul 5 '11 at 14:14
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The List<C> you declare is a List of C's (where C is the generic type parameter you pass in.) You're trying to add a Student to it directly, though. That's not going to work, since the List might not be of Students.

If you know the List will be of Students, then declare it as such (List<Student>.) If not, then you need to pass in a C to your method, and then add that directly.

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The List should contain elements that implement Comparable. That's all I want from that list, and I don't understand how to write it without any casts or warnings about raw types. –  Ionuț G. Stan Jul 5 '11 at 14:13
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Ok, so the problem is that you are using generics incorrectly (obviously, since that's what compiler is complaining about). In your constructor you say you have a List which will take objects of type C. However, Person is not of type C! Or not necessarily. Say you create a new instance of Generics like this:

Generics<Integer> foo = new Generics<Integer>();

This would be legit, since Integer does extend comparable. However, you need to imagine that this would result in your first line of code in the constructor "to be translated" to

List<Integer> persons = new ArrayList<Integer>();

Clearly, you can't add a Person object to this list ;)

Following code works like a charm:

import java.util.ArrayList;
import java.util.List;

public class Generics<C extends Comparable<C>> {

    static class Person implements Comparable<Person> 
    {
        public final String name, city;

        public Person(String name, String city) 
        {
            this.name = name;
            this.city = city;
        }

        @Override
        public int compareTo(Person that) 
        {
            return 0;
        }
    }

    private List<C> _persons = null;

    public Generics() 
    {
        _persons = new ArrayList<C>();
    }

    public void add(C obj)
    {
        _persons.add(obj);
    }

    public static void foo()
    {
        Generics<Person> ppl = new Generics<Person>();
        ppl.add(new Person(null, null));
    }
}

Not sure I made myself clear, hope you got what I mean!

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Yup, it's a good example. The thing that really stopped me understanding what's going on is that recursive type variable definition <C extends Comparable<C>>, although... it should have been the one to shed the light. –  Ionuț G. Stan Jul 5 '11 at 14:31
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