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It seems that this question was not discussed on stackoverflow before, save for Working With Nested XPath Predicates ... Refined where the solution not involving nested predicates was offered.

So i tried to write the oversimplified sample of what i'd like to get:

Input:

<root>
    <shortOfSupply>
        <food animal="doggie"/>
        <food animal="horse"/>
    </shortOfSupply>
    <animalsDictionary>
        <cage name="A" animal="kittie"/>
        <cage name="B" animal="dog"/>
        <cage name="C" animal="cow"/>
        <cage name="D" animal="zebra"/>
    </animals>
</root>

Output:

<root>
    <hungryAnimals>
        <cage name="B"/>
        <cage name="D"/>
    </hungryAnimals>
</root>

or, alternatively, if there is no intersections,

<root>
    <everythingIsFine/>
</root>

And i want to get it using a nested predicates:

<xsl:template match="cage">
    <cage>
        <xsl:attribute name="name">
            <xsl:value-of select="@name"/>
        </xsl:attribute>
    </cage>
</xsl:template>

<xsl:template match="/root/animalsDictionary">
    <xsl:choose>
        <!--                                                             in <food>     in <cage>       -->
        <xsl:when test="cage[/root/shortOfSupply/food[ext:isEqualAnimals(./@animal, ?????/@animal)]]">
            <hungryAnimals>
                <xsl:apply-templates select="cage[/root/shortOfSupply/food[ext:isEqualAnimals(@animal, ?????/@animal)]]"/>
            </hungryAnimals>
        </xsl:when>
        <xsl:otherwise>
            <everythingIsFine/>
        </xsl:otherwise>
    </xsl:choose>
</xsl:template>

So what should i write in place of that ??????

I know i could rewrite the entire stylesheet using one more template and extensive usage of variables/params, but it makes even this stylesheet significantly more complex, let alone the real stylesheet i have for real problem.

It is written in XPath reference that the dot . sign means the current context node, but it doesn't tell whether there is any possibility to get the node of context before that; and i just can't believe XPath is missing this obvious feature.

share|improve this question
    
I think the "missing feature" you are speaking about is the XSLT function current(). However, in this situation you don't need that. See my answer. –  empo Jul 6 '11 at 11:38
    
"I know that i could replace (...) but it won't help in my actual problem, and i really need to use nested predicates", if this is true, change your example, because does not seem so. –  empo Jul 6 '11 at 11:47
    
AFAIK current() references to the scope of the entire template, while i need the scope of the outer predicate. That is, in the inner predicate current() will mean <animalsDictionary>, . will mean <food>, and i need to get <animal> in some way. –  penartur Jul 6 '11 at 11:47
1  
As I said, you don't need that (as demonstrated in the answers below) unless you have provided a misleading input sample. –  empo Jul 6 '11 at 11:49
1  
I'm sorry but I can't keep guessing. The quality and correcteness of the answers here are directly proportional to the quality of the quesion. –  empo Jul 6 '11 at 12:06

4 Answers 4

up vote 6 down vote accepted

XPath 2.0 one-liner:

for $a in /*/animalsDictionary/cage
      return
        if(/*/shortOfSupply/*[my:isA($a/@animal, @animal)])
          then $a
          else ()

When applied on the provided XML document selects:

   <cage name="B"/>
   <cage name="D"/>

One cannot use a single XPath 1.0 expression to find that a given cage contains a hungry animal.

Here is an XSLT solution (XSLT 2.0 is used only to avoid using an extension function for the comparison -- in an XSLT 1.0 solution one will use an extension function for the comparison and the xxx:node-set() extension to test if the RTF produced by applying templates in the body of the variable contains any child element):

<xsl:stylesheet version="2.0"
 xmlns:xsl="http://www.w3.org/1999/XSL/Transform"
 xmlns:xs="http://www.w3.org/2001/XMLSchema"
 xmlns:my="my:my" exclude-result-prefixes="xs my">
 <xsl:output omit-xml-declaration="yes" indent="yes"/>

 <my:Dict>
  <a genName="doggie">
    <name>dog</name>
    <name>bulldog</name>
    <name>puppy</name>
  </a>
  <a genName="horse">
    <name>horse</name>
    <name>zebra</name>
    <name>pony</name>
  </a>
  <a genName="cat">
    <name>kittie</name>
    <name>kitten</name>
  </a>
 </my:Dict>

 <xsl:variable name="vDict" select=
  "document('')/*/my:Dict/a"/>

 <xsl:template match="/">
  <root>
   <xsl:variable name="vhungryCages">
    <xsl:apply-templates select=
    "/*/animalsDictionary/cage"/>
   </xsl:variable>

   <xsl:choose>
    <xsl:when test="$vhungryCages/*">
     <hungryAnimals>
       <xsl:copy-of select="$vhungryCages"/>
     </hungryAnimals>
    </xsl:when>
    <xsl:otherwise>
     <everythingIsFine/>
    </xsl:otherwise>
   </xsl:choose>
  </root>
 </xsl:template>

 <xsl:template match="cage">
  <xsl:if test="
  /*/shortOfSupply/*[my:isA(current()/@animal,@animal)]">

  <cage name="{@name}"/>
  </xsl:if>
 </xsl:template>

 <xsl:function name="my:isA" as="xs:boolean">
  <xsl:param name="pSpecName" as="xs:string"/>
  <xsl:param name="pGenName" as="xs:string"/>

  <xsl:sequence select=
   "$pSpecName = $vDict[@genName = $pGenName]/name"/>
 </xsl:function>
</xsl:stylesheet>

When this transformation is applied on the provided XML document (corrected to be well-formed):

<root>
    <shortOfSupply>
        <food animal="doggie"/>
        <food animal="horse"/>
    </shortOfSupply>
    <animalsDictionary>
        <cage name="A" animal="kittie"/>
        <cage name="B" animal="dogs"/>
        <cage name="C" animal="cow"/>
        <cage name="D" animal="zebras"/>
    </animalsDictionary>
</root>

the wanted, correct result is produced:

<root>
   <hungryAnimals>
      <cage name="B"/>
      <cage name="D"/>
   </hungryAnimals>
</root>

Explanation: Do note the use of the XSLT current() function.

share|improve this answer
    
That's a good answer, but a bit late one :) However, your code mainly consists of unnecessary isA implementation which is originally external in my example (and without that implementation there would not be requirement for XSLT 2.0); also, the very same idea of avoiding nested predicates was already mentioned in my last comment on empo answer :) –  penartur Jul 6 '11 at 16:05
    
@penatur: I haven't read any other answer or your comments on them. And I explicitly point out in my answer that XSLT 2.0 isn't necessary -- the same solution can be used almost exactly in XSLT 1.0. The implementation of my:isA() function is necessary if one wants to show actually running code without writing any extensions in a non-xslt language -- this is the main reason I had to use XSLT 2.0. In the rest of the code I have been careful not to use any other XSLT 2.0 feature, so that the solution can be re-written in XSLT 1.0. Why do you think my answer is "a bit late"? –  Dimitre Novatchev Jul 6 '11 at 16:08
    
When i wrote my comment there wasn't that one-liner in your answer :) i guess it works in 2.0, but i have to stick with 1.0 (.NET). BTW, don't you think that such 2.0 syntax is a bit ugly compared to clear 1.0? Does 2.0 still not support referencing an arbitrary-level predicate? EDIT: Also there wasn't your comment; you're a bit late because Michael Kay already gave a correct answer a couple of minutes earlier. –  penartur Jul 6 '11 at 16:09
    
@penatur: Can you suggest implementing range variables in a way that you consider "not ugly"? –  Dimitre Novatchev Jul 6 '11 at 16:12
    
@penatur: An answer is never late to collect upvotes :) –  Dimitre Novatchev Jul 6 '11 at 16:14

XPath 1.0 is not "relationally complete" - it can't do arbitrary joins. If you're in XSLT, you can always get round the limitations by binding variables to intermediate nodesets, or (sometimes) by using the current() function.

XPath 2.0 introduces range variables, which makes it relationally complete, so this limitation has gone.

share|improve this answer
    
That's a shame. I wonder whether there was some technological limitation beyond it or they just forgot about nested joins when developing that . vs. current() feature... –  penartur Jul 6 '11 at 15:54
    
XSLT and XPath were developed by people whose background was in document processing, not databases. Things like joins weren't high on the agenda. This all happened before XML started to be widely used for data as well as documents. –  Michael Kay Jul 7 '11 at 12:06
    
I didn't realise it is a join until Dimitre pointed me at this. Still it seems quite logically to be able to reference arbitrary-level context when there is nested contexts feature... –  penartur Jul 7 '11 at 13:12

Notice The dot operator in XPath is related to the current context. In XSLT the current template context_ is given by the function current(), which most of the time (not always) coincides with the ..


You can perform the test (and the apply templates as well), using the parent axis abbreviation (../):

 cage[@animal=../../shortOfSupply/food/@animal]

Moreover the match pattern in the the first template is wrong, it should be relative to the root:

 /root/animalsDictionary

@Martin suggestion is also obviously correct.

Your final template slightly modified:

<xsl:stylesheet 
    xmlns:xsl="http://www.w3.org/1999/XSL/Transform"
    version="1.0">

    <xsl:output method="xml" indent="yes" omit-xml-declaration="yes"/>
    <xsl:strip-space elements="*"/>

    <xsl:template match="root/animalsDictionary">
        <xsl:choose>
            <xsl:when test="cage[@animal=../../shortOfSupply/food/@animal]">
                <hungryAnimals>
                    <xsl:apply-templates select="cage[@animal
                            =../../shortOfSupply/food/@animal]"/>
                </hungryAnimals>
            </xsl:when>
            <xsl:otherwise>
                <everythingIsFine/>
            </xsl:otherwise>
        </xsl:choose>
    </xsl:template>

    <xsl:template match="cage">
        <cage name="{@name}"/>
    </xsl:template> 

</xsl:stylesheet>
share|improve this answer
    
Your test suggestion was originally described in the penultimate paragraph of the question. As for your point about the match pattern, that was just a mistype :) –  penartur Jul 6 '11 at 11:37
    
I can't read that in your question. Did you delete it?? –  empo Jul 6 '11 at 11:40
    
No, it is still there: I know that i could replace the test with cage[/shortOfSupply/food/@animal = @animal] and rewrite output of "hungry" cages list using <xsl:template match="cage" mode="tellIfHungry">; but it won't help in my actual problem, and i really need to use nested predicates there (or to write really much of really unneeded and obscure code). –  penartur Jul 6 '11 at 11:45
    
Why not cage[ext:isEqualAnimals(/root/shortOfSupply/food/@animal, @animal)]? –  empo Jul 6 '11 at 12:50
    
Because /root/shortOfSupply/food/@animal returns nodeset, and isEqualAnimals compares strings. I now see the drawback of my example; it seems that it is unclear that shortOfSupply may contain several child nodes. I'll fix it now (EDIT: fixed an example in question) –  penartur Jul 6 '11 at 12:58

Doesn't <xsl:when test="cage[@animal = /root/shortOfSupply/food/@animal]"> suffice to express your test condition?

share|improve this answer
    
I already described this case in the penultimate paragraph of the question :) –  penartur Jul 6 '11 at 11:33

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