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I would like a script that removes every table row for which the keyword STRING is found in a cell, but my script seems to remove every other row that contains the STRING keyword. Apparently, every time a row is deleted the numbering of the rows is updated? How would one account for this? Thanks in advance.

<script type="text/javascript">
var table = document.getElementById("DatePreferred").firstChild;
var rowCount = table.rows.length;

for(var i=0; i<rowCount; i++) {
  var row = table.rows[i];
  var text = row.cells[0].innerText;
  if(text.indexOf("STRING")!=-1){
     table.deleteRow(i);
  }
 }
</script>

Edit: So FishBasketGordo's answer got my script to work for IE and Safari but it wasn't working in FF. I looked into where the error was and apparently FF handles .innerText differently. You have to use .textContent instead. So if you add this below to the script above it will use the appropriate method:

if (row.cells[0].textContent){
   var text = row.cells[0].textContent;}
else {var text = row.cells[0].innerText;}
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2 Answers 2

When I need to do something like this, I like to work backward:

for(var i= rowCount - 1; i >= 0; i--) {
    var row = table.rows[i];
    var text = row.cells[0].innerText;
    if(text.indexOf("STRING")!=-1){
        table.deleteRow(i);
    }
}
share|improve this answer
1  
+1, working backwards through the rows is a better idea than screwing around with your counter. –  Anthony Grist Jul 5 '11 at 14:13
    
Thank you that works! I'll try to understand this a little better. –  Usman Jul 5 '11 at 14:14
1  
The basic idea is, when you delete something out of a list, it only affects the indices of the items that come after it, i.e., items that have a greater index. If you work backward, then you've already visited those higher-indexed items, and your loop is still valid for the lower indices that you haven't visited yet. –  FishBasketGordo Jul 5 '11 at 14:17
    
One last question, is there any reason why this would work in IE and Safari but not FF? I'm trying this in FF and it isn't working, but it does for the other two. –  Usman Jul 5 '11 at 14:44
1  
Sorry, I'm not sure exactly why it wouldn't work in FF. Have you tried FireBug (getfirebug.com) to step through the JavaScript in FF? –  FishBasketGordo Jul 5 '11 at 14:51

Just decrement i using i-- when you remove a row, so that your for loop re-examines the same index (which will now contain the next row).

EDIT: Having looked at your code again, you'll want to compare i to table.rows.length rather than your rowCount variable to account for the changing length of table.rows.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks! That works also if i add "i--;" within the if statement. –  Usman Jul 5 '11 at 14:15
    
@Usman While I'm glad that it works, I'd strongly advise you to use the answer @FishBasketGordo provided, since it's a much better practice than what I've suggested. –  Anthony Grist Jul 5 '11 at 14:19

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