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This may be a futile question.

I have written/am writing a piece of physics analysis code, initially for myself, that will now hopefully be used and extended by a small group of physicists. None of us are C++ gurus. I have put together a small framework that abstracts the "physics event" data into objects acted on by a chain of tools that can easily be swapped in and out depending on the analysis requirements.

This has created two halves to the code: the "physics analysis" code that manipulates the event objects and produces our results via derivatives of a base "Tool"; and the "structural" code that attaches input files, splits the job into parallel runs, links tools into a chain according to some script, etc.

The problem is this: for others to make use of the code it is essential that every user should be able to follow every single step that modifies the event data in any way. The (many) extra lines of difficult structural code could therefore be daunting, unless it is obviously and demonstrably peripheral to the physics. Worse, looking at it in too much detail might give people ideas - and I'd rather they didn't edit the structural code without very good reason - and most importantly they must not introduce anything that affects the physics.

I would like to be able to:

  • A) demonstrate in an obvious way that the structural code does not edit the event data in any way
  • B) enforce this once other users begin extending the code themselves (none of us are expert, and the physics always comes first - translation: anything not bolted down is fair game for a nasty hack)

In my ideal scenario the event data would be private, with the derived physics tools inheriting access from the Tool base class. Of course in reality this is not allowed. I hear there are good reasons for this, but that's not the issue.

Unfortunately, in this case the method of calling getters/setters from the base (which is a friend) would create more problems than it solves - the code should be as clean, as easy to follow, and as connected to the physics as possible in the implementation of the tool itself (a user should not need to be an expert in either C++ or the inner workings of the program to create a tool).

Given that I have a trusted base class and any derivatives will be subject to close scrutiny, is there any other roundabout but well tested way of allowing access to only these derivatives? Or any way of denying access to the derivatives of some other base?

Thanks in advance.


Thanks everyone for your replies. To clarify the situation I have something like

class Event
{
    // The event data (particle collections etc)
};

class Tool
{
    public:
        virtual bool apply(Event* ev) = 0;
};

class ExampleTool : public Tool
{
    public:
        bool apply(Event* ev)
        {
            // do something like loop over the electron collection
            // and throw away those will low energy
        }
};

The ideal would be to limit access to the contents of Event to only these tools for the two reasons (A and B) above.

Thanks everyone for the solutions proposed. I think, as I suspected, the perfect solution I was wishing for is impossible. dribeas' solution would be perfect in any other setting, but its precisely in the apply() function that the code needs to be as clear and succinct as possible as we will basically spend all day writing/editing apply() functions, and will also need to understand every line of these written by each of the others. Its not so much about capability as readability and effort. I do like the preprocessor solution from "Useless". It doesn't really enforce the separation, but someone would need to be genuinely malicious to break it. To those who suggested a library, I think this will definitely be a good first step, but doesn't really address the two main issues (as I'll still need to provide the source anyway).

Thanks all.

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2  
If no one who needs to work with or look at the source is an expert at C++, then don't use C++. C++ is a nasty language for those not expert at it and unlikely to become expert, especially if heavy OO techniques are in use. –  DarenW Jul 5 '11 at 16:51
    
This sounds familiar... who or what owns the event data? Are these user tools supposed to change the event data, or use it to produce new event data? –  juanchopanza Jul 5 '11 at 16:58
    
@DarenW, I strongly suspect OP has no choice here... –  juanchopanza Jul 5 '11 at 16:59
    
Is there anyway you can compile it as a library? And not given them the source? –  Mikhail Jul 5 '11 at 17:07
    
You seem to have a couple of contradictory goals here. If a "tool" can modify the events, and "stuctural code" can weild a "tool", then "structural code" can thereby modify the events, yes? –  Beta Jul 5 '11 at 17:11
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3 Answers

There are three access qualifiers in C++: public, protected and private. The sentence with the derived physics tools inheriting access from the Tool base class seems to indicate that you want protected access, but it is not clear whether the actual data that is private is in Tool (and thus protected suffices) or is currently private in a class that befriends Tool.

In the first case, just make the data protected:

class Tool {
protected:
   type data;
};

In the second case, you can try to play nasty tricks on the language, like for example, providing an accessor at the Tool level:

class Data {
   type this_is_private;
   friend class Tool;
};
class Tool {
protected:
   static type& gain_acces_to_data( Data& d ) { 
       return d.this_is_private;
   }
};
class OneTool : public Tool {
public:
   void foo( Data& d ) {
      operate_on( gain_access_to_data(d) );      
   }
};

But I would avoid it altogether. There is a point where access specifiers stop making sense. They are tools to avoid mistakes, not to police your co-workers, and the fact is that as long as you want them to write code that will need access to that data (Tool extensions) you might as well forget about having absolute protection: you cannot.

A user that wants to gain access to the data might as well just use the newly created backdoor to do so:

struct Evil : Tool {
   static type& break_rule( Data & d ) {
      return gain_access_to_data( d );
   }
};

And now everyone can simply use Evil as a door to Data. I recommend that you read the C++FAQ-lite for more insight on C++.

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(+1) For describing a program problem, with a code example, even if sounds obvious ;-) –  umlcat Jul 5 '11 at 18:07
    
Thanks for the suggestion. The situation with Evil would be fine - I have tracking and logging built into the Tool base class and all tools and their settings are saved into the program output along with the configuration script. If the logged tools don't match the script then its obvious someone is being evil - if they do match the script then its doing what you asked it to do. But thanks for the warning. –  Anthony Jul 6 '11 at 15:04
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Provide the code as a library with headers to be used by whoever wants to create tools. This nicely encapsulates the stuff you want to keep intact. It's impossible to prevent hacks if everyone has access to the source and are keen to make changes to anything.

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There is also the C-style approach, of restricting visibility rather than access rights. It is enforced more by convention and (to some extent) your build system, rather than the language - although you could use a sort of include guard to prevent "accidental" leakage of the Tool implementation details into the structural code.

-- ToolInterface.hpp --
class Event; // just forward declare it

class ToolStructuralInterface
{
    // only what the structural code needs to invoke tools
    virtual void invoke(std::list<Event*> &) = 0;
};

-- ToolImplementation.hpp --
class Event
{
    // only the tool code sees this header
};
// if you really want to prevent accidental inclusion in the structural code
#define TOOL_PRIVATE_VISIBILITY

-- StructuralImplementation.hpp --
...
#ifdef TOOL_PRIVATE_VISIBILITY
#error "someone leaked tool implementation details into the structural code"
#endif
...

Note that this kind of partitioning lends itself to putting the tool and structural code in seperate libraries - you might even be able to restrict access to the structural code seperately to the tool code, and just share headers and the compiled library.

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