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I am trying to create alternative names for the function call numberedFunction when it has certain values as below

template< typename T >
class X
{
  public:

    X() : single( std::bind( &X::numberedFunction, *this, 1 ) ),
          halfDozen( std::bind( &X::numberedFunction, *this, 6 ) )
    { ... }

    T numberedFunction( unsigned int i ) { ... }

    const std::function< T() >& single;
    const std::function< T() >& halfDozen;
};

But this code is not correct (segfaults when I try to use any of the specially named functions). Is there an issue with using this the way I am in the initialization list (e.g., is this not guarenteed to be well-formed at the time I am accessing it there)? Something else (obvious)? Is there a better way to do what I am trying to do (I feel like there almost definitely is)?

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2  
std::bind( &X, *this, 1 ) and std::bind( &X, *this, 6 ) are nonsensical, but not because of usage of this. What exactly do you want single and halfDozen to do when invoked? –  ildjarn Jul 6 '11 at 1:20
    
Sorry, it should be fixed now. –  bpw1621 Jul 6 '11 at 3:54
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3 Answers

up vote 5 down vote accepted
const std::function< T() >& single;
const std::function< T() >& halfDozen;

Your members are references to const, but you are initializing them from a temporary in the constructor (assuming the bind expressions in your real code aren't nonsensical). As soon as the construction is done they are invalid. Is this really what you intended?


Maybe this is what you want do do (using psychic powers here):

template< typename T >
class X
{
  public:

    X() : single( std::bind( &X::numberedFunction, this, 1 ) ),
          halfDozen( std::bind( &X::numberedFunction, this, 6 ) )
    { ... }

    T numberedFunction( unsigned int i ) { ... }

    const std::function< T() > single;
    const std::function< T() > halfDozen;
};

Notice that I'm binding to this, not *this. This avoids a copy, but may not be what you want.

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Fixed the code I was using. Do I not need the class scope ahead of the member function in this case because it's inside the class? Also can you explain what you mean about binding to this vice *this? The first problem is that bind is returning a new function that is temporary and not a reference to an existing one which makes sense now. –  bpw1621 Jul 6 '11 at 4:01
    
@bpw1621 You're correct regarding the syntax for pointers to members, I have fixed my answer. –  Luc Danton Jul 6 '11 at 4:05
    
Also is sarat correct about his statement concerning using this at all being undefined in the initializer list ? Your answer seems to indicate that shouldn't be a problem. –  bpw1621 Jul 6 '11 at 4:05
    
@bpw1621 Using an object (through this or *this or however else) during construction comes with some caveats but is rarely technically invalid. In this case the object is not even used; this is stored but not dereferenced. –  Luc Danton Jul 6 '11 at 4:07
    
@bpw1621 as a warning though try to understand the differences between bind(&T::member, this), bind(&T::member, ref(*this)) and bind(&T::member, *this). None of them is technically invalid when used in a constructor but depending on what numberedFunction does the last one may be incompatible with your design. –  Luc Danton Jul 6 '11 at 4:15
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An alternative approach is to just add a few forwarding functions:

T numberedFunction( unsigned int i ) { ... }

T single()
{ return numberedFunction(1); }

T halfDozen()
{ return numberedFunction(6); }
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+1 for the "not everything must use all C++0x features" approach. –  Kerrek SB Jul 6 '11 at 9:40
    
I did consider this but I thought it would probably be (slightly) less efficient (because of the extra misdirect). Is it likely that the forwarding function version will produce code that is more or less as efficient (e.g., calls being inlined, unnecessary operations being elided, etc.)? –  bpw1621 Jul 6 '11 at 13:29
1  
@bpw1621 - It is highly likely that a single line function will be inlined and work just like if you had written that line yourself. I would worry more that the std::function objects add to the size of each class object. –  Bo Persson Jul 6 '11 at 13:33
    
@Bo Persson a good point I didn't consider. –  bpw1621 Jul 6 '11 at 13:52
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You're using this pointer in the initialization list. It's an uninitialized object. I wonder whether you could compile this code successfully or not!

See a sample to see the usage of bind (taken from MSDN)

// std_tr1__functional__bind.cpp 
// compile with: /EHsc 
#include <functional> 
#include <algorithm> 
#include <iostream> 

using namespace std::placeholders; 

void square(double x) 
{ 
    std::cout << x << "^2 == " << x * x << std::endl; 
} 

void product(double x, double y) 
{ 
    std::cout << x << "*" << y << " == " << x * y << std::endl; 
} 

int main() 
{ 
    double arg[] = {1, 2, 3}; 

    std::for_each(&arg[0], arg + 3, square); 
    std::cout << std::endl; 

    std::for_each(&arg[0], arg + 3, std::bind(product, _1, 2)); 
    std::cout << std::endl; 

    std::for_each(&arg[0], arg + 3, std::bind(square, _1)); 

    return (0); 
} 
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