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I have the following code in some methods of my Data Layer:

StringBuilder sb = new StringBuilder();
SqlCommand s = new SqlCommand(sb.ToString(), conn);
try 
{ 
    SqlDataReader dr = s.ExecuteReader(); 
    while(dr.Read())
      DoSomething(dr);
}
catch (Exception ex)
{ 
    sb.Append(Util.ExceptionRecursive(ex)); 
}

The thing is, dr never closes in case of exception. And when other method tries to access another data reader, it throws another exception that says something like "Another Datareader is connected to the Database"

I want to close my DataReader in any case. But this:

sb = new StringBuilder();
SqlCommand s = new SqlCommand(sb.ToString(), conn);
SqlDataReader dr;
try 
{
    dr = s.ExecuteReader(); 
    while(dr.Read())
      DoSomething(dr);
}
catch (Exception ex)
{ 
    sb.Append(Util.ExceptionRecursive(ex)); 
}
finally
{
    dr.Close();
}

Won't work because in case of exception dr may have no data, and won't compile.

How should I do it then?

share|improve this question
    
You should use a ConnectionStringBuilder EDIT: (if you're building a connection string) –  SLaks Jul 5 '11 at 20:17
    
@SLaks, for what? the SQL? –  Lasse V. Karlsen Jul 5 '11 at 20:19
1  
@Lasse: For the connection string. (I thought he was creating a SqlConnection too) –  SLaks Jul 5 '11 at 20:20
    
You should probably be using parameters –  SLaks Jul 5 '11 at 20:21
    
conn is a SqlConnection, already made. –  apacay Jul 5 '11 at 20:33

3 Answers 3

up vote 6 down vote accepted

You should use the using statement:
It generates a finally block to ensure that your resource is always disposed.

StringBuilder sb = new StringBuilder();
using (SqlCommand s = new SqlCommand(sb.ToString(), conn)) {
    try 
    { 

        using (SqlDataReader dr = s.ExecuteReader()) {
            while(dr.Read())
              DoSomething(dr);
        }

    }
    catch (Exception ex)
    { 
        sb.Append(Util.ExceptionRecursive(ex)); 
    }    
}
share|improve this answer
    
@SLaks this should work then on 1.1... isn't it? –  apacay Jul 5 '11 at 20:30
    
@apa: Yes; using statements have existed since C# was first created. –  SLaks Jul 5 '11 at 20:33
    
what internally would the using do? Dispose or Close? If it's Dispose, will it "remember" to Close the DataReader? –  apacay Jul 5 '11 at 20:35
1  
@apacay: Dispose() calls Close(). You should use a separate using statement per object. –  SLaks Jul 5 '11 at 20:44

The best way is probably this:

sb = new StringBuilder();
...
using (SqlCommand s = new SqlCommand(sb.ToString(), conn))
using (SqlDataReader dr = s.ExecuteReader())
{
    try
    {
        while(dr.Read())
          DoSomething(dr);
    }
    catch (Exception ex)
    { 
        sb.Append(Util.ExceptionRecursive(ex)); 
    }
}

However, if you're expecting (or not) exceptions during SQL execution, you must place the exception handling code outside:

sb = new StringBuilder();
...
try
{
    using (SqlCommand s = new SqlCommand(sb.ToString(), conn))
    using (SqlDataReader dr = s.ExecuteReader())
    {
        while(dr.Read())
          DoSomething(dr);
    }
}
catch (Exception ex)
{ 
    sb.Append(Util.ExceptionRecursive(ex)); 
}
share|improve this answer
    
But it all depends on where you expect exceptions. –  Lasse V. Karlsen Jul 5 '11 at 20:17
    
Exceptions generally come from ExecuteReader, not Read. –  SLaks Jul 5 '11 at 20:18
    
They could come from DoSomething, but I agree, edited the answer –  Lasse V. Karlsen Jul 5 '11 at 20:18
    
@Lasse my problem comes from the ExecuteReader... DoSomething(SqlDataReader dr) shouldn't cause any trouble. –  apacay Jul 5 '11 at 20:30

you can write it as:

if(dr!=null) dr.Close();
share|improve this answer
    
I thought of that but it seemed unclean clean to me. –  apacay Jul 5 '11 at 20:31

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