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I have the following code

public abstract class Event {
    public void fire(Object... args) {
        // tell the event handler that if there are free resources it should call 
        // doEventStuff(args)
    }

    // this is not correct, but I basically want to be able to define a generic 
    // return type and be able to pass generic arguments. (T... args) would also 
    // be ok
    public abstract <T, V> V doEventStuff(T args);
}

public class A extends Event {
   // This is what I want to do
   @Overide
   public String doEventStuff(String str) {
      if(str == "foo") { 
         return "bar";
      } else {
         return "fail";
      }
   }
}

somewhere() {
  EventHandler eh = new EventHandler();
  Event a = new A();
  eh.add(a);
  System.out.println(a.fire("foo")); //output is bar
}

However I don't know how to do this, as I cannot override doEventStuff with something specific.

Does anyone know how to do this?

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How is T defined? –  blank Jul 5 '11 at 16:48
2  
Since the generic parameters don't appear anywhere else, the method signature is broadly equivalent to public abstract Object doEventStuff(Object args). It's a method which takes anything as an argument, and returns something. Are you sure this is what you intended? If not, you likely want to define the T and/or V parameters on the Event class, not just for the method. –  Andrzej Doyle Jul 5 '11 at 16:49
2  
Also, be aware that if(str == "foo") { is probably wrong and you need something like if("foo".equals(str)) { –  Pablo Grisafi Jul 5 '11 at 16:54
    
Thx for the "foo".equals... this would have messed lots of things up, if it went unnoticed. –  iuiz Jul 5 '11 at 16:58
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2 Answers 2

up vote 10 down vote accepted

It's not really clear what you're trying to do, but perhaps you just need to make Event itself generic:

public abstract class Event<T, V>
{
    public abstract V doEventStuff(T args);
}

public class A extends Event<String, String>
{
    @Overide public String doEventStuff(String str)
    {
        ...
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
This is what I wanted to do :). This is realy easier then I thought. Thank you very much. –  iuiz Jul 5 '11 at 16:56
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Your using generics but you are not provided a binding.

public abstract class Event<I, O> { //<-- I is input O is Output
    public abstract O doEventStuff(I args);
}

public class A extends Event<String, String> { //<-- binding in the impl.

@Overide
   public String doEventStuff(String str) {
}
}

Or simpler with only one generic binding...

public abstract class Event<T> { //<-- only one provided
    public abstract T doEventStuff(T args);
}

public class A extends Event<String> { //<-- binding the impl.

@Overide
   public String doEventStuff(String str) {
}
}
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