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I want to calculate the count of total quarters (of a year) in the given time span.

for example:

start date = 1-june -2009
end date = 18-july-2011

count should be = 10.

one more 
start date = 4-Jan-2009 
end date = 27-oct -2010
count =8.

I have not been able to get the correct result.

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1  
what is you algo for this ? its like 1 quater = 3 month form the date you provided or from the month of date............. –  Pranay Rana Jul 6 '11 at 6:56
1  
Maybe this is a stupid question...but what exactly is a quarter? –  Roly Jul 6 '11 at 6:56
    
jan - mar = 1 quarter if single month is also there than i have to consider it as 1 quarter for ex start date = 4-Jan-2009 end date = 27-oct -2010 count =8. how 8 is reached jan09- mar09 =1,apr09-jun09 1,july09-sep09 1,oct09-dec09 1,than jan10-mar10 1,apr10-jun10 1,july10-sep10 1,oct10 is 1 so total 8. –  ankur Jul 6 '11 at 7:01
    
@ankur - try the code pasted by me –  Pranay Rana Jul 6 '11 at 7:08
2  
Are you really sure that your assumption that the numbers of quarters between 2010-01-01 and 2010-01-01 should be 1 instead of 0?? –  Tim Schmelter Jul 6 '11 at 7:56

5 Answers 5

up vote 5 down vote accepted

Your example is wrong: there are only 7 quarters between 4-Jan-2009 and 27-oct -2010

You could simply add a reference to the Microsoft.VisualBasic.dll to your project and use DateDiff:

VB:

Public Shared Function getQuartersBetween(ByVal d1 As Date, ByVal d2 As Date) As Int32
    Return DateDiff(DateInterval.Quarter, d1, d2)
End Function

C#:

public static int getQuartersBetween(System.DateTime d1, System.DateTime d2)
{
    return Microsoft.VisualBasic.DateAndTime.DateDiff(DateInterval.Quarter, d1, d2);
}

or you could write your own implementation:

public class Quarter
{

    public static long GetQuarters(DateTime dt1, DateTime dt2) 
    { 
        double d1Quarter = GetQuarter(dt1.Month); 
        double d2Quarter = GetQuarter(dt2.Month); 
        double d1 = d2Quarter - d1Quarter; 
        double d2 = (4 * (dt2.Year - dt1.Year)); 
        return Round(d1 + d2); 
    } 

    private static int GetQuarter(int nMonth) 
    { 
        if (nMonth <= 3) 
            return 1; 
        if (nMonth <= 6) 
            return 2; 
        if (nMonth <= 9) 
            return 3; 
        return 4; 
    } 

    private static long Round(double dVal) 
    { 
        if (dVal >= 0) 
              return (long)Math.Floor(dVal); 
        return (long)Math.Ceiling(dVal); 
    } 
}

or in VB.NET:

Public Class Quarter

    Public Shared Function GetQuarters(ByVal dt1 As DateTime, ByVal dt2 As DateTime) As Long
        Dim d1Quarter As Double = GetQuarter(dt1.Month)
        Dim d2Quarter As Double = GetQuarter(dt2.Month)
        Dim d1 As Double = d2Quarter - d1Quarter
        Dim d2 As Double = (4 * (dt2.Year - dt1.Year))
        Return Round(d1 + d2)
    End Function

    Private Shared Function GetQuarter(ByVal nMonth As Integer) As Integer
        If nMonth <= 3 Then
            Return 1
        End If
        If nMonth <= 6 Then
            Return 2
        End If
        If nMonth <= 9 Then
            Return 3
        End If
        Return 4
    End Function

    Private Shared Function Round(ByVal dVal As Double) As Long
        If dVal >= 0 Then
            Return CLng(Math.Floor(dVal))
        End If
        Return CLng(Math.Ceiling(dVal))
    End Function

End Class
share|improve this answer
    
well ..27 Oct lies in the fourth quarter .. so that makes it 8 –  V4Vendetta Jul 6 '11 at 7:32
    
But between 2010-01-01 and 2010-01-31 are 0 quarters and not 1, hence from first to fourth are three quarters + 4 = 7 quarters. –  Tim Schmelter Jul 6 '11 at 7:36
    
Not my call ..my assumption from the data the OP provided, only he can clarify for him 2010-01-01 and 2010-01-31 should be 1 –  V4Vendetta Jul 6 '11 at 7:38
    
@V4Vendetta: Ok, if he needs this unusual approach, he can add 1 to the result of my functions. –  Tim Schmelter Jul 6 '11 at 7:54

If the definition of a quarter is a 90-day difference, it's easy of course:

    internal static int GetNumberOfQuarters(DateTime p_DtStart, DateTime p_DtEnd)
    {
        TimeSpan span = p_DtEnd.Subtract(p_DtStart);
        return (int)span.TotalDays % 90;
    }

But that's not what you're looking for. What about this (not tested but you'll get the idea)

internal static class DateTimeTools
{
    internal static int GetNumberOfQuartersBetweenDates(DateTime startDate, DateTime endDate)
    {
        int iYearStart, iYearEnd, iMonthStart, iMonthEnd, iDayStart, iDayEnd;
        iYearStart = startDate.Year;
        iYearEnd = endDate.Year;
        iMonthStart = startDate.Month;
        iMonthEnd = endDate.Month;
        iDayStart = startDate.Day;
        iDayEnd = endDate.Day;

        int iYearDiff, iQuarterDiff, iDayDiff;
        iYearDiff = iYearEnd - iYearStart;
        iQuarterDiff = iMonthEnd % 3 - iMonthStart % 3;
        iDayDiff = iDayEnd - iDayStart;

        int iNumOfQuarters = 0;

        // at least a year difference? 
        if ((iYearDiff > 0 && iQuarterDiff > 0) || iYearDiff > 0 && iQuarterDiff == 0 && iDayDiff >= 0)
        {
            iNumOfQuarters = iYearDiff * 4 + iQuarterDiff;
        }
        // at least a quarter difference?
        // within different years
        if ((iYearDiff > 0 && iQuarterDiff <= 0)) // eg, dec 2010 - feb 2011 iYearDiff 1 iQuarterDiff -3
        {
            if ((iQuarterDiff == -3 && iDayDiff >= 0) || iQuarterDiff > -3)
            {
                iNumOfQuarters = iQuarterDiff + 4;
            }
        }
        // within the same year
        if (iYearDiff == 0 && iQuarterDiff > 0)
        {
            if ((iQuarterDiff == 1 && iDayDiff >= 0) || iQuarterDiff > 1)
            {
                iNumOfQuarters = iQuarterDiff;
            }
        }
        return iNumOfQuarters;
    }
}

Regards, Nico

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This is one crude form of calculating the quarters based on your assumptions, you can choose to modify as it is it works good enough

DateTime dt1 = new DateTime(2009, 1, 1);// new DateTime(2009, 6, 1);
DateTime dt2 = new DateTime(2010, 10, 27);// new DateTime(2011, 7, 18);
if (dt1.Month < 4)
  dt1 = new DateTime(dt1.Year,1,1);
else if (dt1.Month < 7)
  dt1 = new DateTime(dt1.Year,4,1);
else if (dt1.Month < 10)
  dt1 = new DateTime(dt1.Year,7,1);
else
  dt1 = new DateTime(dt1.Year,10,1);
if (dt2.Month < 4)
   dt2 = new DateTime(dt2.Year, 3, DateTime.DaysInMonth(dt2.Year, 3)); 
else if (dt2.Month < 7)
   dt2 = new DateTime(dt2.Year, 6, DateTime.DaysInMonth(dt2.Year, 6));
else if (dt2.Month < 10)
   dt2 = new DateTime(dt2.Year, 9, DateTime.DaysInMonth(dt2.Year, 9));
else
   dt2 = new DateTime(dt2.Year, 12, DateTime.DaysInMonth(dt2.Year, 12));

TimeSpan ts = dt2 - dt1;
int quarters = (int) ts.TotalDays/90;
Console.WriteLine(quarters);

I am baselining the dates to the start and end of the quarters as you want and then assuming for 90 day quarter transforming the diff as int. Works for your mentioned examples,see if it suits you well enough

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Code for you : Try below code

 public static void Main()
    {
        //Application.Run(new XmlTreeDisplay());
        int monthdiuff = monthDifference(Convert.ToDateTime("01/04/09"), Convert.ToDateTime("10/27/10"));
        Console.WriteLine(monthdiuff);
        int totalQuater = (monthdiuff / 3) + (monthdiuff%3);
        Console.WriteLine(totalQuater);
        Console.ReadLine();
    }

    private static int monthDifference(DateTime startDate, DateTime endDate)
    {
        int monthsApart = 12 * (startDate.Year - endDate.Year) + startDate.Month - endDate.Month;
        return Math.Abs(monthsApart);
    }
share|improve this answer
    
in the same example total quarters should be 8 but it is 7 infact i was also working arounf with similar piece of code but it is going wrong in some cases –  ankur Jul 6 '11 at 7:18
    
@ankur - right now its working fine for me as i can see –  Pranay Rana Jul 6 '11 at 7:43
    
@ankur - what are you looking for ??????????????? –  Pranay Rana Jul 6 '11 at 7:44

Without some code to look over I can't help you find your exact problem.

If it were me I would probably find the difference between the dates in days, then divide by number of days in a quarter (91 or so). I'm sure that C# has some kind of date parsing module that can read in the dates as a string, giving you two objects that you could then subtract to find the difference in days.

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