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I need to extract an entire javascript function from a script file. I know the name of the function, but I don't know what the contents of the function may be. This function may be embedded within any number of closures.

I need to have two output values:

  1. The entire body of the named function that I'm finding in the input script.
  2. The full input script with the found named function removed.

So, assume I'm looking for the findMe function in this input script:

function() {
  function something(x,y) {
    if (x == true) {
      console.log ("Something says X is true");
      // The regex should not find this:
      console.log ("function findMe(z) { var a; }");
    }
  }
  function findMe(z) {
    if (z == true) {
      console.log ("Something says Z is true");
    }
  }
  findMe(true);
  something(false,"hello");
}();

From this, I need the following two result values:

  1. The extracted findMe script

    function findMe(z) {
      if (z == true) {
        console.log ("Something says Z is true");
      }
    }
    
  2. The input script with the findMe function removed

    function() {
      function something(x,y) {
        if (x == true) {
          console.log ("Something says X is true");
          // The regex should not find this:
          console.log ("function findMe(z) { var a; }");
        }
      }
      findMe(true);
      something(false,"hello");
    }();
    

The problems I'm dealing with:

  1. The body of the script to find could have any valid javascript code within it. The code or regex to find this script must be able to ignore values in strings, multiple nested block levels, and so forth.

  2. If the function definition to find is specified inside of a string, it should be ignored.

Any advice on how to accomplish something like this?

Update:

It looks like regex is not the right way to do this. I'm open to pointers to parsers that could help me accomplish this. I'm looking at Jison, but would love to hear about anything else.

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1  
You need to have it done with javascript or you can use some other language (eg. python)? –  Matteo Ceccarello Jul 5 '11 at 21:23
    
I'm parsing javascript files on the server, but I'm doing it in node.js. So it would be best for it to be javascript doing it. I'm looking at Jison right now as a possible solution: zaach.github.com/jison –  Tauren Jul 5 '11 at 21:34
    
I've just updated the question to not be regex specific. Basically, I'm looking for a solution to the problem, whether the solution invovles regex or not doesn't matter. –  Tauren Jul 5 '11 at 21:40
    
perhaps you should try to look for the function name using regular expressions, then use a stack to select the function body: you parse the file from where you found the function name, pushing a "{" (or anything else) in the stack when you find one, and popping a symbol from the stack when you find a "}". When the stack gets empty, you have reached the end of the function body, and you are done. It surely isn't efficient nor extremely elegant, but it may be a solution. –  Matteo Ceccarello Jul 5 '11 at 21:56
    
It'll break on any string declaration with an opening or closing bracket that isn't handled. Or comment. Or anything that lets you not close a bracket and remain valid. I don't think there are simple solutions, just gotta buckle down and write a (simple) parser. –  Peter Chang Jul 5 '11 at 22:50

4 Answers 4

If the script is included in your page (something you weren't clear about) and the function is publicly accessible, then you can just get the source to the function with:

functionXX.toString();

https://developer.mozilla.org/en/JavaScript/Reference/Global_Objects/Function/toString

Other ideas:

1) Look at the open source code that does either JS minification or JS pretty indent. In both cases, those pieces of code have to "understand" the JS language in order to do their work in a fault tolerant way. I doubt it's going to be pure regex as the language is just a bit more complicated than that.

2) If you control the source at the server and are wanted to modify a particular function in it, then just insert some new JS that replaces that function at runtime with your own function. That way, you let the JS compiler identify the function for you and you just replace it with your own version.

3) For regex, here's what I've done which is not foolproof, but worked for me for some build tools I use:

I run multiple passes (using regex in python):

  1. Remove all comments delineated with /* and */.
  2. Remove all quoted strings
  3. Now, all that's left is non-string, non-comment javascript so you should be able to regex directly on your function declaration
  4. If you need the function source with strings and comments back in, you'll have to reconstitute that from the original, now that you know the begin end of the function

Here are the regexes I use (expressed in python's multi-line format):

reStr = r"""
    (                               # capture the non-comment portion
        "(?:\\.|[^"\\])*"           # capture double quoted strings
        |
        '(?:\\.|[^'\\])*'           # capture single quoted strings
        |
        (?:[^/\n"']|/[^/*\n"'])+    # any code besides newlines or string literals
        |
        \n                          # newline
    )
    |
    (/\*  (?:[^*]|\*[^/])*   \*/)       # /* comment */
    |
    (?://(.*)$)                     # // single line comment
    $"""    

reMultiStart = r"""         # start of a multiline comment that doesn't terminate on this line
    (
        /\*                 # /* 
        (
            [^\*]           # any character that is not a *
            |               # or
            \*[^/]          # * followed by something that is not a /
        )*                  # any number of these
    )
    $"""

reMultiEnd = r"""           # end of a multiline comment that didn't start on this line
    (
        ^                   # start of the line
        (
            [^\*]           # any character that is not a *
            |               # or
            \*+[^/]         # * followed by something that is not a /
        )*                  # any number of these
        \*/                 # followed by a */
    )
"""

regExSingleKeep = re.compile("// /")                    # lines that have single lines comments that start with "// /" are single line comments we should keep
regExMain = re.compile(reStr, re.VERBOSE)
regExMultiStart = re.compile(reMultiStart, re.VERBOSE)
regExMultiEnd = re.compile(reMultiEnd, re.VERBOSE)

This all sounds messy to me. You might be better off explaining what problem you're really trying to solve so folks can help find a more elegant solution to the real problem.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks, I am aware of this. But in this case, this is being done on the server and I'm just processing plain text. I don't have the javascript included in a page. –  Tauren Jul 5 '11 at 21:36
    
OK, I added more options to my answer. –  jfriend00 Jul 5 '11 at 21:56
    
@jfriend00, I don't see that regex handle JS regex quoting anywhere. ;-) –  Qtax Jul 5 '11 at 22:40
    
Also, your comments will break on /* foo **/. –  Qtax Jul 5 '11 at 22:42
1  
+1 Good idea to look at existing minifiers and other code parsing tools. I also suggest looking at JSLint. –  davin Jul 5 '11 at 23:10

A regex can't do this. What you need is a tool that parses JavaScript in a compiler-accurate way, builds up a structure representing the shape of the JavaScript code, enables you to find the function you want and print it out, and enables you to remove the function definition from that structure and regenerate the remaining javascript text.

Our DMS Software Reengineering Toolkit can do this, using its JavaScript front end. DMS provides general parsing, abstract syntax tree building/navigating/manipulation, and prettyprinting of (valid!) source text from a modified AST. The JavaScript front end provides DMS with compiler-accurate definition of JavaScript. You can point DMS/JavaScript at a JavaScript file (or even various kinds of dynamic HTML with embedded script tags containing JavaScript), have it produce the AST. A DMS pattern can be used to find your function:

  pattern find_my_function(r:type,a: arguments, b:body): declaration
     " \r my_function_name(\a) { \b } ";

DMS can search the AST for a matching tree with the specified structure; because this is an AST match and not a string match, line breaks, whitespace, comments and other trivial differences won't fool it. [What you didn't say is what to if you have more than one function in different scopes: which one do you want?]

Having found the match, you can ask DMS to print just that matched code which acts as your extraction step. You can also ask DMS to remove the function using a rewrite rule:

  rule remove_my_function((r:type,a: arguments, b:body): declaration->declaration
     " \r my_function_name(\a) { \b } " -> ";";

and then prettyprint the resulting AST. DMS will preserve all the comments properly.

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Oh Ira, you jokester. –  bukzor Jun 6 '12 at 23:30

I am almost afraid that regex cannot do this job. I think it is the same as trying to parse XML or HTML with regex, a topic that has already caused various religious debates on this forum.

EDIT: Please correct me if this is NOT the same as trying to parse XML.

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Though this doesn't answer the question, I give it +1 since this would be an abuse of regular expressions. Regular expressions are never meant to parse input that is recursive by nature (a programming language); –  Juan Mendes Jul 5 '11 at 21:28
    
That's what I was afraid of too. I'm looking into Jison to see if it would help. zaach.github.com/jison –  Tauren Jul 5 '11 at 21:35
    
NP-complete, huh? What does that have to do with anything? Javascript syntax is a context free grammar, as are most languages. Parsing is very much a deterministic polynomial time operation. In addition, your reduction to generic parsing is incorrect (it's doesn't constitute a valid iff since it's unidirectional). While being able to parse would solve this problem, this is a subproblem of the parsing problem, and potentially easier, even potentially solvable by a regular expression. –  davin Jul 5 '11 at 22:49
    
@davin You stated that JS syntax is a context free grammar (hence ir can be represented/written by/validated by a pushdown automaton). Regular expressions are regular and hence are equivalent to finite state automata. A finite state automaton cannot process a context free grammar. –  Hyperboreus Jul 6 '11 at 13:32
    
@davin About parsing non regular input with regular expressions, confer: stackoverflow.com/questions/1732348/… –  Hyperboreus Jul 6 '11 at 13:37

I guess you would have to use and construct a String-Tokenizer for this job.

function tokenizer(str){
  var stack = array(); // stack of opening-tokens
  var last = ""; // last opening-token

  // token pairs: subblocks, strings, regex
  var matches = {
    "}":"{",
    "'":"'",
    '"':'"',
    "/":"/"
  };

  // start with function declaration
  var needle = str.match(/function[ ]+findme\([^\)]*\)[^\{]*\{/);

  // move everything before needle to result
  var result += str.slice(0,str.indexOf(needle));
  // everithing after needle goes to the stream that will be parsed
  var stream = str.slice(str.indexOf(needle)+needle.length);

  // init stack
  stack.push("{");
  last = "{";

  // while still in this function
  while(stack.length > 0){

    // determine next token
    needle = stream.match(/(?:\{|\}|"|'|\/|\\)/); 

    if(needle == "\\"){
      // if this is an escape character => remove escaped character
      stream = stream.slice(stream.indexOf(needle)+2);
      continue;

    }else if(last == matches[needle]){
      // if this ends something pop stack and set last
      stack.pop();
      last = stack[stack.length-1];

    }else if(last == "{"){  
      // if we are not inside a string (last either " or ' or /)
      // push needle to stack
      stack.push(needle);
      last = needle;
    }

    // cut away including token
    stream = stream.slice(stream.indexOf(needle)+1);
  }

  return result + stream;
}

oh, I forgot tokens for comments... but i guess you got an idea now of how it works...

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