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Sorry for the ambiguous title. I'm kind of new to programming and this issue is a bit weird so I didn't know how to word it.

I'm simply practicing on creating an array populated with colors and the user just have to pick a color by picking 1-9. The issue is that I get an error message:

Use of unassigned local variable 'UserPickNum'

I already assigned it to an int and the only solution that will fix this if I created another construct, runs Console.WriteLine(colors[UserPickNum]); picks the color, then the program runs fine.

I guess my question is, why won't it work like this without having to create and call for another construct.

using System;
using System.Collections.Generic;
using System.Text;

class Program
{
    static void Main()
    {
        string[] colors;
        string Pick;
        int PickNum;
        int UserPickNum;

        Console.WriteLine("Which color do you want? Pick 1-9");
        Pick = Console.ReadLine();
        if (int.TryParse(Pick, out PickNum))
        {
            UserPickNum = Convert.ToInt32(Pick);
        }
        else
        {
            Console.WriteLine("This isn't a valid number");
            Console.ReadKey();
            Main();
        }

        colors = new string[10] { "black", "white", "green", "purple", "red", "brown", "blue", "gray", "yellow", "indigo" };
        Console.WriteLine(colors[UserPickNum]);
       Main(); 
    }
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Thanks everyone! I really appreciate the feedback and answers. This is really all new to me so seeing these exception messages and learning how to resolve it really helps me learn. –  nhat Jul 5 '11 at 23:31

4 Answers 4

If Pick turns out not to be a number and thus int.TryParse returns false, then UserPickNum will not be assigned to a value. Probably the easiest way to resolve this is to assign a value to UserPickNum where you declare it, i.e.:

int UserPickNum = Int32.MinValue;
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Your code only has one route through the if statement where you set UserPickNum - hence the warning. However, you don't need to call Convert.ToInt32 on Pick as you already have the number as an integer - in PickNum - assuming that the user entered a valid integer. This means you don't need UserPickNum at all. So you could change your code to be:

if (!int.TryParse(Pick, out PickNum))
{
    Console.WriteLine("This isn't a valid number");
    Console.ReadKey();
    Main();
}

colors = new string[10] { "black", "white", "green", "purple", "red", "brown", "blue", "gray", "yellow", "indigo" };
Console.WriteLine(colors[PickNum]);
Main(); 

You should also check that it's in range before trying to use it as an array index:

if (PickNum < 0 || PickNum > 9)
{
    Console.WriteLine("Input out of range");
    // Try again
}
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out parameters don't require the variable to be pre-initialized. ref parameters do. –  Kyle Trauberman Jul 5 '11 at 22:39
    
@Kyle - of course - I misread the code. Answer updated. –  ChrisF Jul 5 '11 at 22:40

That error means that you are trying to use a variable that hasn't had a value given to it yet. You say "I already assigned it to an int", but that's not really an assignment. The assignment is when you give it a value (e.g. int UserPickNum = 0).

In your code it looks you're attempting to make sure the value is assigned with your if/else statement, but the else clause doesn't actually stop the rest of the code after it from executing. You would need to return after you recursively call Main().

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The error message you are getting is because your variable UserPickNum isn't initialized (It isn't set in your else block, and thus there is potentially a path through your code where it isn't set to a value).

You can set it to a default value when you declare it to fix this problem:

int UserPickNum = 0;

Other Feedback

Something else I noticed is that you don't even need the UserPickNum variable. In this part of your code:

Pick = Console.ReadLine();
if (int.TryParse(Pick, out PickNum))
{
    UserPickNum = Convert.ToInt32(Pick);
} 

the Variable PickNum contains the value that the user typed in as an integer. You can streamline this part of the code like this:

Pick = Console.ReadLine();
if (!int.TryParse(Pick, out PickNum))
{
    // code you are currently doing in your else block
    Console.WriteLine("This isn't a valid number");
    Console.ReadKey();
    Main();
} 

// code you are currently doing after your if else block
colors = new string[10] { "black", "white", "green", "purple", "red", "brown", "blue", "gray", "yellow", "indigo" };
Console.WriteLine(colors[PickNum]);
Main(); 
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