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I am trying to convert a set to a list in Python 2.6. I'm using this syntax:

first_list = [1,2,3,4]
my_set=set(first_list)
my_list = list(my_set)

However, I get the following stack trace:

Traceback (most recent call last):
  File "<console>", line 1, in <module>
TypeError: 'set' object is not callable

How can I fix this?

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1  
Works for me on Python 2.6.6 on Linux... but that first line doesn't create a set. –  detly Jul 6 '11 at 9:10
1  
According TypeError: 'set' object is not callable: What is set? Thanks –  eat Jul 6 '11 at 9:13
    
Are you sure the Traceback is from that piece of code? Works fine for me on Python 2.6.6 (and on ideone.com/6dYZj). But as already mentioned, my_set is already a list, not a set. –  Shawn Chin Jul 6 '11 at 9:18
6  
You've shadowed the set builtin. Perhaps you accidently typed set=set(first_list) or something. Now set is redefined to this set object which would cause that error. Try again with a fresh Python interpreter –  gnibbler Jul 6 '11 at 9:35
2  
@gnibbler: you should put that as an answer, as that's clearly what it was that did break it. –  Chris Morgan Jul 6 '11 at 10:02

7 Answers 7

up vote 31 down vote accepted

It is already a list

type(my_set)
>>> <type 'list'>

Do you want something like

my_set = set([1,2,3,4])
my_list = list(my_set)
print my_list
>> [1, 2, 3, 4]

EDIT : Output of your last comment

>>> my_list = [1,2,3,4]
>>> my_set = set(my_list)
>>> my_new_list = list(my_set)
>>> print my_new_list
[1, 2, 3, 4]

I'm wondering if you did something like this :

>>> set=set()
>>> set([1,2])
Traceback (most recent call last):
  File "<stdin>", line 1, in <module>
TypeError: 'set' object is not callable
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When i do type(my_set) i get <type 'set'> –  gath Jul 6 '11 at 9:19
    
@gath, that was before you edited the code. Your current code works fine on my machine. Can you try copy pasting that into a python interpreter as it is and paste the output here –  buffer Jul 6 '11 at 9:28
    
Edited the question with the correct syntax –  gath Jul 6 '11 at 9:28
1  
try this: >>> my_list = [1,2,3,4] >>> my_set = set(my_list) >>> my_new_list = list(my_set) Traceback (most recent call last): File "<console>", line 1, in <module> TypeError: 'set' object is not callable –  gath Jul 6 '11 at 9:33
    
It works for me. Can you try a different machine / python installation. What's your environment? –  buffer Jul 6 '11 at 9:34

Instead of:

first_list = [1,2,3,4]
my_set=set(first_list)
my_list = list(my_set)

Why not shortcut the process:

my_list = list(set([1,2,3,4])

This will remove the dupes from you list and return a list back to you.

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There is no difference between both. You just inlined the variable assignements. –  user647772 Sep 28 '12 at 10:26

Review your first line. Your stack trace is clearly not from the code you've pasted here, so I don't know precisely what you've done.

>>> my_set=([1,2,3,4])
>>> my_set
[1, 2, 3, 4]
>>> type(my_set)
<type 'list'>
>>> list(my_set)
[1, 2, 3, 4]
>>> type(_)
<type 'list'>

What you wanted was set([1, 2, 3, 4]).

>>> my_set = set([1, 2, 3, 4])
>>> my_set
set([1, 2, 3, 4])
>>> type(my_set)
<type 'set'>
>>> list(my_set)
[1, 2, 3, 4]
>>> type(_)
<type 'list'>

The "not callable" exception means you were doing something like set()() - attempting to call a set instance.

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[EDITED] It's seems you earlier have redefined "list", using it as a variable name, like this:

list = set([1,2,3,4]) # oops
#...
first_list = [1,2,3,4]
my_set=set(first_list)
my_list = list(my_set)

And you'l get

Traceback (most recent call last):
  File "<console>", line 1, in <module>
TypeError: 'set' object is not callable
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Edited the question to the correct syntax, please review. –  gath Jul 6 '11 at 9:30
    
I'v edited my comment –  Ruslan Grohovetsky Jul 21 '11 at 12:12

I'm not sure that you're creating a set with this ([1, 2]) syntax, rather a list. To create a set, you should use set([1, 2]).

These brackets are just envelopping your expression, as if you would have written:

if (condition1
    and condition2 == 3):
    print something

There're not really ignored, but do nothing to your expression.

Note: (something, something_else) will create a tuple (but still no list).

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Edited the question with correct syntax, please review –  gath Jul 6 '11 at 9:29
    
@gath your edit seems fine to me, at least the first block. Are you still having the error? Can you try this in a new command-line? What do you get when typing just set? –  Joël Jul 6 '11 at 12:31

Python is a dynamically typed language, which means that you cannot define the type of the variable as you do in C or C++:

type variable = value

or

type variable(value)

In Python, you use coercing if you change types, or the init functions (constructors) of the types to declare a variable of a type:

my_set = set([1,2,3])
type my_set

will give you <type 'set'> for an answer.

If you have a list, do this:

my_list = [1,2,3]
my_set = set(my_list)
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Hmmm I bet that in some previous lines you have something like:

list = set(something)

Am I wrong ?

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