Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free.

I want to pass two elements in the same event to a function so as to display both elements upon clicking a link button.

this is the function

function showMenu(elmnt)
        {
            document.getElementById(elmnt).style.visibility="visible";
        }

These are the two element I want to display. Only the first one is displayed. How can I display both at the same time by clicking the button.

<div id="navigation">
        <ul>
            <li><a href="#" onClick="showMenu('scroll')" onClick="showMenu('oath')" >Oath</a></li>
            <li><a href="#">Apply</a></li>
        </ul>
    </div>
share|improve this question

5 Answers 5

up vote 2 down vote accepted
function showMenu(elmnt1, elmnt2) {
    document.getElementById(elmnt1).style.visibility="visible";
    document.getElementById(elmnt2).style.visibility="visible";
}

onClick="showMenu('scroll', 'oath')"

or:

function showMenu(elements) {
    for (var i = 0; i < elements.length; i++) {
        document.getElementById(elements[i]).style.visibility="visible";
    }
}

onClick="showMenu(['scroll', 'oath'])"

This all could be done much more elegantly by attaching the event handlers using Javascript etc., you should look into unobtrusive Javascript.

share|improve this answer
    
return false too –  mplungjan Jul 6 '11 at 8:00
    
A variation on your second option is to use the arguments object within your function and then just call it as showMenu('scroll,'oath');. –  nnnnnn Jul 6 '11 at 8:02
    
@nnnnnn - see my answer - I prefer to pass an array too –  mplungjan Jul 6 '11 at 8:09
    
@mplungjan - I was just offering another option. If you use arguments the function still handles any number of ids with a simple loop through arguments but the call is slightly simpler. But then using an array parameter is also useful if you are storing the list of ids somewhere before calling the function. –  nnnnnn Jul 6 '11 at 8:19
    
I understand. I was tempted myself to use the arguments, but I vaguely remembered something about deprecation. However it is not the arguments that are deprecated. –  mplungjan Jul 6 '11 at 8:23
function showMenu(elmnt1, elmnt2)
{
   document.getElementById(elmnt1).style.visibility="visible";
   document.getElementById(elmnt2).style.visibility="visible";
}

<li><a href="#" onclick="showMenu('scroll', 'oath'); return false;">Oath</a></li>

The return false is to stop the standard event the browser would perform when hitting on the link.

share|improve this answer
    
At least you return false. –  mplungjan Jul 6 '11 at 8:02

Couldn't you just use onClick="showMenu('scroll', 'oath');return false;" and then have the function:

function showMenu(el1, el2)
    {
        document.getElementById(el1).style.visibility="visible";
        document.getElementById(el2).style.visibility="visible";
    }

The preferred method of attaching events is using addEventListener instead of attributes. You need to add IE support using attachEvent. MDN - addEventListener().

share|improve this answer
    
return false too –  mplungjan Jul 6 '11 at 8:01
    
True - although due to the href being # there wouldn't be a page reload. Updated. –  Smirkin Gherkin Jul 6 '11 at 8:42
    
There USED to be be an invisible page unload - I just tried it, and it seems you are correct in Fx5 at least jsfiddle.net/mplungjan/EUheF - but try clicking the links at the bottom of the fiddle now –  mplungjan Jul 6 '11 at 8:50
    
Ah, good point. I guess because the named location doesn't exist it scrolls back to the top. One to remember in future, although for the past few years I have been using the event argument for cancelling default behaviour. Good to learn something new. –  Smirkin Gherkin Jul 6 '11 at 10:37

Passing an array so we can have an "on" as second argument

function showHide(elmnt,on) {
  if (elmnt.length==null) elmnt=[elmnt]; 
  for (var i=0,n=elmnt.length;i<n;i++) {
    var item = document.getElementById(elmnt[i]);
    if (item) item.style.visibility=on?"visible":"hidden";
  }
  return false;
}

Multiple:

<a href="#" onclick="return showHide(['scroll','oath'],1)">Show</a>
<a href="#" onclick="return showHide(['scroll','oath'],0)">Hide</a>

single items:

<a href="#" onclick="return showHide('scroll',1)">Show</a>
<a href="#" onclick="return showHide('scroll',0)">Hide</a>

Alternatively, pass on as first argument and, as suggested elsewhere, loop over the arguments object object from item 1

function showHide() {
  var on = arguments[0]
  for (var i=1,n=arguments.length;i<n;i++) { // from 1
    var item = document.getElementById(arguments[i]);
    if (item) item.style.visibility=on?"visible":"hidden";
  }
  return false;
}


<a href="#" onclick="return showHide(1,'scroll','oath')">Show</a>
<a href="#" onclick="return showHide(0,'scroll','oath')">Hide</a>

Lastly (getting into jQuery territory here) pass an object to allow selective on and off

function showHide(obj) {
  for (var o in obj) {
    var item = document.getElementById(o);
    if (item) item.style.visibility=obj[o]?"visible":"hidden";
  }
  return false;
}


<a href="#" onclick="return showHide({'scroll':1,'oath':0})">Show scroll, hide oath</a>
<a href="#" onclick="return showHide({'scroll':0,'oath':1})">Hide scroll, Show oath</a>
share|improve this answer

try something like this:

function showMenu(elmnt1, elmnt2)

{

document.getElementById(elmnt1).style.visibility="visible";
            document.getElementById(elmnt2).style.visibility="visible";

}

<li><a href="#" onClick="showMenu('scroll', 'oath')">Oath</a></li>
share|improve this answer
    
Indent your code by two spaces! Read the help on the edit screen. –  deceze Jul 6 '11 at 7:54
    
4 spaces - but simpler to highlight and click {} –  mplungjan Jul 6 '11 at 8:00
    
return false too –  mplungjan Jul 6 '11 at 8:02

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.