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In the MainWindow.xaml, I set:

<Window.DataContext>
  <vm:MainViewModel/>
</Window.DataContext>

In the App.xaml file, I added the following:

<Application.Resources>
  <DataTemplate DataType="vm:MainViewModel">
    <v:MainView/>
  </DataTemplate>
</Application.Resources>

I was hoping the MainWindow will automatically load and show the MainView with its DataContext property set to the windows's one (which was set to MainViewModel at design-time as above), but it won't work - the MainWindow doesn't use the DataTemplate set in App.xaml.

Any better ideas for this scenario?

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2 Answers 2

up vote 4 down vote accepted

You should make a minor changes -

First, in your window. Try this:

<Window>
  <!-- setup window... -->

  <ContentPresenter>
      <ContentPresenter.Content>
          <vm:MainViewModel/>
      </ContentPresenter.Content>
  </ContentPresenter>      
</Window>

This creates a single content item within your Window. DataTemplates work by mapping content to a new View - in this case, since the Content here is the MainViewModel, it will automatically create and instantiate a new MainView for you. Setting the DataContext will not trigger DataTemplates, since you're never making the ViewModel "content" of an object.

You can shorten this by just setting the Window's Content directly, if you prefer:

<Window>
  <Window.Content>
    <vm:MainViewModel/>
  </Window.Content>
</Window>

Or, even, binding the Content to the DataContext (though this only makes sense if you need the DataContext set for some other purpose):

<Window Content="{Binding}">
  <Window.DataContext>
    <vm:MainViewModel/>
  </Window.DataContext>
</Window>
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Is there a more generic way to make it rely on the App.xaml settings? –  Shimmy Jul 5 '11 at 16:28
1  
@Shimmy: What are you trying to do? What you had put in place is effectively trying to "turn the Window into a MainView", which will not work. You need to set the content of the Window, at some point, to your ViewModel, and it works. You can actually just use <Window.Content><vm:MainViewModel /></Window.Content> instead of putting in a ContentPresenter, if you'd like (I just feel the other is a bit more clear...) –  Reed Copsey Jul 5 '11 at 16:32
    
I've updated your answer for clarity and brevity. That answered my question. –  Shimmy Jul 5 '11 at 17:25
    
@Shimmy: Personally, I would just set the Content, and leave the DataContext alone... but you can do it this way, too, if you prefer ;) –  Reed Copsey Jul 5 '11 at 17:53
    
Once you've set the Content, there's really no reason at all to set DataContext like this.... –  Reed Copsey Jul 5 '11 at 17:54

I think you need

<DataTemplate DataType="{x:Type vm:MainViewModel}">

EDIT:

I really don't think I'm wrong, the code

<Window.DataContext>
    <WpfApplication1:ViewModel />
</Window.DataContext>
<Window.Resources>
    <DataTemplate DataType="{x:Type WpfApplication1:ViewModel}">
        <TextBlock>Custom template</TextBlock>
    </DataTemplate>
</Window.Resources>
<ContentPresenter Content="{Binding}" />

shows “Custom template”. If I remove the x:Type, what's shown instead is “WpfApplication1.ViewModel”, which is the result of calling ToString() on the view model object. This is used in the absence of a DataTemplate.

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1  
"{x:Type vm:MainViewModel}" is essentially just the same as "vm:MainViewModel". WPF has a type convertor that interprets the string as it would have been a type, so unfortunately it doesn't help. –  Shimmy Jul 5 '11 at 16:16
    
@Shimmy, yeah but that type converter isn't applied for DataType, because its type is object. So you need to use x:Type, the documentaion even mentions it. –  svick Jul 5 '11 at 16:24
    
you're wrong. The documentation metioned that you should use typename which can be interpreted from a string. –  Shimmy Jul 5 '11 at 16:27
1  
This can be required at times - From: msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/ms753322.aspx - "In specific framework implementations, some properties that take Type as a value can accept the name of the type directly" This will typically work (without the markup extension), however, there are scenarios where it fails. In general, I prefer using the {x:Type extension for clarity, but it is not always required. –  Reed Copsey Jul 5 '11 at 16:41
    
@Shimmy, I think the documentation is wrong at least at one count: x:Type is not used to refer to a type name, it's used to refer to the Type object. –  svick Jul 5 '11 at 16:45

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