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I have some Objective-C code that does the job for me. But is it ugly (inefficient). Can it be performed better with for-each loops?

See this code please:

for (int i = 0; i < [careerIds count]; i++) {

    NSString *titleString = [[titles objectAtIndex:i] stringValue];
    if ([titleString isEqualToString:@""] || [titleString rangeOfString:@"Intresseanmälan"].location != NSNotFound) {
        // Don't add the id
    } else {
        [ids addObject:[[careerIds objectAtIndex:i] stringValue]];
    }

}
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Probably not. It is a little bit ugly, but I think worrying about the efficiency in this case is probably misplaced. –  walkytalky Jul 6 '11 at 10:28
    
If you're concerned about the speed, see this answer where @Deepak actually timed the various options and found that not using fast iteration is faster than using fast iteration if that means that you also have to -indexOfObject. Or at least it was in the case tested. –  Caleb Jul 6 '11 at 11:08

3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

I don't think the code that you have is particularly ugly -- there's nothing at all wrong with using an indexed for loop as you've done. The only thing I might change would be to invert the sense of the if statement so that you avoid the empty // Don't add the id line. Here's one way:

for (int i = 0; i < [careerIds count]; i++) {

    NSString *titleString = [[titles objectAtIndex:i] stringValue];

    if (([titleString length] > 0) && 
        ([titleString rangeOfString:@"Intresseanmälan"].location == NSNotFound))
    {
        [ids addObject:[[careerIds objectAtIndex:i] stringValue]];
    }

}

To get to the heart of your question, no, I don't believe it's possible to use the fast enumeration version of the for loop to iterate over the contents of two separate containers at the same time. You can use it with one, but as I pointed out in a comment, you then have to use -indexOfObject: to recover the index of the current object so that you can get the corresponding item from the other array using -objectAtIndex:.

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You should be able to remove ([titleString length] > 0) without a problem or probably just titleString to check if its not nil but I doubt even that would be necessary. –  Deepak Danduprolu Jul 6 '11 at 10:46
2  
@Deepak titleString should never be nil, but it might legitimately be @"", in which case rangeOfString would return NSNotFound and the object addition would be performed, incorrectly. –  walkytalky Jul 6 '11 at 10:55
    
@walkytalky aah! I see what you're saying. I didn't expect it to be nil but yeah, I was wrong about the @"" part. –  Deepak Danduprolu Jul 6 '11 at 11:00
1  
@Deepak, I could have said ![titleString isEqualToString:@""], but it's easy (to me) to miss that !, and I think using length > 0 better conveys "not empty". You're right that titleString should never be nil with the code above, but in a situation where the tested string might be nil, [titleString length] > 0 does the expected thing (evaluates to NO). –  Caleb Jul 6 '11 at 11:01
1  
In terms of making it less ugly (easier to read in future) you could add a well named BOOL like BOOL isTitleValid = ([titleString length] > 0) && ([titleString rangeOfString:@"Intresseanmälan"].location == NSNotFound); and then use the isTitleValid variable in the if statement. It just means you don't have to do a double take to figure out what you was originally checking. –  Paul.s Jul 6 '11 at 11:13

Can it be performed better with for-each loops?

Yes.

for (id title in careerIds) {

    NSString *titleString = [title stringValue];
    if ([titleString isEqualToString:@""] || [titleString rangeOfString:@"Intresseanmälan"].location != NSNotFound) {
        // Don't add the id
    } else {
        [ids addObject:titleString];
    }
}

Or if you want to be really flash:

for (NSString* titleString in [careerIds valueForKey: @"stringValue"]) {

    if ([titleString isEqualToString:@""] || [titleString rangeOfString:@"Intresseanmälan"].location != NSNotFound) {
        // Don't add the id
    } else {
        [ids addObject:titleString];
    }
}

No. :-)

share|improve this answer
    
Check the question: the object being added is from a different source than the object being tested. So the answer is probably really "no". –  walkytalky Jul 6 '11 at 10:23
    
Neither of these appears to do what the OP's code does. In the original code, titleString comes from the titles array, which doesn't appear anywhere in your code. If careerIds and titles are parallel arrays, then you must either join them into a single array first, or use -indexOfObject:, or use a traditional indexed for loop as in the original code. –  Caleb Jul 6 '11 at 10:32
    
@walkytalky: You're right, missed that. –  JeremyP Jul 6 '11 at 10:34

Assuming careerIds is a NSArray or NSMutableArray and that you're add NSString objects to it, you can do this:

for (NSString *titleString in careerIds) {

    if ([titleString isEqualToString:@""] || [titleString rangeOfString:@"Intresseanmälan"].location != NSNotFound) {
        // Don't add the id
    } else {
        [ids addObject: titleString];
    }
}

[ids addObject:[[careerIds objectAtIndex:i] stringValue]];

share|improve this answer
    
See my comment to @JeremyP's answer. This code does not replicate the original functionality. –  walkytalky Jul 6 '11 at 10:27
1  
Oh, and you're using i without declaring or defining it. Whoever upvoted this needs a stern talking to. –  walkytalky Jul 6 '11 at 10:33
    
Whoops, guess I should have gone over it a bit more carefully. I was only looking at the for loop. I didn't do anything with the code inside it. Thanks for catching that. :) –  mikeytdan Jul 6 '11 at 11:08

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