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Is there a way to create some optional fields in application settings. For example for one client we need some client based settings in the settings file, something like this:

<?xml version="1.0"?>
<configuration>
  <configSections>
    <userSettings>
      <setting name="Client_1_out_folder" serializeAs="String">
        <value>c:\</value>
      </setting>
      <setting name="Some_other_setting" serializeAs="String">
        <value>True</value>
      </setting>
      ...

And for the other client we dont need the Client_1_out_folder at all so to keep the config file clean would be nice to remove it from the config file all together. So for client 2 that part of config file would look like:

<?xml version="1.0"?>
<configuration>
  <configSections>
    <userSettings>
      <setting name="Some_other_setting" serializeAs="String">
        <value>True</value>
      </setting>
      ...
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1  
what exactly is stopping you from removing the "Client_1_out_folder" setting from the config file used for the client that doesn't need it? –  Adam Ralph Jul 16 '11 at 11:37

7 Answers 7

up vote 7 down vote accepted
+150

Create a custon configuration section for your settings. Then on the configurationsection class, mark the property as "IsRequired=false" to make that property optional.

[ConfigurationProperty("frontPagePostCount"
    , DefaultValue = 20
    , IsRequired = false)]
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+1 for the good article! –  Mrchief Jul 15 '11 at 20:47

You can create a class which inherits from ConfigurationSection.

Then, you can do practically whatever you want. It's much more powerful than the user settings.

MSDN: How to: Create Custom Configuration Sections Using ConfigurationSection

You can extend ASP.NET configuration settings with XML configuration elements of your own. To do this, you create a custom configuration section handler. The handler must be a .NET Framework class that inherits from the System.Configuration.ConfigurationSection class. The section handler interprets and processes the settings that are defined in XML configuration elements in a specific section of a Web.config file. You can read and write these settings through the handler's properties.

The article says "ASP.NET", but it's not just for ASP.NET. It works equally well for WinForms.

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I recommend creating your own configuration sections with Configuration Section Designer.

Unfortunately this tool isn't compatible with VS2010 but it is so very helpful that I keep using VS2008 to use it. Either way you create an extra assembly for the configuration section handler so you can use VS2008 only for this assembly and build the rest of the solution with VS2010. So this isn't a huge drawback at all.

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+1 for pointing the tool out. –  Mrchief Jul 15 '11 at 20:46
    
+1 Actually, the screen caps on codeplex look like they were taken from VS2010. –  Groo Jul 16 '11 at 9:39
    
Yes, looks like finally they realeased a new version for VS 2010. Must try it out. –  hs2d Jul 16 '11 at 17:56

There is also a good sample about create a custom configuration sections.

I hope it can help you...

app-config-and-custom-configuration-sections

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Put those common settings in a .config file, and refer it in a special config file.

<!-- in general.config -->
<appSettings>
  <add key="common1" value="something"/>
  <add key="common2" value="something else"/>
</appSettings>

<!-- in client1.config -->
<appSettings file="general.config" >
  <add key="specialKey1" value="for client 1 only"/>
</appSettings>

<!-- in client2.config -->
<appSettings file="general.config" >
  <add key="specialKey2" value="for client 2 only"/>
</appSettings>
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1  
How this makes the configurations optional? –  hs2d Jul 6 '11 at 8:32

The use of custom configuration sections is a good idea, and you can then code for the entry to be required. That is a nice and clean way to handle this problem.

However, you could also handle this by a class that picks up these details, and tests for the existence ( or otherwise ) of this, having them all still in the usersettings section. So your main code would access the setting from the class:

if(Settings.HasClient)
    //use Settings.Client;

Process(Settings.OtherSetting);

Depending on how you need to use them. Within Settings Constructor, you would access the settings directly.

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I suspect there is something missing from your question.

If client 2 does not require the "Client_1_out_folder" setting and does not try and retrieve it at run time, you should be able to simply remove it, without having to make any other changes.

Have you tried doing so?

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