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More specifically:

  • When do you need to prefix the scope with :: (like ::Foo::Bar)
  • When is directly referring to a scoped const ok? (just Foo::Bar)
  • Is there a good reason why this behavior is so confusing?

EDIT: I am talking about stuff like this

module Foo
  THING = 'thing'
  module Bar
    puts THING
  end
end
#=> thing

module Foo::Bar
  puts THING
end
#=> NameError: uninitialized constant Foo::Bar::THING
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2 Answers 2

up vote 5 down vote accepted

When do you need to prefix the scope with :: (like ::Foo::Bar)

When there's another constant with the same name in the current namespace.

When is directly referring to a scoped const ok? (just Foo::Bar)

When there isn't another constant with the same name in the current namespace. Ie. when that identifier is unambiguous. Similarly, you could just use Bar to aid readability if it was unambiguous.

Is there a good reason why this behavior is so confusing?

It's balancing readability and ease of use against specificity. You don't always want to have to do ::Foo::Bar::Baz::Boo (the globally unique identifier) when you're deep down in your namespace.

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was a bit more clear about the oddness I'm talking about –  Matt Briggs Jul 5 '11 at 22:05
    
Your second example only brings the Foo::Bar namespace into scope. OTOH, when you open each namespace explicitly--as in your first example--both Foo and Foo::Bar are brought into scope. –  Ian Jul 5 '11 at 22:19
    
That is pretty odd, but would explain it. I assumed it would search in all modules leading up to the class in either syntax. do you know of any other differences between the two syntaxes? –  Matt Briggs Jul 5 '11 at 23:21
    
I think I understand it's not necessary to prefix if those constants are unique throughout my whole Rails App… Does this mean if so I don't need to prefix at all? Does it mean ALL modules/classes will be "scanned"? –  StuFF mc Oct 24 '12 at 8:45
    
It just scans the current namespace. You're only ever in the global namespace unless you've "opened" a namespace using the module keyword. So, if the top of your file says class Foo::Bar (where Foo is a module) your class definition will be in the global/root namespace. But, if you say module Foo; class Bar; your class definition will be in the Foo namespace and you can reference Foo::Baz with simply Baz. –  Ian Oct 24 '12 at 15:43

In as far as I've understood/experienced it: when in a module/class Foo, then Bar refers to Foo::Bar unless it doesn't exist -- in which case it means ::Bar.)

Please take it with a grain of salt, though, because I'm new to ruby as well. :-P

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