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How can I instantiate the type T inside my InstantiateType<T> method below?

I'm getting the error: 'T' is a 'type parameter' but is used like a 'variable'.:

(SCROLL DOWN FOR REFACTORED ANSWER)

using System;
using System.Collections.Generic;
using System.Linq;
using System.Text;

namespace TestGeneric33
{
    class Program
    {
        static void Main(string[] args)
        {
            Container container = new Container();
            Console.WriteLine(container.InstantiateType<Customer>("Jim", "Smith"));
            Console.WriteLine(container.InstantiateType<Employee>("Joe", "Thompson"));
            Console.ReadLine();
        }
    }

    public class Container
    {
        public T InstantiateType<T>(string firstName, string lastName) where T : IPerson
        {
            T obj = T();
            obj.FirstName(firstName);
            obj.LastName(lastName);
            return obj;
        }

    }

    public interface IPerson
    {
        string FirstName { get; set; }
        string LastName { get; set; }
    }

    public class Customer : IPerson
    {
        public string FirstName { get; set; }
        public string LastName { get; set; }
        public string Company { get; set; }
    }

    public class Employee : IPerson
    {
        public string FirstName { get; set; }
        public string LastName { get; set; }
        public int EmployeeNumber { get; set; }
    }
}

REFACTORED ANSWER:

Thanks for all the comments, they got me on the right track, this is what I wanted to do:

using System;

namespace TestGeneric33
{
    class Program
    {
        static void Main(string[] args)
        {
            Container container = new Container();
            Customer customer1 = container.InstantiateType<Customer>("Jim", "Smith");
            Employee employee1 = container.InstantiateType<Employee>("Joe", "Thompson");
            Console.WriteLine(PersonDisplayer.SimpleDisplay(customer1));
            Console.WriteLine(PersonDisplayer.SimpleDisplay(employee1));
            Console.ReadLine();
        }
    }

    public class Container
    {
        public T InstantiateType<T>(string firstName, string lastName) where T : IPerson, new()
        {
            T obj = new T();
            obj.FirstName = firstName;
            obj.LastName = lastName;
            return obj;
        }
    }

    public interface IPerson
    {
        string FirstName { get; set; }
        string LastName { get; set; }
    }

    public class PersonDisplayer
    {
        private IPerson _person;

        public PersonDisplayer(IPerson person)
        {
            _person = person;
        }

        public string SimpleDisplay()
        {
            return String.Format("{1}, {0}", _person.FirstName, _person.LastName);
        }

        public static string SimpleDisplay(IPerson person)
        {
            PersonDisplayer personDisplayer = new PersonDisplayer(person);
            return personDisplayer.SimpleDisplay();
        }
    }

    public class Customer : IPerson
    {
        public string FirstName { get; set; }
        public string LastName { get; set; }
        public string Company { get; set; }
    }

    public class Employee : IPerson
    {
        public string FirstName { get; set; }
        public string LastName { get; set; }
        public int EmployeeNumber { get; set; }
    }
}
share|improve this question
    
+1 for shifting to a better design pattern. –  Joel Coehoorn Mar 18 '09 at 17:17
    
+1 for extremely neatly typed code, a rarity. –  nawfal Apr 25 '13 at 3:33

7 Answers 7

up vote 42 down vote accepted

Declare your method like this:

public string InstantiateType<T>(string firstName, string lastName) where T : IPerson, new()

Notice the additional constraint at the end. Then create a new instance in the method body:

T obj = new T();
share|improve this answer
    
thank's, i was starting to have a headache about that !!! –  eka808 Apr 8 '12 at 10:11

You can also use reflection to fetch the object's constructor and instantiate that way:

var c = typeof(T).GetConstructor();
T t = (T)c.Invoke();
share|improve this answer

Instead of creating a function to Instantiate the type

public T InstantiateType<T>(string firstName, string lastName) where T : IPerson, new()
    {
        T obj = new T();
        obj.FirstName = firstName;
        obj.LastName = lastName;
        return obj;
    }

you could have done it like this

T obj = new T { FirstName = firstName, LastName = lastname };
share|improve this answer
1  
This does not answer the question being asked. The real problem here was that he needed to create a new instance of the generic class. Perhaps it was unintended, but it seems like you are saying that using an initializer would solve the original problem, but it does not. The new() constraint is still needed on the generic type for your answer to work. –  User Dec 26 '13 at 15:26
    
If you are trying to be helpful and suggest that the initializer is a useful tool here, then you should post that as a comment, not another answer. –  User Dec 26 '13 at 15:32

A bit old but for others looking for a solution, perhaps this could be of interest: http://daniel.wertheim.se/2011/12/29/c-generic-factory-with-support-for-private-constructors/

Two solutions. One using Activator and one using Compiled Lambdas.

//Person has private ctor
var person = Factory<Person>.Create(p => p.Name = "Daniel");

public static class Factory<T> where T : class 
{
    private static readonly Func<T> FactoryFn;

    static Factory()
    {
        //FactoryFn = CreateUsingActivator();

        FactoryFn = CreateUsingLambdas();
    }

    private static Func<T> CreateUsingActivator()
    {
        var type = typeof(T);

        Func<T> f = () => Activator.CreateInstance(type, true) as T;

        return f;
    }

    private static Func<T> CreateUsingLambdas()
    {
        var type = typeof(T);

        var ctor = type.GetConstructor(
            BindingFlags.Instance | BindingFlags.CreateInstance |
            BindingFlags.NonPublic,
            null, new Type[] { }, null);

        var ctorExpression = Expression.New(ctor);
        return Expression.Lambda<Func<T>>(ctorExpression).Compile();
    }

    public static T Create(Action<T> init)
    {
        var instance = FactoryFn();

        init(instance);

        return instance;
    }
}
share|improve this answer

Couple of ways.

Without specifying the type must have a constructor:

T obj = default(T); //which will produce null for reference types

With a constructor:

T obj = new T();

But this requires the clause:

where T : new()
share|improve this answer
1  
The first one will assign null rather than create an instance for reference types. –  Joel Coehoorn Mar 18 '09 at 16:27
1  
Yep. You need to use reflection to create types without a default constructor, default(T) is null for all reference types. –  Dan C. Mar 18 '09 at 16:31
    
Yep absolutely, included for completeness really. –  annakata Mar 18 '09 at 16:58

To extend on the answers above, adding where T:new() constraint to a generic method will require T to have a public, parameterless constructor.

If you want to avoid that - and in a factory pattern you sometimes force the others to go through your factory method and not directly through the constructor - then the alternative is to use reflection (Activator.CreateInstance...) and keep the default constructor private. But this comes with a performance penalty, of course.

share|improve this answer
    
May I ask what's the downvote for? –  Dan C. Mar 18 '09 at 16:32
1  
I gave you a compensating +1. Very wierd voting patterns... –  Ruben Bartelink Mar 18 '09 at 16:34
    
It's not the first time people downvote "all other answers" :) –  Dan C. Mar 18 '09 at 16:36
    
I'll admit to sometimes scurrilously not upvoting 'competing' answers until the dusgt has settled on a question :D I guess (non-points) karma will sort them out! –  Ruben Bartelink Mar 18 '09 at 16:42

you want new T(), but you'll also need to add , new() to the where spec for the factory method

share|improve this answer
    
whats with the -1? same answer as Joel, 100% fact, but posted before... wierd... –  Ruben Bartelink Mar 18 '09 at 16:32
    
Obviously Joel's answer is clearer, but that doesn't make it -1 territory... –  Ruben Bartelink Mar 18 '09 at 16:33
    
i bumped it back up, I understood it, helped, it seems in general people like posted code better than descriptions here –  Edward Tanguay Mar 18 '09 at 16:34
    
Thanks, the world makes sense again! –  Ruben Bartelink Mar 18 '09 at 16:36

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