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// Program to print simple text on a Printer

import javax.swing.*;
import java.awt.*;
import java.awt.event.*;
import java.awt.print.PrinterException;
import java.awt.print.*;

class Printer extends JPanel implements Printable  {

  JButton print;

  Printer() {
    buildGUI();
    hookUpEvents();
  }

  public void buildGUI() {
    JFrame fr = new JFrame("Program to Print on a Printer");
    JPanel p = new JPanel();
    print = new JButton("Print");
    setPreferredSize( new Dimension ( 200,200 ) );
    p.setBackground( Color.black );
    fr.add(p);
    p.add( print , BorderLayout.CENTER );
    fr.pack();
    fr.setVisible( true );
  }

  public void hookUpEvents() {
    print.addActionListener( new ActionListener() {
      public void actionPerformed( ActionEvent ae ) {
        PrinterJob job = PrinterJob.getPrinterJob();
        job.setPrintable( new Printer() );
        boolean doPrint = job.printDialog();
        if( doPrint ) {
          try {
            job.print();
          } catch( PrinterException exc) {
            System.out.println( exc );
          }
        } else {
          System.out.println("You cancelled the print");
        } 
      }
    });
  }

  public int print( Graphics g , PageFormat pf , int pageIndex) throws PrinterException{
    Graphics2D g2d = (Graphics2D)g;
    g2d.translate(pf.getImageableX(), pf.getImageableY());
    g.drawString( "testing..." , 100 , 100 );
    return PAGE_EXISTS;
  }

  public static void main( String args[] ) {
    new Printer();
  }
}

After the command java Printer the output is :

enter image description here

But as i click print , along with the following window :

enter image description here

i again get the former window. Why does this happen ?

When does the print method of Printable interface get called in this program?

Why does my window size come small when i have set =200,200.

share|improve this question
    
What makes you think that Printable.print() is called in this program? I don't see any evidence in your question that this is hapenning, necessarily. –  Andrzej Doyle Jul 6 '11 at 7:36
    
@ Andrzej Doyle then what is print method of printable interface there for ? –  Suhail Gupta Jul 6 '11 at 7:47
    
@Suhail Gupta: Like I mentionned in my answer, you're overriding it. The interface is actually a class that forces you to implement the methods it contains yourself. The one in printable doesn't actually do anything, it's just there to force you to define what you want it to do in the class that implements it (ie: your printer class) –  Adam Smith Jul 6 '11 at 7:52

1 Answer 1

up vote 2 down vote accepted

All right, so you had three questions:

First: The reason why your window is small is because you're using jf.pack() along with a border layout, which makes your JFrame the size required to display all the component it contains without extra space around. You could set the layout to null and lose the jf.pack() part, but this is not usually a recommended practice.

Second: The window pops up a second time because you're creating a second instance of the same object in your listener there:

job.setPrintable( new Printer() );

The "new Printer()" part creates another Printer object, which calls the UI creation again, etc.

You could create an inner class instead of an anonymous class to be able to use "this" to refer to the current Printer object.

Your hookUpEvents() method would be something like this:

public void hookUpEvents() {
  MyActionListener mal = new MyActionListener();
  print.addActionListener(mal); {
}

Then, somewhere else in the same class create the inner class like this:

private class MyActionListener implements ActionListener{
  public void actionPerformed(ActionEvent ae) {
    PrinterJob job = PrinterJob.getPrinterJob();
    job.setPrintable(Printer.this);
    boolean doPrint = job.printDialog();
     if( doPrint ) {
       try {
        job.print();
       }  
       catch( PrinterException exc) {
           System.out.println( exc );
       }
     }  
     else {
        System.out.println("You cancelled the print"); 
      } 
    }
}

Third: The print() method is called when you type: "job.print()" since you're overriding the method from the interface. The one in the interface is never actually called since yours is called instead, which is what you want since you defined what it had to do.

I hope this answers your questions now.

Edit: I just tested something similar and I think you could just type Printer.this in the anonymous class to make it work instead of creating an inner class, which would have you change way less code.

share|improve this answer
1  
using this won't do.I am using it inside the anonymous class –  Suhail Gupta Jul 6 '11 at 7:27
    
when is the print() method called ? –  Suhail Gupta Jul 6 '11 at 7:29
    
I see, I didn't think of it... I guess you could create an inner class instead of an anonymous class and you'd then be able to use "this". –  Adam Smith Jul 6 '11 at 7:30
    
@ Adam Smith-1 : –  saplingPro Jul 6 '11 at 7:31
    
@grassPro and @Suhail Gupta: I edited my answer to answer all three questions asked. It should work now. –  Adam Smith Jul 6 '11 at 7:48

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