Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

So I want to exequte TCL code inside my programm. I want it to be capable of reaching some of my C++ functions and classes. So I use C++/TCL. All general TCL to C++ binding works fine for me. But now I want to have some little UI on top (so I have lot on general TCL code that interacts with my app and now I want to add Tk gui to it.) How to create simple tk button inside of the window with some name I want using C++/TCL? I do not want to use C++/TK at all.

Update What have I tried:

Put all Tk (.tcl) files into ../../tk folder and try this... it fails

#include <string>
#include "cpptcl.h"

int main(int argc, char *argv[])
{
    std::string script = 
        "package require Tcl 8.5\n"
        "set auto_path [linsert $auto_path 0 [file join [file dirname [info script]] ../../tk]]\n"
        "package require Tk 8.5\n";
    Tcl::interpreter tcl_interpreter;
    tcl_interpreter.eval(script);
    return 0;
}

Also I tried stuff like

#include <string>
#include "cpptcl.h"
int main(int argc, char *argv[])
{
    std::string script = 
        "package require Tcl 8.5\n"
        "foreach tkFile [glob -nocomplain -directory ../../tk *] {\n"
        "    source $tkFile\n"
        "}\n"
        "package require Tk 8.5\n";
    Tcl::interpreter tcl_interpreter;
    tcl_interpreter.eval(script);
    return 0;
}

Which also fails.

Also I tried to put tk85.dll near to my app and call

#include <string>
#include "cpptcl.h"
int main(int argc, char *argv[])
{
    std::string script = 
        "package require Tcl 8.5\n"
        "load tk85.dll \n";
    Tcl::interpreter tcl_interpreter;
    tcl_interpreter.eval(script);
    return 0;
}

and this

#include <string>
#include "cpptcl.h"
int main(int argc, char *argv[])
{
    std::string script = 
        "package require Tcl 8.5\n"
        "interp create slave \n"
        "load {} Tk slave \n"
    ;
    Tcl::interpreter tcl_interpreter;
    tcl_interpreter.eval(script);
    return 0;
}

as described here. this also fails.

This

#include <string>
#include "cpptcl.h"

int main(int argc, char *argv[])
{
    std::string script = 
        "package require Tcl 8.5\n"
        " interp create a\n"
        " a eval {set argv {-display :0}; package require Tk; button \".b\" -text \"Say Hello\"; pack \".b\" -padx 20 -pady 6;}\n"
        ;
    Tcl::interpreter tcl_interpreter;
    tcl_interpreter.eval(script);
    std::cin.get();
    return 0;
}

compiles and runs but does not show ani window or anething else.(

What to do? How to load Tk?

share|improve this question
    
What goes wrong? You get an error? The UI appears and then the program exits immediately? No UI, and the program exits? –  Ben Voigt Jul 5 '11 at 17:46
    
some horrable error on line 895 of cpptcl.cc –  Rella Jul 5 '11 at 17:55
    
No UI, and the program exits. –  Rella Jul 5 '11 at 17:55
    
You're never processing data arriving from the X server, so the GUI cannot be drawn. You need to use Tcl's event loop, that's how Tk interacts with the X server. –  Ben Voigt Jul 5 '11 at 18:01

1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

You haven't said what fails, but this isn't going to work. To have a GUI, you need an event loop.

I'd recommend a different approach: make your C++ code into a Tcl-loadable module, then your script can run under wish and use both Tk and your objects implemented in C++.

share|improve this answer
    
Cant explain wh but sadly that is not an option for me... I just do not get why if we are allowed to load Tk dinamically into TCL (tclsh) as desctibed here we cant do it from C++\TCL? –  Rella Jul 5 '11 at 17:43
    
@Kabumbus: At least the code you are showing, is not using the Tcl main loop. UI elements won't appear without that main loop (which is overridden by Tk at load time). See tmml.sourceforge.net/doc/tcl/Tcl_Main.html –  Ben Voigt Jul 5 '11 at 17:45
    
@Kamumbus: If you've got a properly configured Tcl/Tk 8.5 installation, dynamic loading will work (it won't necessarily with 8.4 though; getting that supported was an 8.5 feature). But you've still got to run the event loop by doing something that calls Tcl_DoOneEvent, directly or indirectly. (Only tclsh and wish can get away without doing it explicitly, and that's because they've got some extra special magic hacks in the background.) If all else fails, run the event loop using the Tcl command vwait forever; the forever is just an arbitrary variable name. –  Donal Fellows Jul 5 '11 at 19:11
    
Side note: do not run vwait twice in the same program if you can possibly help it. Reentering the event loop can cause many subtle problems. –  Donal Fellows Jul 5 '11 at 19:14

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.