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I have a rather complex SQL query I want to use in a here-string in a PowerShell script. Inside the query, I want to replace certain values with PowerShell variables. I'm trying to understand exactly where I need to declare and initialize the variables that will be used in the here-string.

Simplified example:

$SqlQuery = @"
update MyTable 
set foo = $bar
where baz = $quux
"@

...

foreach ($part in $parts) {
    $bar = $part[0]
    $quux = $part[1]

    Run-SqlNonQuery $SqlQuery    #Run-SqlNonQuery is a funct. that executes the query
}

I'm declaring the here-string at the top, and it references a couple of PowerShell variables, $bar and $quux, that change each time thru the loop.

However, I'm getting errors when I run my script. When I run a SQL trace, there's no value where the PowerShell variables appear in the PS script.

Do the PowerShell variables get interpolated when called in a here-string like this? Do I need to put the entire here-string inside the loop where the variables are initialized? What's the right structure for something like this?

I'm running PowerShell on Windows 7, .Net 4, VS2010. I'm not clear on the version; $Host returns

Name             : PowerConsole
Version          : 1.0.30222.0

but $PSVersionTable returns

PSVersion             2.0                                                      
PSCompatibleVersions  {1.0, 2.0}
BuildVersion          6.1.7601.17514
share|improve this question
    
Perhaps you can solve the task even better if Run-SqlNonQuery supports SQL parameters. Does it? –  Roman Kuzmin Jul 6 '11 at 9:45
    
@Roman, no, it doesn't -- I was going down that path and found myself about to write a whole SQL DAL in PS to support stored procs, arbitrary params, etc, and it was a LOT of overhead for not much benefit. The Scripting Way seemed to be to do variable replacement or interpolation, and it was nice and simple, except not giving the results I needed. I now have two solutions to choose from -- one with easy syntax but you have to count placeholders, and one that uses descriptive variable names but a bit more obscure syntax. –  Val Jul 6 '11 at 18:32
    
Alas, then. Mind the issue: if you are going to deal with string data in this way (interpolation of variables), do not forget to escape single quotes with one more (replace ' with ''). –  Roman Kuzmin Jul 6 '11 at 18:52
    
Thanks, good tip about the quotes. In most cases my variables are for text inside the quotes, like set foo = '{0}', but not always! –  Val Jul 6 '11 at 20:34

3 Answers 3

up vote 4 down vote accepted

edited to include Mark's suggestion assumes you match the order of the array in part to the order used with {x} etc..

$SqlQuery = @"
update MyTable 
set foo = {0}
where baz = {1}
"@

...

foreach ($part in $parts) {
    Run-SqlNonQuery $SqlQuery -f $part    #Run-SqlNonQuery is a funct. that executes the query
}

Original version

this should do the job

$SqlQuery = @"
update MyTable 
set foo = {0}
where baz = {1}
"@

...

foreach ($part in $parts) {
    $bar = $part[0]
    $quux = $part[1]

    Run-SqlNonQuery $SqlQuery -f $bar, $quux     #Run-SqlNonQuery is a funct. that executes the query
}

If you want more info Google "powershell string formatting"

HTH, Matt

share|improve this answer
    
PS. PowerShell Version 2 is shipped with Windows 7. –  Matt Jul 6 '11 at 6:21
    
Oh, very cool! I was focused on variable interpolation, didn't think of string formatting -- this works perfectly. Thanks! –  Val Jul 6 '11 at 16:27
1  
The string formatter takes arrays: Run-SqlNonQuery $SqlQuery -f $part would work, too. Saves you creating variables just to pass them on. –  Mark Jul 6 '11 at 20:16
    
@Mark nice addition –  Matt Jul 6 '11 at 22:45

Try this (single quoted here-string):

$SqlQuery = @'
    update MyTable 
    set foo = $bar 
    where baz = $quux
'@

foreach ($part in $parts) 
{
    $bar = $part[0]
    $quux = $part[1] 
    $q = $ExecutionContext.InvokeCommand.ExpandString($SqlQuery)
    Write-Host $q
    #Run-SqlNonQuery $q
}

Generally you need you declare the here-string after you assign the variables (inside the loop). You can use a sub-expression to expand the values (e.g $(...)):

foreach ($part in $parts) {

$SqlQuery = @"
    update MyTable 
    set foo = $bar 
    where baz = $quux

"@

$bar = $part[0]
$quux = $part[1]    

Write-Host $($SqlQuery)
#Run-SqlNonQuery $($SqlQuery)
}

share|improve this answer
    
Won't the here-string have empty values for $bar and $quux in the first iteration, and then be one pass behind each iteration after that? Did you mean to use single quotes on the here-string? –  Mike Shepard Jul 6 '11 at 15:30
    
This is exactly what I was hoping to avoid -- the here-string is quite long, and I really didn't want to re-declare it in each loop iteration, nor clutter my loop with a big, mostly-static declaration. It technically works, but is not the best solution. –  Val Jul 6 '11 at 16:29
    
@Mike, thanks, this gave me an idea, thread is updated :) –  Shay Levy Jul 7 '11 at 7:32
1  
@val, I updated the thread with a working solution. –  Shay Levy Jul 7 '11 at 7:32
    
@Shay, now that's better! A little wordy to explicitly call ..ExpandString(), but that makes what's happening clear, and keeping named variables in the here-string is a nice bonus. +1. –  Val Jul 7 '11 at 14:58

As Shay notes, the variables in the here-string need to be declared before they're used in the here-string. I've had occasion to want to move it just to make the script easier to read / maintain, and used a script block:

$MakeHereString = {
@"

Variables 1-3 are:
Variable 1 = $variable1
Variable 2 = $variable2
Variable 3 = $variable3
"@
}

$Variable1 = "First"
$Variable2 = "Second"
$Variable3 = "Third"

&$MakeHereString

Variables 1-3 are:
Variable 1 = First
Variable 2 = Second
Variable 3 = Third

For your example:

$SqlQuery = {
@"
update MyTable 
set foo = $bar
where baz = $quux
"@
}
...

foreach ($part in $parts) {
    $bar = $part[0]
    $quux = $part[1]

    Run-SqlNonQuery (&$SqlQuery)    #Run-SqlNonQuery is a funct. that    executes the query
}
share|improve this answer
    
This is a bit better than Shay's solution, since the here-string is outside the loop, but the syntax is much clumsier than Matt's solution: the script block and sub-expression are not obvious to write, and not easy to read. It works, but Matt's string formatting solution is best (and first!) Thanks, tho. –  Val Jul 6 '11 at 16:32
    
I guess it's subjective. I'd consider the replacement of the descriptive variable names in the here-string with the format enumerations to make the here-string harder to follow and debug, particluarly if it's long and contains many substitutions. –  mjolinor Jul 6 '11 at 16:43
    
yes, definitely subjective; I agree that it's easy to get lost counting placeholders. But when I saw "$(&$SqlQuery)" I thought of a cartoon character cursing at me ;-) -- just a bit too much magic there for my taste (now I gotta look up what that ampersand does!) –  Val Jul 6 '11 at 18:35
    
It looks like I may have erred with the $. It's not really necessary. Run-SqlNonQuery (&$SqlQuery) seems to work just as well, if that makes it easier. –  mjolinor Jul 6 '11 at 19:17
    
Cool, I'll give that approach a shot, too. Thanks! –  Val Jul 6 '11 at 20:40

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