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I am using file::find to walk a directory structure and print it out, but I am having trouble excluding hidden files. Here is what I have so far:

find(\&todo, $start_dir);
sub todo 
{
  if ($_ =~ /^./) 
  {
     print "hidden file $_\n";
  }
  else
  {
    if (-f $_) #check for file
    {
      file;
    }
    elsif (-d $_) #check for directory
    {
      directory($File::Find::dir);
    }
    else
    {
       print "ERROR: $_\n";
    }
  }
}        

If I remove the if ($_ =~ /^./) check, the files and directories work fine, but adding this prints everything as a hidden file. As you can see, I only need this to work on unix. Can anyone point me in the right direction?

EDIT: I forgot a backslash in front of the . - should be if ($_ =~ /^./), but does find() have a default way of ignoring hidden files/directories? Thanks!

share|improve this question
    
This ended up working: if (!(($_ =~ /^\./) || ($File::Find::dir =~ m/[.]/))) – Ryan Washburn Jul 5 '11 at 19:01

. in a regex matches any character; use \. to match a literal .. And you probably should learn about regexes.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks. I'll be sure to read up. I feel like Perl probably has a better way to just ignore hidden files using find(), but I haven't found any ways by searching...does that functionality not exist? – Ryan Washburn Jul 5 '11 at 18:17
    
File::Find just gives you files, and it's up to your wanted function to select the ones you want. It makes no attempt to handle anything other than automatically recursing into directories. – geekosaur Jul 5 '11 at 18:22

See geekosaur for an explanation of your problem. In a simple case like this, substr might be a better call than a regular expression:

if(substr($_, 0, 1) eq '.') {

Regular expressions are a great tool but they shouldn't be the only thing in your toolbox.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks, this accomplishes the same thing right? My problem now is that it still goes through the hidden directories...is there a way to modify find() to ignore hidden files/directories? – Ryan Washburn Jul 5 '11 at 18:23
    
@Ryan: It accomplishes the same thing as if($_ =~ /^\./). And I think geekosaur is sorting you out on how File::Find works, right? – mu is too short Jul 5 '11 at 19:02

The /^./ is a regular expression. The period means any single character, so what you're saying is match any string that starts with any character, and that pretty much matches all file names.

You need to put a backslash before the period, or use the \Q and '\E'. The \Q disables matching on metacharacters which means it basically removes all magic and makes everything a plain ol' string. In this circumstance, the backslash would be better, but you can imagine trying to match something a bit more complex, and the \Q and \E would work better:

Either of these will work:

 if ($_ =~ /^\./) 
 {
     print "hidden file $_\n";
 }


 if ($_ =~ /^\Q.\E/) 
 {
     print "hidden file $_\n";
 }
share|improve this answer

If you are on Windows the perl module Win32::File will tell you whether a file is hidden or not. Win32::File is installed by default in ActivePerl.

Unfortunately Win32::File doesn't come with any examples, (I wish cpan added a comment feature to every page like the PHP site. Sure there's Annocpan, but that extra click means almost no one ever contributes to it), but this thread will help http://www.perlmonks.org/?node_id=194011

There's also the nicer object oriented Win32::File::Object but it only works with files unless you apply this patch :( https://rt.cpan.org/Public/Bug/Display.html?id=60735

Results seem weird though as lots of files you don't except to be hidden or system turn out to be both. I gave up in the end and just hacked this to ignore certain folders:

if( $_ =~ /(RECYCLER)|(System Volume Information)/ ) {
    $File::Find::prune = 1;
}
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