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If I wanted to fill a structure from a binary file, I would use something like this:

using (BinaryReader br = new BinaryReader(File.Open(filename, FileMode.Open)))
{
    myStruct.ID = br.ReadSingle();
    myStruct.name = br.ReadBytes(20);
}

However, I must read the whole file into a byte array before deserializing, because I want to do some pre-processing. Is there any managed way to fill my structure from the byte array, preferably similar to the one above?

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2  
MemoryStream ? –  Nate Jul 5 '11 at 18:09
4  
You should consider making your type serializable. If that is something you are interested in, i will provide a sample. See "BinaryFormatter" for Binary Serialization. –  GlennFerrie Jul 5 '11 at 18:10
1  
In my experience BinaryFormatter is rarely the correct choice for serializing data. –  CodesInChaos Jul 5 '11 at 19:08
1  
That depends very much on the situation. I usually need a well defined file format, so I use something like Linq-to-Json or Linq-to-Xml to transform between my in-memory representation and the file format. Sometimes protobuf is nice because it's very compact. And in some rare cases, if you don't need versioning and can live with its deeply invasive nature BinaryFormatter can be the right choice. A savegame in a game is one of the few cases that fits BinaryFormatter IMO. –  CodesInChaos Jul 5 '11 at 19:24
1  
Another big issue about the BinaryFormatter is that you must trust the file absolutely. Whoever created the file is most likely able to execute code in the context of your program. –  CodesInChaos Jul 5 '11 at 19:47

3 Answers 3

up vote 13 down vote accepted

This is a sample to take some data (actually a System.Data.DataSet) and serialize to an array of bytes, while compressing using DeflateStream.

try
{
    var formatter = new BinaryFormatter();
    byte[] content;
    using (var ms = new MemoryStream())
    {
         using (var ds = new DeflateStream(ms, CompressionMode.Compress, true))
         {
             formatter.Serialize(ds, set);
         }
         ms.Position = 0;
         content = ms.GetBuffer();
         contentAsString = BytesToString(content);
     }
}
catch (Exception ex) { /* handle exception omitted */ }

Here is the code in reverse to deserialize:

        var set = new DataSet();
        try
        {
            var content = StringToBytes(s);
            var formatter = new BinaryFormatter();
            using (var ms = new MemoryStream(content))
            {
                using (var ds = new DeflateStream(ms, CompressionMode.Decompress, true))
                {
                    set = (DataSet)formatter.Deserialize(ds);                        
                }
            }
        }
        catch (Exception ex)
        {
            // removed error handling logic!
        }

Hope this helps. As Nate implied, we are using MemoryStream here.

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Thanks a lot, this should be more helpful with the big structures. Just a question - does changing the structure alignments affect the deserialization result? –  Joulukuusi Jul 5 '11 at 18:31
    
I think the structure alignment affects serialization and deserialization, but I'm not certain. –  GlennFerrie Jul 5 '11 at 18:33
1  
+1 for throwing in compression, just because you can –  Joel Coehoorn Jul 5 '11 at 18:46
1  
@Angel for the record, I strongly advise against BinaryFormatter for any kind of storage. It has several nasty quirks, and I have honestly lost count of the number of times I've had to help people struggling with lost data etc. Other serializers exist that are (IMO, based on extensive work in serialization) more robust, just a convenient, and much more efficient for both CPU and bandwidth. –  Marc Gravell Jul 5 '11 at 19:23
    
Hey Mark - I am using this sample in code that I am working on now, I was using XmlSerializer, but switched to BinaryFormatter. Should I go back? What are some of the other options? –  GlennFerrie Jul 5 '11 at 19:26

Take a look at the BitConverter class. That might do what you need.

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Thanks for the answer, that class really does what I need. The only small inconvenience is that I need to track the position manually. –  Joulukuusi Jul 5 '11 at 18:24

For very simple structs which aren't Serializable and contain only base types, this works. I use it for parsing files which have a known format. Error checking removed for clarity.

using System;
using System.IO;
using System.Reflection;
using System.Runtime.InteropServices;

namespace FontUtil
{
    public static class Reader
    {
        public static T Read<T>(BinaryReader reader, bool fileIsLittleEndian = false)
        {
            Type type = typeof(T);
            int size = Marshal.SizeOf(type);
            byte[] buffer = new byte[size];
            reader.Read(buffer, 0, size);
            if (BitConverter.IsLittleEndian != fileIsLittleEndian)
            {
                FieldInfo[] fields = type.GetFields();
                foreach (FieldInfo field in fields)
                {
                    int offset = (int)Marshal.OffsetOf(type, field.Name);
                    int fieldSize = Marshal.SizeOf(field.FieldType);
                    for (int b = offset, t = fieldSize + b - 1; b < t; ++b, --t)
                    {
                        byte temp = buffer[t];
                        buffer[t] = buffer[b];
                        buffer[b] = temp;
                    }
                }
            }
            GCHandle h = GCHandle.Alloc(buffer, GCHandleType.Pinned);
            T obj = (T)Marshal.PtrToStructure(h.AddrOfPinnedObject(), type);
            h.Free();
            return obj;
        }
    }
}

Structs need to be declared like this (and can't contain arrays, I think, haven't tried that out - the endian swap would probably get confused).

[StructLayout(LayoutKind.Sequential, Pack = 1)]
public struct NameRecord
{
    public UInt16 uPlatformID;
    public UInt16 uEncodingID;
    public UInt16 uLanguageID;
    public UInt16 uNameID;
    public UInt16 uStringLength;
    public UInt16 uStringOffset; //from start of storage area
}
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