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Right now, I'm calling the win32 createcaret/showcaret in the keypress event of my masked textbox. That changes it fine. I want the caret to change when the box is entered, though, either by tab or by click.

Unfortunately the enter event or even the invalidate event aren't suitable places to change that caret. It doesn't change, maybe because they fire too early.

So anyway, how can I get the caret to change on textbox enter without handling it in the enter event?

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1  
The GotFocus event is the unequivocal one. It is hidden in the designer, you can still use it by assigning the event handler in your code. –  Hans Passant Jul 5 '11 at 20:06
    
Thanks Hans, that works great. May I ask you what event I should call destroycaret on? I'm using leave right now, not sure if it's correct. –  Isaac Bolinger Jul 5 '11 at 20:15
1  
LostFocus should be okay. –  Hans Passant Jul 5 '11 at 20:18

1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

You need to add DestroyCaret to your routine, too:

private void Form1_Load(object sender, EventArgs e)
{
  textBox1.GotFocus += new EventHandler(textBox1_GotFocus);
  textBox1.LostFocus += new EventHandler(textBox1_LostFocus);
}

private void textBox1_GotFocus(object sender, EventArgs e)
{
  CreateCaret(textBox1.Handle, IntPtr.Zero, 6, textBox1.Height);
  ShowCaret(textBox1.Handle);
}

private void textBox1_LostFocus(object sender, EventArgs e)
{
  DestroyCaret();
}
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I got some kind of stack corruption error today. Could that be because of undestroyed carets? –  Isaac Bolinger Jul 5 '11 at 20:17
    
Might be tough to fathom, but I just use .net and assume I don't have to worry about memory problems. I've practically no win32 experience at all. –  Isaac Bolinger Jul 5 '11 at 20:22
    
@IsaacB Oh, bad assumption, because when you start using API calls, you are venturing into unmanaged code, which means it's your job to manage those resources. –  LarsTech Jul 5 '11 at 20:24

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