Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

First a little setup. Last week I was having trouble implementing a specific methodology that I had constructed which would allow me to manage two unique fields associated with one db.Model object. Since this isn't possible, I created a parent entity class and a child entity class, each having the key_name assigned one of the unique values. You can find my previous question located here, which includes my sample code and a general explaination of my insertion process.

On my original question, someone commented that my solution would not solve my problem of needing two unique fields associated with one db.Model object.

My implementation tried to solve this problem by implementing a static method that creates a ParentEntity and it's key_name property is assigned to one of my unique values. In step two of my process I create a child entity and assign the parent entity to the parent parameter. Both of these steps are executed within a db transaction so I assumed that this would force the uniqueness contraint to work since both of my values were stored within two, separate key_name fields across two separate models.

The commenter pointed out that this solution would not work because when you set a parent to a child entity, the key_name is no longer unique across the entire model but, instead, is unique across the parent-child entries. Bummer...

I believe that I could solve this new problem by changing how these two models are associated with one another.

First, I create a parent object as mentioned above. Next, I create a child entity and assign my second, unique value to it's key_name. The difference is that the second entity has a reference property to the parent model. My first entity is assigned to the reference property but not to the parent parameter. This does not force a one-to-one reference but it does keep both of my values unique and I can manage the one-to-one nature of these objects so long as I can control the insertion process from within a transaction.

This new solution is still problematic. According to the GAE Datastore documentation you can not execute multiple db updates in one transaction if the various entities within the update are not of the same entity group. Since I no longer make my first entity a parent of the second, they are no longer part of the same entity group and can not be inserted within the same transaction.

I'm back to square one. What can I do to solve this problem? Specifically, what can I do to enforce two, unique values associated with one Model entity. As you can see, I am willing to get a bit creative. Can this be done? I know this will involve an out-of-the-box solution but there has to be a way.

Below is my original code from my question I posted last week. I've added a few comments and code changes to implement my second attempt at solving this problem.

class ParentEntity(db.Model):
    str1_key =  db.StringProperty()
    str2 =      db.StringProperty()

    @staticmethod
    def InsertData(string1, string2, string3):
        try:
            def txn():
                #create first entity
                prt = ParentEntity(
                    key_name=string1, 
                    str1_key=string1, 
                    str2=string2)
                prt.put()

                #create User Account Entity
                    child = ChildEntity(
                    key_name=string2, 
                    #parent=prt, #My prt object was previously the parent of child
                    parentEnt=prt,
                    str1=string1, 
                    str2_key=string2,
                    str3=string3,)
                child.put()
                return child
            #This should give me an error, b/c these two entities are no longer in the same entity group. :(
            db.run_in_transaction(txn)
        except Exception, e:
            raise e

class ChildEntity(db.Model):
    #foreign and primary key values
    str1 =      db.StringProperty()
    str2_key =  db.StringProperty()

    #This is no longer a "parent" but a reference
    parentEnt = db.ReferenceProperty(reference_class=ParentEntity)
    #pertinent data below
    str3 =      db.StringProperty()
share|improve this question
3  
I believe enforcing uniqueness on 2 properties is impossible without putting all of your entities in the same entity group (which will scale horribly), and ensuring that all writes are done in a transaction that checks for both properties' existence before writing a new entity. I hope someone will answer and prove me wrong. –  Wooble Jul 5 '11 at 14:49
    
These writes should be considerably infrequent when compared to the number of reads. If this project were to "take off" and become wildly popular, I wouldn't see any more than, say, 1,000 write operations like this, per day during the peak usage. I would assume that would be manageable by the GAE. –  RLH Jul 5 '11 at 14:54
1  
Do you need to reassign the values of each of the unique "keys" or do you just need the equivalent of two unique ids? Do they need to be strings? are they generated somewhere else in your app? I'm struggling a bit to see what you are trying to do. –  Chris Farmiloe Jul 5 '11 at 15:17
    
@Chris F: Well, you are struggling with seeing a "need" by design. I've learned in the past that when you state the reason behind your code, often conversations degrade into reasons of why you should "never do it that way" but in those cases I rarely get answers to the underlying problem. So, I ask questions that present generic problems without the reason for needing it. In regards to your question, yes, the two unique fields are both strings and they are determined by user input. They are not and can not be random and will never be updated once inserted. –  RLH Jul 5 '11 at 15:45

2 Answers 2

The system you describe will work, at the cost of transactionality. Note that the second entity is no longer a child entity - it's just another entity with a ReferenceProperty.

This solution may be sufficient to your needs - for instance, if you need to enforce that every user has a unique email address, but this is not your primary identifier for a user, you can insert a record into an 'emails' table first, then if that succeeds, insert your primary record. If a failure occurs after the first operation but before the second, you have an email address associated with no record. You can simply ignore this, or timestamp the record and allow it to be reclaimed after some period of time (for example, 30 seconds, the maximum length of a frontend request).

If your requirements on transactionality and uniqueness are stronger than that, there are other options with increasing levels of complexity, such as implementing some form of distributed transactions, but it's unlikely you'll actually need that. If you can tell us more about the nature of the records and the unique keys, we may be able to provide more detailed suggestions.

share|improve this answer
    
Nick, excellent article, however I believe I have found another solution. I will post it below soon. Please review and comment (read: beat it to death explaining the pitfalls of my new approach.) If my method is sound, please let me know as well. I may need the functionality in your article in the near the future for actual monetary transfers. –  RLH Jul 6 '11 at 13:53
    
Nick J: Although this isn't the solution I've been looking for, I'm up voting all of your comments because they have been quite helpful. Thanks for taking the time to follow this post. –  RLH Jul 11 '11 at 12:27
up vote 0 down vote accepted

After scratching my head a bit, last night I decided to go with the following solution. I would assume that this still provides a bit of undesirable overhead for many scenarios, however, I think the overhead may be acceptable for my needs.

The code posted below is a further modification of the code in my question. Most notably, I've created another Model class, called named EGEnforcer (which stands for Entity Group Enforcer.)

The idea is simple. If a transaction can only update multiple records if they are associated with one entity group, I must find a way to associate each of my records that contains my unique values with the same entity group.

To do this, I create an EGEnforcer entry when the application initially starts. Then, when the need arises to make a new entry into my models, I query the EGEnforcer for the record associated with my paired models. After I get my EGEnforcer record, I make it the parent of both records. Viola! My data is now all associated with the same entity group.

Since the *key_name* parameter is unique only across the parent-key_name groups, this should inforce my uniqueness constraints because all of my FirstEntity (previously ParentEntity) entries will have the same parent. Likewise, my SecondEntity (previously ChildEntity) should also have a unique value stored as the key_name because the parent is also always the same.

Since both entities also have the same parent, I can execute these entries within the same transaction. If one fails, they all fail.

#My new class containing unique entries for each pair of models associated within one another.
class EGEnforcer(db.Model): 
KEY_NAME_EXAMPLE = 'arbitrary unique value'

    @staticmethod
    setup():
        ''' This only needs to be called once for the lifetime of the application. setup() inserts a record into EGEnforcer that will be used as a parent for FirstEntity and SecondEntity entries.  '''
        ege = EGEnforcer.get_or_insert(EGEnforcer.KEY_NAME_EXAMPLE)
    return ege

class FirstEntity(db.Model):
    str1_key =  db.StringProperty()
    str2 =      db.StringProperty()

    @staticmethod
    def InsertData(string1, string2, string3):
        try:
            def txn():
                ege = EGEnforcer.get_by_key_name(EGEnforcer.KEY_NAME_EXAMPLE)
                prt = FirstEntity(
                    key_name=string1, 
                    parent=ege) #Our EGEnforcer record.
                prt.put()

                child = SecondEntity(
                    key_name=string2, 
                    parent=ege, #Our EGEnforcer record.
                    parentEnt=prt,
                    str1=string1, 
                    str2_key=string2,
                    str3=string3)
                child.put()
                return child
        #This works because our entities are now part of the same entity group
            db.run_in_transaction(txn)
        except Exception, e:
            raise e

class SecondEntity(db.Model):
    #foreign and primary key values
    str1 =      db.StringProperty()
    str2_key =  db.StringProperty()

    #This is no longer a "parent" but a reference
    parentEnt = db.ReferenceProperty(reference_class=ParentEntity)

#Other data...
    str3 =      db.StringProperty()

One quick note-- Nick Johnson pinned my need for this solution:

This solution may be sufficient to your needs - for instance, if you need to enforce that every user has a unique email address, but this is not your primary identifier for a user, you can insert a record into an 'emails' table first, then if that succeeds, insert your primary record.

This is exactly what I need but my solution is, obviously, a bit different than your suggestion. My method allows for the transaction to completely occur or completely fail. Specifically, when a user creates an account, they first login to their Google account. Next, they are forced to the account creation page if there is no entry associated with their Google account in SecondEntity (which is actually UserAccount form my actual scenario.) If the insertion process fails, they are redirected to the creation page with the reason for this failure.

This could be because their ID is not unique or, potentially, a transactional timeout. If there is a timeout on the insertion of their new user account, I will want to know about it but I will implement some form of checks-and-balance in the near future. For now I simply want to go live, but this uniqueness constraint is an absolute necessity.

Being that my approach is strictly for account creation, and my user account data will not change once created, I believe that this should work and scale well for quite a while. I'm open for comments if this is incorrect.

share|improve this answer
1  
Updates to a single entity group are limited to ~1 per second. You're imposing a huge scalability limitation on your system by doing this. –  Nick Johnson Jul 7 '11 at 0:12
    
Will the transactional implementation that you recommended from the linked article in your answer help solve this problem? I didn't use that method because I wanted to updates to be near-immediate (meaning they would occur within a few seconds). –  RLH Jul 7 '11 at 14:05
1  
It won't have global contention issues. I'm not sure if you could apply it to this, though. If you really do just need to ensure only one user has a given email address (or other unique value), though, I would strongly recommend just taking the simpler but non-atomic option. –  Nick Johnson Jul 8 '11 at 0:09
    
In my case, I need a login system (which provides only an email address as a unique value from Google) and a unique ID that other users can use to access another user's "profile" style page by going to an address similar to mydomain.com/[other user's unique id] IDs need to be short(preferably 3-5 characters) so using the email address isn't sufficient. –  RLH Jul 8 '11 at 12:12
1  
Why not use a datastore counter to assign IDs? It guarantees uniqueness simply by the way it's assigned, and you can encode it in base64 to make it shorter. If you're using the Users API, bear in mind that you should use the user_id as the user's internal identifier, not the email address, as users can change their email address. –  Nick Johnson Jul 10 '11 at 2:47

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.