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I use typed DataSets for accessing data, configuring them via DataSet Designer (the general idea is explained in this tutorial).

For each table a GetData() method is automatically created at first. It returns a DataTable having the same schema (i.e. columns) as the underlying table in the database. If now I create a custom method using 'Add quiery' option, which is supposed to return only part of data (say three columns out of six), the DataTable returned by the autogenerated method still consists of six columns, while three of them include no data.

This has an annoying side effect that when I bind this DataTable for example to the GridView (apparently using ObjectDataSource), these empty columns appear in the GridView as well, so I have to remove them manually.

Another related problem is that if I add to the corresponding SQL-query columns with data from another table (e.g. using inner joins or sub-queries), these columns on the contrary are not being added to the GridView, though I can bind them manually in the Boundfield.

So if anybody is present here who had not completely moved to the Entity Framework and can explain this behavior and help to overcome these issues, I would highly appreciate your answer. Thank you in advance.

UPDATE: My expectation is to find the way to get a DataTable from the get method created by the DataSet Designer ontop of my SQL-quiery, which would reflect the results of this quiery in its schema. In the tutorial they say that GetData() method creates and fills the DataTable for you and returns it as the method's return value. So intuitively why not create a new table with the matching fields.

So I was hoping I was doing something wrong. Or my expectations were wrong, but then somebody could explain me, why.

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Are you using C# or VB.Net? –  Smudge202 Jul 6 '11 at 9:37
    
@Smudge202: I'm using C# –  Kirill Jul 6 '11 at 9:44

2 Answers 2

I haven't tried this, but I imagine you can resolve these issues by transferring your data table results into another known type, and binding the grid accordingly. (I know that makes little sense, bear with me...)

As an example (albeit with an untyped dataset):

EDIT - swapped to C# for you:

EDIT2 - wow, online converter failed me massively - retyped so it'll actually compile now

using System;
using System.Collections.Generic;
using System.Linq;
using System.Text;
using System.Data;

public class myView 
{ 
    public string OrderNumber { get; set; } 
    public int Quantity { get; set; } 
    public decimal PricePerUnit { get; set; } 
    public decimal TotalPrice { get; set; } 
}

public void SO9(System.Data.DataTable mockTypedDatatable)
{
    IEnumerable<myView> results = mockTypedDatatable.AsEnumerable().Select(n => new myView {    
                OrderNumber = Convert.ToString(n["OrderNumber"]),    
                Quantity = Convert.ToInt32(n["Quantity"]),    
                PricePerUnit = Convert.ToDecimal(n["Price"])});
    results.ToList().ForEach(x => x.TotalPrice = x.Quantity * x.PricePerUnit);
    myGridView.DataSource = results;      
    myGridView.DataBind();
}

In the example I assigned columns from the pretend datatable to some properties, whilst other properties are populated by other means (in the example, a simply multiplication of Quanty * Price but you can extend this easily).

Hope that helps

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Thank you for your answer. It is a possible option to go, but unfortunately that's not exactly what I'm looking for. Actually that is more a workaround than a real solution. Thanks again for your time and c# :) –  Kirill Jul 6 '11 at 10:12
    
@Kirill no problem and sorry it doesn't help. So, you are looking for the GridView to receive a Typed Dataset, ignore nulled columns, and include additional columns specified in SQL? If so, wouldn't it be best to work with un-typed DataTables? That way the null columns wouldn't exist and therefore would appear in the grid, and the gridview would be able to resolve correctly the contents/columns of the table based on the fields you select in SQL. –  Smudge202 Jul 6 '11 at 10:18
    
Well, my intention was a bit different. My expectation was to find the way to get a DataTable from the get method created by the DataSet Designer ontop of my SQL-quiery, which would reflect the results of this quiery in its schema. In the tutorial they say that GetData() method creates and fills the DataTable for you and returns it as the methods return value. So intuitevily why not create a new table with the matching fields. –  Kirill Jul 6 '11 at 11:06
    
So I was hoping I was doing something wrong. Or my expectations were wrong, but then somebody could explain me, why. –  Kirill Jul 6 '11 at 11:08
    
I see. Well I don't think you can do it with the typed datasets. To use a normal dataset, consider using a SqlDataAdapter, initialised using a SqlCommand, in turn initialised with a SqlConnection and your T-SQL. Use the SqlDataAdapter.Fill() method to create and Populate a DataSet. You can then enumerate over the resulting DataSets' columns propertie to translate the data to another form if needed, or just bind to it. –  Smudge202 Jul 6 '11 at 11:17
up vote 0 down vote accepted

Ok I can say I've found out how to solve it.

The explanation is that the corresponding TableAdapter creates and returns by any of its GetData() methods (including customized methods like GetReducedSetOfData()) not just a generic DataTable, but exactly typed DataTable (e.g. CarSetsDataTable in my case). Perhaps that was exactly essence of strongly typed DataSets which I had overlooked.

And the solution is easy in my opinion. You've got just not to create new custom methods with probably modified data schema as return value in the existing DataAdapter, but create other DataAdapters for the same db table which would return exactly the result of the other custom SQL-query you need with their default GetData() methods.

I do not know if creating many DataAdapters can have any side effects, but it seems to be a safe way to get exactly those data you need from the typed DataSet with minimal effort.

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