Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have two questions related to C++:

In many textbooks, the keyword this is a pointer to the calling object. Correct?

As i like to play with coding, i wrote the following simple code:

struct Base
{
    void g();
    virtual void f();
};

void Base::f() {
    cout << "Base::f()" << endl;
}

void Base::g() {
    cout << "Base::g()" << endl;
    cout << "sizeof(*this) : " << sizeof(*this) << endl;
    this->f();
}

struct Derived : public Base
{
    int d;
    void f();
};

void Derived::f()
{
    cout << "Derived::f()" << endl;
}

int main()
{
    Base a;
    Derived b;

    cout << "sizeof(a) : " << sizeof(a) << endl;
    cout << "sizeof(b) : " << sizeof(b) << endl;

    a.g();
    b.g();
}

The above code produces the following output:

sizeof(a) : 4
sizeof(b) : 8
Base::g()
sizeof(*this) : 4
Base::f()
Base::g()
sizeof(*this) : 4   // why 4 bytes not 8 bytes?????????
Derived::f()

If this is pointing to the calling object, should the second line of sizeof(*this) print 8 instead of 4 since the calling object is b? What actually is happening here? Is this has been demoted?!!!!

If this has been demoted to type Base, how this->f() invokes the correct function? I am really confused.

share|improve this question
    
Try adding a call to sizeof(*this) in Derived::f(). See what that puts out. The call in Base::g() doesn't know that it's part of a subclass. In that case, *this legitimately references Base, not Derived. –  Daniel Bingham Jul 5 '11 at 22:01
    
and how do you expect sizeof(*this) be evaluated at compile-time? It's no different than sizeof(Base). –  Gene Bushuyev Jul 5 '11 at 22:11

4 Answers 4

up vote 12 down vote accepted
void Base::g() {
    cout << "Base::g()" << endl;
    cout << "sizeof(*this) : " << sizeof(*this) << endl;
    this->f();
}

The important distinction that needs to be made is that sizeof is a compile-time operator, not a runtime operator. The compiler interprets the expression sizeof(*this) as "the size of the object pointed to by this", which, in the scope of Base::g would be an object of type Base. The compiler will essentially rewrite that statement as this, because it knows that the size of Base is four bytes:

cout << "sizeof(*this) : " << 4 << endl;
share|improve this answer
    
Oh, you are right. I modified the code to print the value of this instead of sizeof(*this) and i compare it with &b and &a. The answer matched my expectation. Umhhh.. Thanksssssssssss. –  Eto700 Jul 5 '11 at 22:21

Base can't see/access/know about anything that's part of derived objects, so sizeof only reports the part of the object that is visible to it. More to the point, sizeof in a method of Base can't know that there are or will be subclasses (you can subclass Base without recompiling it, after all) so it can't report on anything but the part it knows about. (sizeof is computed at compile time, not run time.)

share|improve this answer

The correct function f is called because Base::f is virtual. This tells the compiler that when a call to Base*->f() is requested, the actual address of the callee is looked up in the vtable of the actual object whose member you invoke.

The type of the this in question is Base*, which is why sizeof(*this) == sizeof(Base), but its vtable belongs to a derived object and hence the function call to f goes to the override.

share|improve this answer

this is a constant value pointer to the object that the function is a non-static member of. Which means that, for this to be a viable value, it must be used only in non-static members of a class. Remember: you must use an object instance to call a non-static member function (instance.function or instance->function); this is a pointer to "instance".

The reason the size is never the 8 that you expect is because g is a member of the class Base. For g, this is of type Base *const, and therefore *this is of type Base&. The sizeof(Base) is 4. Even if it were a virtual member, this would not change; the type for that implementation of g would always be Base *const. Virtually overridden versions would have different types, but only the type of the class that implements them.

this's type does not follow polymorphism; it has exactly and only the type that the function was defined with.

share|improve this answer
    
Even if g were virtual it wouldn't matter because g is never overridden by the derived class, non? –  Kerrek SB Jul 5 '11 at 22:03
1  
Just to clarify: Even if g was virtual, sizeof(*this) would always be be 4 in Base::g() regardless of whterh it was called via a derived type (for example if the virtual g() wasn't overridden). I know that this is what you say in your last sentence, but the second paragraph might leave readers thinking that sizeof(*this) would 'follow' the derived type even in the base implementation of g(). –  Michael Burr Jul 5 '11 at 22:09

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.